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wi62NYCVGorlbucfanBennyphatkhat Recent comment authors

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la58

la58

https://forloveofwater.org/line5/ A lot of info about Line 5.

polarbear4

polarbear4

jcitybone

Great but McConnell is running the show in the Senate.

Aint Supposed to Die A Natural Death
Aint Supposed to Die A Natural Death

And in “shoot em in the leg” Biden’s presidency.

phatkhat

Which is very convenient for Pelousy, et al. None of the establishment gives a flying fuck about the rest of us. With a very few progressive exceptions, Congress is one big party, each pointing fingers at the other team, but it’s all INTRAmural sports. They’re all in the same club.

NONE of them want to give US anything. It’s a huge grift for them. All of them are rich, and they don’t want anything to change. The only way it will is from the bottom up, and Bernie and his young army understand this. I hope I live to see the change, but probably won’t.

polarbear4

same. “ I hope I live to see the change, but probably won’t.”

wi62

I’ve made peace with myself on that to. so i’ll be a contrarian to the neolibcons and vote against them every chance i get.

polarbear4

jcitybone

A little reckless after 10pm?

This wave of Covid definitely started spiking in places that have mostly refused to follow basic precautions and is now spreading everywhere from there.

Agreed that along with precautions there needs to be material support. The Republican Senate is making sure that the support is not there.

humphrey

I guess that you can thank the DSCC and Joe’s long coattails for being in this situation.

jcitybone

Personally, I’m going to thank all those voters who think Trump and a Republican Congress are just fine. Vote for Republicans—expect little COVID relief. But I guess saving the country from defunding the police, socialism, and the brown hordes are just much more important.

humphrey

Aint Supposed to Die A Natural Death
Aint Supposed to Die A Natural Death

👍🏾👍🏾👍🏾

wi62

The R’s in this state were already cult like, All it took was trumpcorp to solidify it here. The state Assembly and Senate are basically fascist entities with little hope for change here. Were Gerrymandered to death and i doubt ill live to see it change.

orlbucfan

They are getting plenty of help from jokers like Manchin, etc.

wi62

Manchin should just make it official and place the R behind his name

polarbear4

and joe is signaling “no lockdown.”

phatkhat

His one advisor recommends 4-6 week lockdown with the govt footing the bill. This is probably the ONLY think that will actually work – has worked in other countries. The rest are more concerned with the ECONOMY. A COVID on them.

polarbear4

good to know there is 1

polarbear4

polarbear4

let me slap you in the face again.

and it’s not just progressives. the whole country said no in 2016. i knew she had a big hand in all this. thought she’d be content with the background.

jcitybone

Remember that right now we have no idea who Biden is really “considering” for anything.

humphrey

One thing you can be pretty sure of that progressives will have little or no presence in his cabinet.

Benny

The only progressive org I saw on the Biden Transition teams was a writer for Grist. Grist is a good blog, but why not Bill McKibben from 360org?

wi62

x 27

phatkhat

Involving the Emanuel brothers (official or advisory) in his transition team is a pretty good indication of the direction in which he is going.

polarbear4

byt if we don’t react to assumed leaks, the appointments will be made with no or little feedback.

wi62

Byedone should make her an ambassador to Wall Street, their a country within this country anyway

jcitybone

https://www.businessinsider.com/sweden-herd-immunity-second-wave-coronavirus-cases-hospitalisations-surge-2020-11?utm_source=reddit.com

Sweden’s chief epidemiologist has admitted that the country is experiencing a second surge in coronavirus cases despite previously predicting that the number of infections in the autumn would be “quite low” due to the country’s no-lockdown policy.

“In the autumn there will be a second wave. Sweden will have a high level of immunity and the number of cases will probably be quite low,” Anders Tegnell told the Financial Times back in May.

However, the latest figures show Sweden is experiencing higher levels of infections, hospitalizations and deaths than its neighbours, relative to its population size, the Financial Times reported on Thursday.

Sweden recorded 4,658 new coronavirus cases on Thursday, according to official figures reported by Reuters, with new daily cases having surged in recent weeks.

jcitybone

With the loss of many moderates, the election of new progressives, and the adoption of new rules, the CPC has the potential to be a force in the new Congress.

Here’s the new rules. Jayapal is going to take over as the sole chair

THE CONGRESSIONAL PROGRESSIVE Caucus is restructuring in order to shape itself into a more cohesive fighting force come 2021, according to CPC members involved in designing the new strategy. A series of proposed reforms to the caucus’s leadership structure as well as membership requirements were sent to CPC members for approval on Sunday, members of the caucus said. The changes won’t go into force without two-thirds support of the current members, said CPC co-chair Rep. Pramila Jayapal of Washington.

The Progressive Caucus has grown steadily since its founding in 1991 and now includes nearly 100 Democratic members of Congress, as the “progressive” label has gained currency in recent years. That size has also paradoxically been a weakness, as the group has been unable to enforce or motivate discipline, particularly as many of those who have joined are not active in the caucus and don’t subscribe to its core tenets.

