HomeBernie Sanders3/7 News Roundup & Open Thread – Sanders Responds To Trump’s News Travel Ban, The Rise with Standing Rock Native Nations March & More
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SparkyGump

Every time Bernie opens his mouth, truth & wisdom comes out. He’s not just a politician, he’s a modern day statesman. America needs many, many more of him…pronto.

jcitybone

Bernie calls Trump a LIAR because Trump does lie all the time. And those lies can be verified. Another worthless “both sides do it” opinion piece.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2017/03/06/the-sorry-state-of-political-discourse-right-now-in-five-bernie-sanders-tweets/?utm_term=.ef39de496864

Let’s start with the tweets, which Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) (and/or his staff) fired off late Monday morning:

Do me a quick favor. Hit pause on your temptation to either cheer or jeer what Sanders said and let this marinate: A prominent U.S. senator just described the president of the United States as a frequent and “shameless” liar, a claim that for reasons I’ll explain is difficult to prove. What’s more, what Sanders said about President Trump is one of a bazillion hefty criticisms that Democrats have lobbed and will lob at the president this week alone.

Here’s the problem with using the “L” word in politics, though. To say someone’s lying suggests that you know they don’t believe what they’re saying.

It’s possible Trump believes the allegations he’s making, which seem to have surfaced on a conservative news site one of his top aides used to manage. Several top House Republicans haven’t brushed off the wiretapping claims, with Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), chair of the House Intelligence Committee, saying he’ll look into it.

Some top Democrats, like Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.), also aren’t so sure Trump is intentionally distorting what he believes to be true.

All of that is why we in the media are careful not to call Trump a “liar.” But top Democrats like Sanders feel no such hesitation. In their mind, the president has become so unhinged that they have no choice but to accuse him of lying “shamelessly,” corrosive effects on political discourse be damned. If you’re a Democrat, they were already up in smoke anyway.

SparkyGump

I guess it IS possible Trump believes his lies but it’s way more possible Trump is and always has been a bullshit artist who found a way to con the gullible, hateful element of our society.

jcitybone

Bernie’s reply to the column calling him out in the Post

http://www.facebook.com/notes/us-senator-bernie-sanders/what-should-we-do-if-the-president-is-a-liar/10155702661297908

We face a very serious political problem in this country, and that problem is manifested in a post written yesterday by Amber Phillips of The Washington Post. In her piece, Phillips criticizes me for lowering the state of our political discourse, because I accused the president of being a “liar.”

What should a United States senator, or any citizen, do if the president is a liar? Does ignoring this reality benefit the American people? Do we make a bad situation worse by disrespecting the president of the United States? Or do we have an obligation to say that he is a liar to protect America’s standing in the world and people’s trust in our institutions?

I happen to strongly believe in civil political discourse. The vast majority of people in Congress who hold views different than mine are not liars. It is critical we have strong, fact-based debates on the important issues facing our country and that we respect people who come to different conclusions. In a democracy people will always have honestly held different points of view.

But how does one respond to a president who has complete disregard for reality and who makes assertions heard by billions of people around the world that have no basis in fact?

I find it interesting that Ms. Phillips did not take issue with my facts. Her complaint appears to be that it is improper for a United States senator to state the obvious. And that is that we have a president who either lies intentionally or, even more frighteningly, does not know the difference between lies and truth.

What do you think?

It is easy to know how we respond to a president with whom we disagree on many, many issues. I disagree with Trump’s support for repealing the Affordable Care Act.
I disagree with Trump’s plan to give huge tax breaks to billionaires. I disagree with Trump’s appointment of an anti-environmental EPA administrator. I disagree with Trump’s appointments of major Wall Street executives to key economic positions and his plans to loosen regulations on Wall Street designed to protect consumers. And on and on and on! These strong policy disagreements are a normal part of the political process. He has his views. I have mine.

But how do we deal with a president who makes statements that reverberate around our country and the world that are not based on fact or evidence? What is the appropriate way to respond to that? And if the media and political leaders fail to call lies what they are, are they then guilty of misleading the public?

What are your views on this extremely important issue? I look forward to your comments.

jcitybone

Bernie replies to Washington Post columnist

http://www.facebook.com/notes/us-senator-bernie-sanders/what-should-we-do-if-the-president-is-a-liar/10155702661297908

We face a very serious political problem in this country, and that problem is manifested in a post written yesterday by Amber Phillips of The Washington Post. In her piece, Phillips criticizes me for lowering the state of our political discourse, because I accused the president of being a “liar.”

What should a United States senator, or any citizen, do if the president is a liar? Does ignoring this reality benefit the American people? Do we make a bad situation worse by disrespecting the president of the United States? Or do we have an obligation to say that he is a liar to protect America’s standing in the world and people’s trust in our institutions?

I happen to strongly believe in civil political discourse. The vast majority of people in Congress who hold views different than mine are not liars. It is critical we have strong, fact-based debates on the important issues facing our country and that we respect people who come to different conclusions. In a democracy people will always have honestly held different points of view.

But how does one respond to a president who has complete disregard for reality and who makes assertions heard by billions of people around the world that have no basis in fact?

I find it interesting that Ms. Phillips did not take issue with my facts. Her complaint appears to be that it is improper for a United States senator to state the obvious. And that is that we have a president who either lies intentionally or, even more frighteningly, does not know the difference between lies and truth.

What do you think?

It is easy to know how we respond to a president with whom we disagree on many, many issues. I disagree with Trump’s support for repealing the Affordable Care Act. I disagree with Trump’s plan to give huge tax breaks to billionaires. I disagree with Trump’s appointment of an anti-environmental EPA administrator. I disagree with Trump’s appointments of major Wall Street executives to key economic positions and his plans to loosen regulations on Wall Street designed to protect consumers. And on and on and on! These strong policy disagreements are a normal part of the political process. He has his views. I have mine.

