HomeActivismgrassroots12/16 News Roundup and OT
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polarbear4

ruh ro


just sharing, haven’t listened to either one, yet.

polarbear4

jcitybone

Dore attacks “sellout” David Sirota

orlbucfan

Why is Dore attacking Sirota? Sirota has built his progressive cred for over 20 years. Dore comes off as some hysterical vidiot.

phatkhat
phatkhat

I have a succinct answer for Sirota: Because never in a million years will Biden do such a thing, no matter whether he could or not. This is gonna be an upward fight, not a “gift” from above.

orlbucfan

Yeah, but what’s the deal with Dore? To people like me who don’t follow Twitter or watch a lot of video, he comes across as a hysteric at times. The FRighties and their media whores jump on that like stink on sh1t.

Aint Supposed to Die A Natural Death
Aint Supposed to Die A Natural Death

I found Dore hard to take when he was on the Turks and I definitely couldn’t take him when he started his own show. Can’t stand the way he attacks actual progressives and his jokes aren’t even funny. When he finishes taking AOC down, what are we left with? Dore? No thanks.

polarbear4

yeah. from the looks of it, he could really use AA. apparently he’s noticeably drunk on his show at times.

polarbear4

Dore is a jerk, at this point. Especially when he goes into attacking progs. He can be useful, though, as can his regulars. Chris Richards is also veering into strident black and whitism. I might quit following him. I argue, politely, with him sometimes.

Sometimes, these youngish guys get a platform and it seems to go to their head.

But I did think that his list of people who support fighting for M4A was interesting.

Torabs
Torabs

I wouldn’t go so far as to say Sirota’s running interference, but that is a terrible tweet. Why the hell he would engage in left-bashing at this juncture is beyond me, and shows terrible judgment. Setting up a straw man that somehow pushing for a floor vote takes pressure off Biden to do the right thing? What kind of propaganda bullshit is he on?

Torabs
Torabs

Don’t know him, but I share his disappointment. For Ocasio-Cortez to be so fixated on what we can’t do is appalling.

polarbear4

the machines are fine.

polarbear4

polarbear4

too late to delete. if you want to, Benny, it would be fine. didn’t notice that it was the first tweet above. if not, well emphasis. :o)

polarbear4

I agree with AOC and i just started the article:

If progressives do threaten to withhold their support from Pelosi, Ocasio-Cortez said, their demand shouldn’t be merely for a floor vote on Medicare for All, which is sure to fail. Instead, she believes, progressives should fight some of the bigger structural obstacles in the way of Medicare for All, like pay-go, an austerity provision that makes it difficult for Democrats to pass more ambitious policies, or replacing conservative Democratic Rep. Richie Neal as head of the Ways and Means Committee. “We are currently negotiating to get and work towards real material concessions for the left that can move things into place, to help build power for the next two years,” she said.

polarbear4

like if someone said you can have a completely, truly transparent voting process or M4A right now, I would choose the voting process. same for money out of politics. doing the procedural stuff isn’t glamorous, but it opens the door for tons of the good stuff to flood through.

jcitybone

I’m all for replacing Neal!

LieparDestin

Dems side with GOP in protecting wall street hurts far more elections than activists trying to save Black Lives, so wont be surprised when they ignore the pleas of the the two candidates we are told ‘will save democracy’

https://thehill.com/policy/finance/530382-democrats-see-stimulus-checks-as-winning-issue-in-georgia-runoffs

Stimulus checks have emerged as a key issue in the runoffs for two Senate seats in Georgia that will determine which party controls the upper chamber.

The two Democratic candidates, the Rev. Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff, are both arguing that Congress needs to include direct payments to Americans in coronavirus relief legislation. Ossoff in particular is emphasizing the topic while drawing attention to comments that his opponent, Sen. David Perdue (R-Ga.), has made in the past that are critical of direct payments.

Stimulus payments have been popular with the public, and Democrats are hoping that highlighting the issue could help them with voter turnout.

“This might be the kind of appeal that might motivate voters to go to the polls,” said Charles Bullock, a political science professor at the University of Georgia.

..

Both Ossoff and Warnock in recent days have been calling on Congress to pass a coronavirus relief package this year that includes direct payments to Americans.

“David and Kelly should be in Washington delivering $1,200 checks for every single Georgian, and $500 for every child in this state, because people are hurting and we need help now,” Ossoff said at a rally on Tuesday that also featured Biden.