Shortly after winning her 2018 primary, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez identified the group’s size as a hindrance, suggesting a “sub-caucus” of Democrats willing to buck party leadership and take down legislation might be more effective. No sub-caucus was formed this term, but the CPC did work at times to block legislation it found insufficient, at times extracting concessions, at other times getting steamrolled. Its biggest success came on HR3, the fight over drug-pricing, when the CPC forced Pelosi to move its way by credibly threatening to take down the bill.

Jayapal said that HR3 was “definitely a significant moment” in the shaping of the CPC’s approach to organizing in the caucus, and it required not just a threat but a set of demands that were ready to go. “One of the things that’s really important in those last negotiating minutes is to drill down to a few things that are most important,” she said.

Under the current CPC rules, essentially any Democrat willing to write a small dues check — $4,000 per year — to the group political action committee can become an official member, regardless of their politics, their source of campaign financing, their voting record, or even their attendance at CPC meetings. The benefit for moderate Democrats who fear facing primary challengers from the left is that they can tout their membership as evidence of progressive bona fides without delivering anything substantive.

The proposed changes to the CPC are intended to move it in a tighter direction. “The point of the reform is to shed free riding members that claim CPC membership but aren’t actually progressive,” said one CPC member.

Jayapal said that the caucus may indeed shrink if the reforms are implemented. “It may. We’re ready for that to happen,” she said. “I just would rather have people who are really committed to the progressive caucus in the caucus and participating rather than sort of just having it as a label.”

The task force is also pushing to move from the co-chair leadership structure that has been in place since 2005, to a single chair, arguing that the CPC is at a tactical disadvantage because its two chairs must coordinate before making a move, and often quickness is essential on Capitol Hill.

Rep. Mark Pocan, D-Wisc., the other co-chair, said that, for instance, a press release may be ready to go by 10 a.m., but getting both members and their staffs to sign off amid a busy day could take until later afternoon. “And by then the press release isn’t even relevant anymore,” he said. “A lot of cooks are in the kitchen and often all we’re doing is making a grilled cheese.”

Having two co-chairs also creates opportunities for opponents to undermine the caucus, he said. “Recently we had two people from … another caucus, I’ll just say … try to divide and conquer us, by talking to us separately and seeing if they could pick one of us off,” he said. “That’s not the first time that people have tried to work one chair or the other in trying to influence the caucus.” Pocan recently announced he would not stand for re-election as co-chair; Jayapal is expected to run again.

Nearly all other caucuses have only a single chair, which was also the CPC’s structure at its founding, when it had six members and was chaired by then-Rep. Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont. Sanders was blocked early in his career from caucusing with the Democrats by southern members who didn’t want to be associated with a socialist. Indeed, the political value of the progressive label had so bottomed out that anybody who would willingly label themselves as one was presumed to be telling the truth. That’s no longer the case, as the pendulum has swung back toward the progressive end inside the Democratic Party. Today, a number of members of the CPC are also members of the New Democrats Coalition, which is an ideological rival of the CPC, built to be a bulwark against the progressive wing and in support of business interests.

Under the new rules, if a position wins two-thirds support among the CPC, members of the caucus will be expected to vote as a bloc, which would make it the first Democratic caucus to attempt to bind its members. Yet at the same time, members need only support the official position of the CPC two-thirds of the time before running afoul of the rules and risking expulsion.

Pushing CPC members to vote as a bloc is an effort to find enough strength in solidarity to make credible threats to leadership or to a potential Biden administration. On the GOP side, the Freedom Caucus has exercised its power by voting as a bloc. The difference, of course, is that the right-wing’s default posture toward government programs is one of destruction, so withholding votes is less difficult, said Pocan. It’s more difficult for progressive Democrats to say no to legislation that will benefit even a small number of people, and therein lies their negotiating handicap.

“It’s easy to tank something. It’s much harder to create something,” said Pocan. “One of the reasons that we’ve always not liked the comparison to the Freedom Caucus is they like to say ‘No.’ Quite honestly we like to say ‘yes’ to ideas, and have some ideas that we’re putting out there, and they’re just great at saying ‘No.’”

The new rules would also require CPC members to attend a certain number of meetings and to respond to whip requests, which are questions from caucus leadership about how a member feels about a particular bill or position. That such basic requirements are being written into the rules is a reflection of the current lack of participation. Some of that silence amounted to obstruction; a way to undermine a whip count was to simply ignore it. The new rules would strip the non-respondents from the denominator, meaning a member who doesn’t respond can’t jam up the process. The caucus will also require members to vote for and sponsor a certain amount of progressive legislation.

The task force set up to write the new rules included Reps. Ocasio-Cortez, Ayanna Pressley, Ilhan Omar, Jamie Raskin, Barbara Lee, Ro Khanna, Judy Chu, Lloyd Doggett, Chuy Garcia, David Cicilline, Jayapal, and Pocan. The new rules, if approved, won’t go into effect until the next Congress.

humphrey

You see for yourself and see that membership is a joke until changes are made.

