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polarbear4LieparDestinwi62jcityboneorlbucfan Recent comment authors

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Benny

I discovered this from a rose Tweeter:

lol. Makes me wonder how many other Ninos are out there with Nina as their namesake?

Benny

TPW’s el Nino!

El Nino 2 Screenshot 2020-12-22 181257.jpg
polarbear4

must be a birdie loving kitty.

Benny

I wouldn’t go that far. His favorite toy has feathers on it (one of those you can tease the pootie with) and he loves chasing it. However, he is getting into ornithological studies via the big windows in the house. 🙂

polarbear4

i was just thinking that as the birdie nest kitty here…. :O)

Benny

polarbear4

and both fiery little things. :O)

Benny

polarbear4

https://theconversation.com/martin-luther-king-jr-union-man-110004

In 1934, San Francisco longshoremen – who were non-union since employers had crushed their union in 1919 – reorganized and led a coast-wide “Big Strike.”

In the throes of the Great Depression, these increasingly militant and radicalized dockworkers walked off the job. After 83 days on strike, they won a huge victory: wage increases, a coast-wide contract and union-controlled hiring halls.

Soon, these “wharf rats,” among the region’s poorest and most exploited workers, became “lords of the docks,” commanding the highest wages and best conditions of any blue-collar worker in the region.

At its inception, Local 10’s membership was 99 percent white. But Harry Bridges, the union’s charismatic leader, joined with fellow union radicals to commit to racial equality in its ranks.

Originally from Australia, Bridges started working on the San Francisco waterfront in the early 1920s. It was during the Big Strike that he emerged as a leader.

Bridges coordinated during the strike with C.L. Dellums, the leading black unionist in the Bay Area, and made sure the handful of black dockworkers would not cross picket lines as replacement workers. Bridges promised they would get a fair deal in the new union. One of the union’s first moves after the strike was integrating work gangs that previously had been segregated.

Local 10 overcame pervasive discrimination
Cleophas Williams, a black man originally from Arkansas, was among those who got into Local 10 in 1944. He belonged to a wave of African-Americans who, due to the massive labor shortage caused by World War II, fled the racism and discriminatory laws of the Jim Crow South for better lives – and better jobs – outside of it. Hundreds of thousands of blacks moved to the Bay Area, and tens of thousands found jobs in the booming shipbuilding industry.

Black workers in shipbuilding experienced pervasive discrimination. Employers shunted them off into less attractive jobs and paid them less. Similarly, the main shipbuilders’ union proved hostile to black workers who, when allowed in, were placed in segregated locals.

A few thousand black men, including Williams, were hired as longshoremen during the war. He later recalled to historian Harvey Schwartz: “When I first came on the waterfront, many black workers felt that Local 10 was a utopia.”

During the war, when white foremen and military officers hurled racist epithets at black longshoremen, this union defended them. Black members received equal pay and were dispatched the same as all others.

A gang of welders at the Marinship yard, Sausalito, California, in around 1943. National Park Service
For Williams, this union was a revelation. Literally the first white people he ever met who opposed white supremacy belonged to Local 10. These longshoremen were not simply anti-racists, they were communists and socialists.

Leftist unions like the ILWU embraced black workers because, reflecting their ideology, they contended workers were stronger when united. They also knew that, countless times, employers had broken strikes and destroyed unions by playing workers of different ethnicities, genders, nationalities and races against each other. For instance, when 350,000 workers went out during the mammoth Steel Strike of 1919, employers brought in tens of thousands of African-Americans to work as replacements.

Some black dockworkers also were socialists. Paul Robeson, the globally famous singer, actor and left-wing activist had several friends, fellow socialists, in Local 10. Robeson was made an honorary ILWU member during WWII.

more at the link.

Aint Supposed to Die A Natural Death
Aint Supposed to Die A Natural Death

Very interesting. The name Dellums (“Bridges coordinated during the strike with C.L. Dellums, the leading black unionist in the Bay Area”) reminded me that we had a black congressman named Ron Dellums so I googled him. He was from the Bay Area also. I wonder if he’s related to this early black union organizer.

polarbear4

good chance, i’d say. cool.

Benny

https://youtu.be/8L3MVSmEVE4

AOC was a guest on TRMS last night. Her appearance starts at about the 12 min mark in this video.

Benny

wi62

He should stick to X’s and O’s where he’s somewhat competent’ He’ll be the atypical R yes turtle i’ll vote yes on what ever you tell me to…

Benny

@liepardestin

Benny

Benny

Benny

wi62

Trumpism = Fascism so yes its an on going battle to keep it at bay. The scary part is when people wrap the flag around it and elect people to office

polarbear4

deleted. for some reason, the actual video didn’t show until i refreshed. ty

Benny

AOC TH

Benny