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Don midwest
Don midwest

Bruno Latour on NYT column on best year for humans which means the worst for the environmewnt

***
There was a long interview of Bruno in NYT a few weeks ago. The title included the words “post truth”

The other day there was a book review of Bruno’s new book and another book on Fake News

Bruno makes the point that “facts speak for themselves” is out of this world. What language do they speak? Where to they stand? How much do they weigh? How long do they live? In particular, facts require an institution for their existence and ongoing support. Which is why the distrust of almost all institutions is such a problem these days. Science held an exhaulted place for a few hundred years but the environment crisis has called them into question and they can no longer hide behind “facts speak for them selves.”

From the NYT review mentioned above

In “Down to Earth: Politics in the New Climatic Regime,” Latour argues that climate change is forcing all of us to confront truths that seem hard to reconcile but turn out to be two sides of the same thing: 1) reality exists, whether we like it or not; and 2) our attempts to apprehend it are contingent on our social context. Along with Cailin O’Connor and James Owen Weatherall’s “The Misinformation Age: How False Beliefs Spread,” Latour’s new book offers a way to think through the seemingly insurmountable impasse carved out by political polarization and fake news

.

Latour’s “Down to Earth” is a wilder, more playful book — even if, like “The Misinformation Age,” it covers big subjects like truth and the fate of the species. The election of Donald Trump, Latour says, was a clarifying event, not only for Americans but for the world. Here, finally, was a political figure whose brazen repudiations of reality laid bare what Latour has been saying all along — that a complacent faith in the ability of facts to speak for themselves was what rendered them vulnerable to Trumpian renunciation in the first place.

most of the review is on the other book, “The Misinformation Age” which is closer to one that can be used right now, Bruno often runs ahead of now

Latour’s talk about how facts derive their authority from trust might sound squishy and abstract, but he considers himself a realist. He says that climate change renders the old dichotomy of the global versus the local completely futile. Trump and the “obscurantist elites” who enable him are nurturing an “Out-of-This-World” fantasy by unleashing an aggressive despoliation of the earth that ultimately rejects the world they claim to inhabit. At the same time, Trump pacifies his base with panicky nationalism and border walls, delineating a “rump territory” that is “no more plausible, no more livable” than the globalized world they rail against.

“It is quite useless to become outraged on the pretext that Trump voters ‘don’t believe in facts,’” Latour writes. Rather than get tangled in shouting matches over fake news, Latour calls for an entirely new way of understanding the world. He says he wrote “Down to Earth” with a “deliberate bluntness.” He vests a surprising hope in Europe, whose colonial past — or “crimes,” as he puts it — he depicts as inextricable from the migrations it tries to keep out. “Europe has invaded all peoples; all peoples are coming to Europe in their turn,” he writes. “Give and take. There is no way out of this.”

Latour also describes migration as the human embodiment of our “new climatic regime.” Under the old way of thinking, exploited peoples and places were ignored, silenced and stripped of agency; now migrants and the earth itself are both setting out “to recover what belongs to them.”

No doubt some readers will find this to be too much, too philosophical and too French. But maybe it takes a brilliantly mind-bending book like Latour’s to show that so much reality can’t be denied.

Reminder when he says above that facts rely on trust, he is talking about institutions

Why Fighting Fake News With the Facts Might Not Be Enough

Don midwest
Don midwest

Where is the democratic party? When is the democratic party? Does the democratic party exist in the space and time of the earth?

What’s The Matter With the Democratic Party? Just Watch Pelosi and Schumer Respond to Trump’s Wall Speech.

orlbucfan

Terrific read. Forwarded it to hubby. Thanks!!