There are even Blue Dogs and moles like Hakeem Jeffries are members.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Congressional_Progressive_Caucus

jcitybone

Changes go into effect in next Congress. If some members continue to fail to support what most members want, they can be kicked out.

Benny

Our new Squad will be a tour de force. Cracks me up seeing all of the lies and punching down lefties I see at TPM, TOP, etc saying how these would never win in a swing district. OK, the data does bear that out in early stages. But the point is the more we inhabit the space, the more likely the reforms and not tiny increments. And the more this is publicized, more of the younger Berner/Warner types will be encouraged to stay in the fight.

NYCVG
NYCVG

Very positive news. Thanks for sharing it!

humphrey

If this doesn’t get your dander up maybe you should check to see if you still have a pulse.🤔

phatkhat

Excellent! RT’d.

wi62

Of course it is, the people that have figured it out are few in comparison to the masses. They still buy in to the R v D war or us V them and its why the Oligarchs survive. I just hope its not to late when the masses finally do wake up

humphrey

Benny

Getting marijuana off schedule 1 is the first step, followed by medical marijuana. Recreational pot will be left to the states, I think.

I guess we should start lobbying the Veterans groups a bit more on this, since Biden always ends his speeches, may God Protect Our Troops. I see Vets lining up outside the dispensaries, along with the working class. Cost is not cheap, but it’s better than being addicted to opiates. And btw, there are more R’s developing businesses of not only CBD but the thc side of it as well. Just see who chairs the National Cannabis Roundtable.

Surely Biden will reach across the isle on this issue–if the Vets do. Hence, we need Bernie in Senate, not in Biden’s cabinet.

phatkhat

Bernie in the Senate!!! Cabinet positions are too shaky and subject to the whims of the POTUS and his donors, er… advisors.

NYCVG
NYCVG

Agree

orlbucfan

More states voted to legalize pot. What century does Byedone live in? Semi-senile idiot!

phatkhat

Well this is inspiring! And needs to be read by every establishment Democrat from Biden on down! ESPECIALLY Biden and Pelousy.

The results of the U.S. Senate race this week in Maine—won by four-term Republican Sen. Susan Collins after Democrats poured $50 million into challenger Sara Gideon’s campaign—may have given the impression that a Trumpian right-wing agenda has an iron grip on the state’s more conservative rural voters, but the victory of Democratic state Rep. Chloe Maxmin, a progressive champion who ran on the promise of a Green New Deal and offering a “politics as public service” in a strong GOP district, tells a much different story.

Two years after winning a seat in the state House of Representatives, representing conservative, rural District 88, Maxmin secured a win in her challenge to state Senate Republican Leader Dana Dow. As in her first campaign for elected office, Maxmin won over voters in state Senate District 13—where residents chose Collins over Gideon—by engaging deeply with her community and offering a platform focused on climate action, investing in universal broadband access, and treating healthcare as a human right.

“Too often we talk about these things in a partisan lens, but overwhelmingly people believe we need to tax the wealthy, that we need to raise the minimum wage, that we need sick days, paid family leave, healthcare access that’s real, that everyone can see a doctor when they need to. Those are not limited to a party. And when you build a multi-race, multi-class coalition like Chloe did… That’s how you win in those places.”
—Mike Tipping, Maine People’s Alliance

“When I talk to folks, I mostly listen, I don’t show up and talk about myself,” Maxmin told Common Dreams on Thursday. “I really try and listen and make sure that the voices that I hear are reflected in our campaign… The work that we do on our side is to really think about campaigns differently, because we see them as one of the primary ways that we can start building a new type of politics. So we didn’t use any party consultants. We designed all of our mailers, palm cards, postcards ourselves. We’re all about authentic conversation and just had dozens and dozens of volunteers writing postcards or having conversations with voters and using the same style of just listening, and not going around saying, ‘You should vote for Chloe because of this,’ but trying to understand where people are at.”

“My sense is that people really saw that we were doing it differently and that I could be in office differently, too,” she added.

When the Covid-19 pandemic hit earlier this year, the Maxmin campaign further stepped up its commitment to engaging directly with voters, enlisting 200 volunteers to check on voters’ wellbeing.

“Maxmin called upon her volunteers to reach out to every senior in her district and her network of campaign volunteers provided food, assistance with prescription drugs and identified transpiration needs,” Marie Follayttar, director of the progressive grassroots group Mainers for Accountable Leadership, told Common Dreams. “Chloe is both a community organizer and an elected official. Not only is Chloe willing to listen to the people where they are—at their dinner table or at their door—she is demonstrably responsive to their needs and leverages the organizing structure of her campaign to assist her in accomplishing mutual aid work.”

Apologies if this was posted previously, but if you haven’t read it, it’s a good read. And SHOULD be the blueprint for Dems going forward.

orlbucfan

Similar to Anna Eskamani who won re-election to the FL House by a decisive margin.