HomeUncategorized11.16-17 Open Threads and Topics

70
Leave a Reply

avatar
Photo and Image Files
 
 
 
Audio and Video Files
 
 
 
Other File Types
 
 
 
26 Comment threads
44 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
7 Comment authors
Don midwestPaul ADKorlbucfanjcityboneAint Supposed to Die A Natural Death Recent comment authors

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
polarbear4

ty orl!!! ❤️🤩🦋🌧🌛🥰🐳👠🧬🌼🐻🙏💙

polarbear4

wi63

Gives me hope for the future when i see a result like this.

wi63

If you think Byedone congnative issues are bad now they’ll be worse in 24, Basically Harris will be calling the shots provided nothing happens to Byedone before then. If the DNC props up Harris/? vs the Rs —game over for a lot of things including our experiment in Democracy?

polarbear4
polarbear4

the sad thing is that most of nation have literally been psyoped by our msm (and our vote counting system and our duopoly) to believe that this is the only way and that to vote for a third party is to court ruin.

i really hope we get a good kind of ranked choice in. iirc, the Star system is pretty good. i just don’t see enough busy, busy, propagandized people voting anything different in.

amazing and terrifying how neoliberalism took over the world without a whimper. i can’t stand it, but there it is and i suppose why i’m still here. y’all are the only ones i can still talk to.

so did everyone else switch to reddit? i have seen Ain’t Supposed To… for a while now, either. i have trouble finding things and navigating, especially on my phone over there.

Aint Supposed to Die A Natural Death
Aint Supposed to Die A Natural Death

I’m still here pb4. Depressed out of my skull. Cop26, Ahmaud Arbury, Rittenhouse, no Build Back Better – can things get any worse?

wi63

I was wondering where you were…. Glad you checked in 😀😀

polarbear4
polarbear4

i hear ya. thanks for stopping by. try to find more good stuff. Sometimes I forget that everyone here already knows how bad it is.

wi63

I go there to see some sutff that doesnt make it here but the nest is home!!

polarbear4
polarbear4

where do you go?

wi63

Reddit r politics — some of the posts can get depressing but offset by some good posts

https://www.reddit.com/r/politics/new/

wi63

Not far off

617876a2313a3.image.jpg
polarbear4
polarbear4

like the $.28 off hot dogs on July 4th! or whatever the amount was.

Paul ADK

Maybe they need another drubbing. Not that it would accomplish anything, the bought are apparently incapable of benifitting from life lessons.

polarbear4

polarbear4

polarbear4

polarbear4

nm. photo cut off.

polarbear4

polarbear4

Under current law, the relatively small number of Americans wealthy enough to itemize their tax returns are barred from writing more than $10,000 of their state and local tax levies off their federal tax returns. In 2019, that was just 13 percent of Americans.

i wonder if that $10K includes multi-year debt?

polarbear4

polarbear4

jcitybone

https://www.thenation.com/article/politics/leahy-retires/

Patrick Leahy, the longest-serving member in the United States Senate, is arguably the coolest character in the chamber. That’s no small feat. Yet Leahy will finish his eighth and final term after next year’s election as the Senate’s preeminent fan of the Grateful Dead, a comic-book consultant, and a minor star of five Batman films.

Usually when a senator ends their tenure, political longevity and legislative accomplishments distinguish them. And when Leahy announced Monday that he would not seek a ninth term, those characteristics of his career as one of the most progressive members of the Senate were well noted.

Born before the United States entered World War II, the Vermont Democrat made history when he was elected to the US Senate in 1974. For the first time since the US Constitution was amended to make way for the election of senators, the voters of Vermont chose a Democrat to represent them in the chamber: Leahy, the 34-year-old state’s attorney for Chittenden County.

For progressives, the hope is that the Democrat who replaces the retiring senator will not just maintain Leahy’s voting record on issues such as labor rights (97 percent lifetime rating from the AFL-CIO), environmental protection and climate justice (League of Conservation Voters lifetime rating: 94 percent), and reproductive rights (NARAL Pro-Choice America current rating: 100 percent) but will also adopt the more aggressively activist approach of the state’s junior senator, Bernie Sanders.