Don midwest
Don midwest

Don midwest
Don midwest

Kamala Harris Tells Big Lie: That 2012 Mortgage Settlement Was a Good Deal for Homeowners

From Naked Capitalism which has links at the top of the story

Background: Why the National Mortgage Settlement Was a Bank Enrichment Scheme at the Expense of Homeowners and the General Public

In fact, as we and many others, like Dean Baker, Matt Stoller, David Dayen, Marcy Wheeler, Tom Adams, and Abigail Field recounted at the time, the settlement was a sellout to banks, a “get out of liability almost free” card. Due to widespread and probably pervasive corners-cutting during the mortgage securization process, it appeared that the overwhelming majority of mortgages that had been securitized since the refi boom of 2003 had not had the mortgages conveyed to the securitization trusts as stipulated in the pooling and servicing agreements that governed these deals. Because these deals were designed to be rigid, for the ~80% that elected New York law to govern the trust, there was no way to straighten out these securitizations after the fact. Georgetown law professor called these agreements “Frankenstein contracts” and argued that what had happened was “securitization fail,” that the securitizations had never been properly formed and thus the investors had bought what amounted to legal empty bags. Mind you, someone did have the right to collect the interest and principal from the mortgages, but that “someone” didn’t appear to be the servicers acting on behalf of the securitizations

polarbear4

If anyone sees down votes from me it’s because of clumsy fingers on a phone.

EyeRound
EyeRound

I had read that Kamala backed off on the mortgage companies after she had had a consult with Obama. Don’t know if being a “game player” is going to help her out if she runs for national office.

Regarding the passage by Yves Smith that DM cited here, I wonder if Yves has ever asked herself where “rights” come from? “Mind you, someone did have the right to collect the interest and principal from mortgages [. . . .]” Really? She seems to think that Capitalism and its concomitant basis in debt, repayment, interest, etc., is as natural as rain water (just needs to be tweaked–standard liberal attitude). It’s not. It’s made by humans and can be questioned and changed by human beings. The “rights” that Yves assumes accrue to lenders actually exist only because of the state and its laws, which are also human-made institutions. When banks violate those laws, as they did in multiple ways during and after the subprime mortgage debacle, then the banks forfeit their legal protection on the basis of “rights.” Having broken the law myriad times, lenders lost their claim on rights and therefore their claim to loan repayment based on law.

They had to result to (once again) buying the state and thereby to the use of coercion against homeowners via foreclosure–which is a violent act–rather than to any appeal to their “right to collect” on debts.

Something else that Yves seems not to see is that the same appeal to “rights” protects the borrowers from fraudulent practices by banks. Borrowers have a fundamental right to be dealing with lenders who respect the state and its laws. At base, laws governing acceptable lending practices are made by the state as a means of protecting the population against those money-lenders whose “natural” greed finds a model in mobsters.

I think that this was part of what David Dayen was showing in his book on the foreclosure fraud.

Greetings and thank you to PWer’s!

Back to NC, most of that site “wants” to protect capitalism, but “reform” it. If, though, the only way to protect capitalism is to curtail your thinking about it, than that itself is the best indictment against our current system of money!

Torabs
Torabs

I stopped visiting that site for similar reasons.

Benny

Speaking of harassment…

Don midwest
Don midwest

Russia! Russia! Russia!

Trump is part of the mafia and Russians been tied in for years, but need to be clear about what part of Russia story that people are pushing..

That sophisticated, specific Russian 2016 voter targeting effort doesn’t seem to exist

Don midwest
Don midwest
Don midwest
Don midwest

Terry McAuliffe, the former Democratic Governor of Virginia, recently penned an op ed where he called for “realistic” solutions to the country’s problems while leaving open the possibility of a presidential run. McAuliffe argued against tuition free college, saying that it would be inappropriate to use taxpayer money for tuition for children of well to do families. For what it’s worth, the public doesn’t seem to buy into this argument. Civis Analytics polled tuition free college for Data for Progress, and included an explicit tax increase as well as McAuliffe’s argument that the program would benefit wealthy families (as a counterargument from a Republican), but the policy had net support anyway.

What’s troubling about this argument is that it can be used against any universal program such as K-12 education, Social Security, or Medicare. There are important debates to be had about education policy, especially on how to create pathways to the middle class that do not require college at all. However, simply noting that the wealthy would benefit is not a compelling reason for why means testing might be appropriate for a particular program, and potentially undermines political support for benefits that many rely upon.