But how do we deal with a president who makes statements that reverberate around our country and the world that are not based on fact or evidence? What is the appropriate way to respond to that? And if the media and political leaders fail to call lies what they are, are they then guilty of misleading the public?

What are your views on this extremely important issue? I look forward to your comments.

Benny

I applaud Bernie for calling the situation as it merits.

It’s incredible, all of the throwbacks of what the pandora’s box that the R’s have opened. I must say I didn’t expect our country to deteriorate in legislation as quickly as it has. We have no choice but to keep speaking out.

jcitybone

Trumpcare–Bribery and WTF?

6 things you should know about Trumpcare

It includes a big tax break for insurance companies that pay their CEOs more than $500,000 per year.
One provision in the House GOP’s proposed Obamacare replacement plan would essentially incentivize major corporations to overpay their top executives — offering a tax break to insurers that pay CEOs more than half a million dollars per year.

A significant portion of the bill is devoted to ensuring lottery winners don’t have access to Medicaid.
One of the most bizarre inclusions in the legislation is a provision that would prevent lottery winners from being able to remain covered by the Medicaid program. The 66-page document spends seven of those pages detailing this policy change.

Benny

phatkhat

In a move scientists say may hinder accurate weather forecasting and warnings and put American lives at risk, the Trump administration intends to slash the budget of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Weather Service (NWS), according to the Washington Post.

https://www.wunderground.com/news/noaa-budget-cuts

Interesting read – and some of the scientists who commented pulled no punches. I especially liked this one:

Titley noted that while he has not seen the budget document, cuts to the Sea Grant and other educational programs “is evidence of the war on education and knowledge.”

“There seems to be an attempt to decapitate the next generation of ocean policy professionals,” Titley said. “Perhaps the administration is afraid of the knowledge they will gain and their work to preserve functioning coastal ecosystems.”

The idea of the weather forecasters losing their ability to forecast accurately in advance scares the hell out of me. And yes, I had to go to the storm cellar again last night.

Benny

Wikileaks Releases CIA Documents “Vault7” Which Entail How They Hack Phones, Smart TV & Other Devices (aka the Internet of Things)

WikiLeaks said the documents, which it called Vault 7, had been “circulated among former U.S. government hackers and contractors in an unauthorized manner, one of whom has provided WikiLeaks with portions of the archive.”

WikiLeaks said the source, in a statement, set out policy questions that “urgently need to be debated in public, including whether the C.I.A.’s hacking capabilities exceed its mandated powers and the problem of public oversight of the agency.” The source, the group said, “wishes to initiate a public debate about the security, creation, use, proliferation and democratic control of cyberweapons.”

The documents, from the C.I.A’s Center for Cyber Intelligence, are dated from 2013 to 2016, and WikiLeaks described them as “the largest ever publication of confidential documents on the agency.” One former intelligence officer who briefly reviewed the documents on Tuesday morning said some of the code names for C.I.A. programs, an organization chart and the description of a C.I.A. hacking base appeared to be genuine.

A C.I.A. spokesman, Dean Boyd, said, “We do not comment on the authenticity or content of purported intelligence documents.”

WikiLeaks, which has sometimes been accused of recklessly leaking information that could do harm, said it had redacted names and other identifying information from the collection. It said it was not releasing the computer code for actual, usable cyberweapons “until a consensus emerges on the technical and political nature of the C.I.A.’s program and how such ‘weapons’ should be analyzed, disarmed and published.”

Some of the details of the C.I.A. programs might have come from the plot of a spy novel for the cyberage, revealing numerous highly classified — and in some cases, exotic — hacking programs. One, code-named Weeping Angel, uses Samsung “smart” televisions as covert listening devices. According to the WikiLeaks news release, even when it appears to be turned off, the television “operates as a bug, recording conversations in the room and sending them over the internet to a covert C.I.A. server.”

More here:

Benny

Chaffetz: Americans should forgo new iPhone to afford healthcare

House Oversight Committee Chairman Jason Chaffetz said Monday that the healthcare plan rolled out Monday by House Republicans will offer Americans at all income levels the opportunity to afford healthcare.

They just might have to sacrifice buying their next cell phone to do so.

“Well, we’re getting rid of the individual mandate. We’re getting rid of those things that people said that they don’t want. And you know what? Americans have choices. And they’ve got to make a choice,” Chaffetz (R-Utah) said on CNN’s “New Day.” “And so maybe rather than getting that new iPhone that they just love and they want to go spend hundreds of dollars on that, maybe they should invest in their own health care. They’ve got to make those decisions themselves.”

The healthcare legislation unveiled Monday by House GOP members marks a major step forward by Republicans in keeping their longtime promise to repeal and replace former President Barack Obama’s signature healthcare legislation, the Affordable Care Act.

http://www.politico.com/story/2017/03/jason-chaffetz-new-gop-health-care-plan-235762

Granted cell phones aren’t cheap these days, but I heard on Democracy Now the tax break for the 1% (or as Bernie would say, 1/10 of the 1%) would get out of the #TrumpNoCare plan is about $7M per household.

Benny

Apparently, the rep gets his iPhone and usage for free:

phatkhat

This was sent to me in an email. It’s from – ahem – The Daily Caller, but it is worth a read. (Even a broken clock is right a couple of times a day.)

Former Hospital President: Republican Health ‘Reform’ Is Like Paying $500,000 For A Junker

The Republican health reform plan revealed Monday afternoon suffers the same fatal flaw as Obamacare, mistakenly focusing on the cost of insurance. It’s like getting financing so you can afford to pay $500,000 for a junked automobile. Only big government shops this way.

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