The two Vermonters have been genial colleagues. Indeed, Leahy backed Sanders for president in 2020—despite the fact that, in the 1974 election that first sent Leahy to the Senate, Sanders finished in third place as the candidate of the independent, left-wing Liberty Union Party.

Leahy and Sanders were relatively young men when they ran against each other almost five decades ago. Now, they are both senior senators. Sanders is a hero to a new generation of young activists, who formed the base for his groundbreaking 2016 and 2020 presidential bids as a democratic socialist. He is a political and a cultural icon, who is stopped on the street by teenagers who want to take selfies.

But Leahy had some cultural cred of his own. After all, he’s the guy who once took a call from the president of the United States (Bill Clinton) while on stage with the Grateful Dead.

“Would I call myself a Deadhead? With pride,” wrote Leahy several years ago, in a Life magazine special issue on the iconic West Coast band.

That wasn’t an attempt by an aging politician to make a connection with the generations of music fans that embraced the band that rock critic (and Patti Smith band guitarist) Lenny Kaye wrote produced “music [that] touches on ground that most other groups don’t even know exists.”

Leahy knew that ground. He wrote about it in nuanced ways, describing the “different layers” of favorite songs, especially “Black Muddy River,” that he listened to in his Senate office while working alone late at night. And he knew the band. Indeed, in the mid-1990s he hosted the Dead’s Jerry Garcia, Bob Weir, Phil Lesh, and Mickey Hart at a luncheon in the Senate Dining Room. South Carolina Senator Strom Thurmond wandered by and said to Garcia: “I’m the oldest member of the United States Senate, you hear me, boy?” Garcia said after meeting Thurmond, “You know, I never had an experience anywhere like that, even when I used to drop acid.”

Leahy is not only a Deadhead. He is an accomplished photographer whose pictures are cherished by fellow members. And he is something of a movie star.

Leahy made repeated cameo appearances in Batman films, beginning with 1995’s Batman Forever. He also contributed an introduction to a 1996 DC Comics book dealing with land mines, as well as a foreword to the lavish 2019 anthology, Detective Comics: 80 Years of Batman (Deluxe Edition), He even found a moral grounding in the Batman story.

“The Batman prevailed through superior intellect and detective skills, through the freedoms afforded by great wealth and through sheer will,” Leahy wrote, using the original reference to the character. “Not superpowers, but skill, science and rationality.”

Leahy earned accolades and acting credits for his appearances. He even got a shout-out from Ben Affleck, who played Batman in Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice, a film where the Vermonter portrayed a US senator. Appearing before the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Diplomacy and National Security to encourage US diplomatic and financial support for efforts to address conflicts in Africa—an issue in which Leahy had long taken an interest—Affleck said, “To Senator Leahy, I would be remiss if I did not acknowledge my co-star in Batman. The role is marginally smaller than mine, but I understand you’re quite good.”

That wasn’t the only time Leahy found an intersection between his cultural and political interests. In 1996, the senator worked with DC Comics to develop Batman: Death of Innocents: The Horror of Landmines, a graphic novel that highlighted the threat posed by land mines. As the Senate’s most ardent advocate for international efforts to ban the production, export, and use of antipersonnel land mines, Leahy recalled, he placed that comic book “on the desk of every U.S. Senator in the U.S. Senate.”

jcitybone

polarbear4
polarbear4

Paul ADK

That judge is a massive enabler, who isn’t fit to serve on any bench. So, did they use colored paper, for the non- white potential jurors?

polarbear4
polarbear4

polarbear4
polarbear4

jcitybone

Boston fared a lot better in their mayoral race than did NYC, which is stuck with Adams.

polarbear4
polarbear4

I saw that and almost wondered how that happened. But we have miles to go, I know