\

Democrats Are Proposing Realistic Solutions, but Terry McAuliffe Isn’t Listening

Benny

Don midwest
Don midwest

Dan Froomkin article about dems addressing many issues at once rather than one at a time

This has been obvious for years — these issues are interdependent and lead to the biggest issue, the earth, Gaia,

Progressives have a new theory of everything

The new unified theory of progressive politics is that desperately needed changes along an entire spectrum of otherwise unrelated issues are all dependent on the same thing: reducing the way money and intense partisanship interfere with the fundamental exercise of democracy.

A variety of leaders from among the 125 national groups who have joined a coalition supporting H.R. 1 spoke on Capitol Hill on Wednesday in support of the bill, which would enact small-donor funding for elections while ending secret money, voter suppression, extreme partisan gerrymandering and flawed government ethics rules.

It was hardly a surprise to see Fred Wertheimer, the dean of the campaign-finance reform movement, in attendance.

But what was Debbie Sease, federal campaigns and legislative director of the Sierra Club, doing there?

“The Sierra Club is an environmental organization,” Sease said. “We care passionately about clean air, clean water, finding solutions to climate change — so you might say, ‘Why would the Sierra Club think that the We the People Act, HR 1, is the single most important thing that we may do this Congress for the environment’?”

Don midwest
Don midwest

Donald Trump voters: We like the president’s lies

This link was tweeted by Thomas Drake who reminded us that Hannah Arendt said that many German’s loved Hitler’s lies

Don midwest
Don midwest

Marcy Wheeler, posting as emptywheel, continues on her exhaustive treatment of the Muller investigation. A few years ago I stopped following her on twitter because she had so many tweets. She has about 10 tweets already this morning. I follow her on a direct twitter feed – “emptywheel twitter” not on my regular twitter feed. Separate tab on the browswer

She has a series of 5 tweets which finish with this one. Maniford has already plead to lying on several topics, but then there is this one

It is clear that he lied to cover for Trump but why is he still facing life in prison and not talking about this? Is it the problem with dealing with mafia like entities that could risk assignation of people you know, or your family?

On the top line I noticed that Marcy has posted 242K tweets and now has 157K twitter followers. By weak memory I would say that in the last couple of months she went up about 10K followers. That would include world wide news followers and news organizations.

Who said that a PhD in literature was useless?

magsview

tbh, I unfollowed @emptywheel because she’s obsessed with Trump and Russia. She used to be more well-rounded.

humphrey

It is true. Her style is unique and she pulls no punches. Unfortunately she has sunk her teeth into something that could prove to be a false flag.

polarbear4

Jennifer Cohn is similar, but I still follow bc she is spot on with voting machines. I was surprised to learn that she is not a Bernie Bro.

Benny

House bill that would treat marijuana like alcohol named ‘HR 420’ in nod to cannabis culture

Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-Ore.) introduced a bill this week that would remove marijuana from the list of controlled substances and numbered it “H.R. 420” in a nod to cannabis culture.

The bill introduced Wednesday, dubbed the “Regulate Marijuana like Alcohol Act” calls for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosive to be in charge of regulating the drug.

“While the bill number may be a bit tongue-in-cheek, the issue is very serious,” Blumenauer told the Willamette Weekly. “Our federal marijuana laws are outdated, out of touch and have negatively impacted countless lives. Congress cannot continue to be out of touch with a movement that a growing majority of Americans support. It’s time to end this senseless prohibition.”

The “420” number in the bill is a reference to the date April 20, which is popular among pot enthusiasts.

As founder and co-chair of the Congressional Cannabis Caucus, Blumenauer has long been an advocate for changing federal marijuana laws.

Oregon was one of the first states to legalize recreational weed, and if the substance is decriminalized or legalized at the federal level, the state would be in prime position with a surplus of product and resources to support a growing industry.

Marijuana is currently considered a Schedule 1 drug by the federal government, meaning it has “no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse.”

The classification groups pot along with other drugs such as heroin and LSD.

States such as Oregon and California have used the “420” tag on bills seeking to reduce regulations on marijuana.

Would not be surprised if Bill Maher slipped Blumenauer a check.

LieparDestin

LieparDestin

I hope Ojeda gets to be in the debates

Benny

In a way, I wish he would run 3rd party just to tear up Der Herr at a debate.

magsview

Did you hear that $85,000 was raised at TOP to buy Pelosi heaps of roses? Is Markos a secret Democratic Socialist?? (and wow, what a waste of money. downright sad)

TheLeftistheCenter

What a joke, he sells his soul to the establishment and even buys it flowers and you can see she still doesn’t want him a round, hes just a useful idiot to them.

polarbear4

Moved.

orlbucfan

Seconded. Wonder if that’s a business write-off?

Benny

He got a free RT ticket to DC too out of it to obtain his photo-op.

polarbear4

orlbucfan

Pence: the patient cross-shaped tick on tRump’s butt.

polarbear4

humphrey

Did I notice a few yellow vests in the crowd?

humphrey

Since we have had recent links to other website articles I have a suggestion.

The story in itself is interesting but it is the comments that prove to be very insightful and are worth a read.

https://caucus99percent.com/content/russia-gates-hidden-agenda

Some of them involve a subject with regards to NewsGard which was brought to my attention by pb4.

humphrey

In a somewhat related tangent we have this.

humphrey

Benny

h/t C99 : https://caucus99percent.com/content/markos-dailykos-getting-barbecued-twitter-0#comments

orlbucfan

NewsGuard is also tagged in NC. They sound like bad news!

polarbear4

Love these newfangled things.

OzoneTom
OzoneTom

Yes, I was able to play with one of these at the Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport Oregon when visiting family after the Thanksgiving holiday.

If you create a basin and hold your hand a foot or so above that will cause “rain” filling the basin.

polarbear4

Fun!!!

polarbear4

humphrey

polarbear4

magsview

For your mid-afternoon humor (sort of) break:

magsview

one of the comments under the tweet:

Fred Trump the slumlord, reviled by many in NYC back then. Woody Guthrie wrote him into a song back in 1950.

A Story About Fred Trump and Woody Guthrie for the Midterm Elections

In 1950, Woody Guthrie moved into an apartment at Beach Haven, a cluster of sixteen residential buildings in Gravesend, Brooklyn, just a few minutes from the creaky boardwalk and frankfurter stands at Coney Island Beach. The complex was owned and operated by Fred Trump, which means that, for the two years Guthrie lived and wrote there, Trump was his landlord.

In the nineteen-seventies, Fred Trump was accused by the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Justice Department of creating a “substantial impediment to the full enjoyment of equal opportunity” at Beach Haven; it appeared that he didn’t like to rent apartments to black people.

Guthrie didn’t much like the place—he took to calling it “Bitch Havens” in his correspondence—and, in 1954, he wrote a delightfully scornful song about Trump’s discriminatory rental policies.

I suppose
Old Man Trump knows
Just how much
Racial Hate
He stirred up
In the bloodpot of human hearts
When he drawed
That color line

And this aside from the same New Yorker article is especially for our polarbear (but good for me too):

Guthrie clung to an optimistic belief in the generosity and decency of all human beings. In the end, he believed, we would surely do right by one another. In 2013, Jay Farrar, Jim James, Will Johnson, and Anders Parker recorded a version of an unfinished Guthrie song called “Hoping Machine”

Whatever you do, wherever you go
Don’t lose your grip on life and that means
Don’t let any earthy calamity knock your dreamer and your hoping machine
Out of order

polarbear4

My dreamer and my hope machine—-a good reminder.

polarbear4

Great find.

humphrey

humphrey

magsview

Remember that young lady Greta Thunberg? She’s inspiring young people around the world:

(Waterloo in Ontario, Canada)

And it looks like she’s going to Davos:

Benny

Bunch of millionaires & pols gather to listen to the girl on the train.

polarbear4

Would love to see Greta and AOC meet

humphrey

I wonder if oil and arms sales had something to do with this?🙄

humphrey

humphrey

I guess that he is vying for the votes of dentists.

I don’t think that this is from The Onion.

Benny

That’s TMI…and the Enquirer will use it to no good.

humphrey

Hopefully more states will follow this.

Washington state will create a streamlined system to pardon people convicted of misdemeanor marijuana possession before the drug was legal, under an initiative launched on Friday by Governor Jay Inslee, who is considering a run for U.S. president.

magsview

LieparDestin

Benny

polarbear4

I don’t think he even mentioned Bernie’s response.

polarbear4

Dang.

Benny

polarbear4

I hope it’s more votes against it.

Benny

I Was Sexually Harassed on Bernie Sanders’s 2016 Campaign. I Will Not Be Weaponized or Dismissed.

As was the case throughout the 2016 campaign season, my personal experiences as a woman of color were sublimated to serve an establishment media narrative that pretends the progressive movement is all white, all male, and runs counter to the interests of women and people of color.

But my story should not be taken to confirm the “Bernie bro” mythology. It should be taken to confirm the pervasiveness of sexism in professional life and distill the hard truths that all campaigns should learn from.

It’s not as if the Sanders campaign alone is nursing the last vestiges of sexism and sexual harassment in the political sphere. Both were reportedly features of Hillary Clinton’s 2008 presidential campaign. During her first run at the White House, Clinton’s campaign chose to retain a senior adviser who reportedly harassed a young woman repeatedly rather than fire him. And just last month, an aide for Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., resigned after it was reported that he settled a sexual harassment lawsuit for $400,000.

Politics reflect society’s general problem with sexism, sexual harassment, and sexual assault. As a whole, our country does not believe, respect, or even like women as much as men. Our president has bragged about sexually assaulting women and made countless demeaning comments about their physical appearances. Two out of 9 Supreme Court justices have been accused of sexual misconduct. One in 3 women have experienced some form sexual violence. A nonprofit administered an online survey last January and found that 81 percent of women have experienced some form of sexual harassment. The numbers and stakes are even higher for women of color and transgender women.

It’s not surprising, then, that these systemic problems infect political campaigns — especially since those calling the shots are mostly male, white, and disconnected from the working class. In my experience, women hired as strategists or managers are frequently treated like assistants and translators. Men often pass off our ideas as their own and “put us in our place” if we are too assertive.

It’s the classic double-bind: We are not smart enough or too smart; not attractive enough or too attractive; not dressed appropriately or dressed too nicely; not poor enough or too poor; not confident enough or too arrogant; not likable or too female. To be a woman in politics is to be held to an unattainable standard of perfection. To be a woman of color is even harder. When we see women like Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez overcome the odds against her, set these expectations on fire, and score impressive accomplishments like getting the media and Democratic leadership to take a Green New Deal seriously, we should rejoice. But even she’s not immune.

AFTER THE NEW York Times story, I was hoping to see a more productive discussion about the insidiousness of sexual harassment and sexism in politics. In sharing my experiences, I was hoping to highlight this issue for all future campaigns and celebrate the power of women organizers who worked together and successfully got the attention of Sanders and his team. But that’s not what happened.

For one, the corporate media unfairly focused on Sanders — casting the harassment that happened within his campaign much differently than similar cases with other campaigns — implicating his personal ethics in a way that they’ve declined to do with other politicians.

This is a more introspective look.

polarbear4

Good for her. This is brave.

I still wonder how a sharp political operative didn’t see this coming, though. As someone on Twitter said, it’s ironically tragic.

magsview

Thanks Benny, but I think the toothpaste is already out of the tube.

She HAS been weaponized. She was used. I saw three new articles this morning ‘reporting’ Bernie’s apology.

polarbear4

polarbear4
polarbear4

You know which one I picked.

orlbucfan

Give me a N!!
Give me an I!!
Give me a N!!
Give me an A!!
What’s that spell?
NINA!! (has my vote) 🙂

polarbear4

polarbear4

Snap!

It’s because Weaver stepped down.

(BTW, is this the right way to use “snap”?)

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