“We’re fed up with @KLoeffler’s failure. I will vote for direct stimulus checks to Georgians,” Warnock tweeted on Saturday.

jcitybone

The fact that it has emerged as a key issue in the GA races is directly responsible for MCConnell and the Republicans caving on sending out $600 stimulus checks. If they are approved, Ossoff and Warnock need to argue that, although better than nothing, the checks are not enough and Dems will provide more if they control the Senate

orlbucfan

And raise holy h3ll if that craporate liability sneaks back in.

wi63

The corporations arent to worried, their congresscritters cant wait to have Moscow Mitch “negotiate” with Byedone Jan 20th

Don midwest
Don midwest

My dad was a teacher. I was a TA for 4 years, taught one in Jr High to avoid the draft and a year at Clarion St. in PA and finally 5 years at Bucknell University in Computer Science with my degree in Math.

Education is vitally important but at all levels it seems to continue to go downhill.

Here is an entire article.

Bob Shepherd: How “Reform” Ruined Teaching

Diane Ravitch’s blog
Bob Shepherd: How “Reform” Ruined Teaching 3 days ago

Bob Shepherd returned to teaching after many years in the education publishing industry, where he developed curriculum and assessments. He writes about what changed while he was away. Thanks to State and federal mandates, he found himself ensnared by standards.

I taught at the beginning of my career, had a successful career in educational publishing, and then returned to teaching at the end of my career. What a difference these years made!!!!

At the beginning of my career, I had English Department Chairpeople who were highly experienced teachers. The general attitude of administrators was that English teachers were the experts on English, History teachers the experts on History and the teaching of History, etc., and they pretty much stayed out of stuff that wasn’t their business. We in the English Department would hold regular meetings and discuss what was and wasn’t working in our classes, choose curricula, share tips and lesson plans and materials (many of which we had developed), and set policies and procedures. Once a year, the English Department chairperson would do evaluations of the teachers in his or her department. We made our own tests. There was enormous opportunity for innovation because we could actually discuss with one another various pedagogical approaches and curricular materials and make our own decisions. Our discussions/debates about pedagogy and curricula were vigorous and spirited. Many of the teachers were older women who had been doing the job for years. They were, almost to a person, scholarly and highly knowledgeable. The kids learned a lot.

I loved teaching. The only reason I left was that the pay wasn’t great. I started a family, and the year I left, I almost tripled my salary.

Flash forward 25 years. When I returned to teaching, everything was micromanaged. We still had department meetings, but these had devolved into sessions in which the Department chairperson read to us the latest mandates from our administration or from the state. Curriculum materials were chosen for us and were HORRIBLE, test-preppy crap. We were expected to follow a day-by-day script from the state. Formal evaluations were done four times a year by APs or the Principal, using mandated checklists, and in addition, there were four other informal evaluations and a system of demerits for not completing an enormous list of requirements (if, for example, an AP came into one’s classroom and the standard, bellwork, essential question, daily vocabulary, and homework for the hour’s lesson weren’t posted on the board; if one’s Data Wall or lesson plan book (each class had to have a two-page lesson plan in a folder) were not completed and up to date; and so on (there were hundreds of such requirements–far too many for anyone to keep track of them). In short, the Department Chairperson and the teachers had lost all autonomy. We were expected to do enormous amounts of test prep because what mattered–to the evaluations of the students, of us, of the administrators, and the school–were the scores on the invalid, sloppy, ridiculous state tests. My pay depended upon the school’s state rating based upon those demonstrably invalid tests.

And the teachers had changed. They were mostly young. They were not scholarly and not knowledgeable. “What’s a gerund?” the 26-year-old English Department Chairperson asked me, looking at the month’s required grammar topics. “Oh, what’s that book?” a fellow English teacher asked me about a volume I was carrying. Never heard of this guy. YEETS?”

“Yeats,” I said. “His collected poems.”

“Oh, I don’t read poetry,” she said.

The Reading Coordinator informed us that our 9th graders had to read ALL of the Odyssey, in her words, “the ENTIRE NOVEL.” She freaking thought that The Odyssey was a novel!!! When we met to discuss a classical literature unit, she had no idea that the term referred to the literature of ancient Greece and Rome.

And there was enormous churn. Between a quarter and a third of the teaching staff every year.

To teach at all sanely, I had to pretend to be following the rules while secretly making my own curricular materials in the form of handouts.

I spent most of my time carrying out required tasks that were of ZERO value to my students, most of the related, in one way or another, to supposed “accountability.”

The profession had been utterly ruined in the name of “reform.”

polarbear4

shared. ty.

Don midwest
Don midwest

a socialist economist finds a new way to criticize capitalism

quoting Kafka in the punchline for the article

Kafka in his Diaries writes that there are two cardinal vices from which all others vices derive: impatience and laziness. But since laziness springs from impatience, he writes, there is really only one: impatience. Perhaps it is time to look at it

He says there is no objective way he knows of to prove his hunch in this article.

other countries done much better — listed

a few months before the outbreak of the pandemic, Western countries, like USA were listed as the best prepared

why have we done so much worse than Asian countries?

been many attempts to explain it

I would like to propose another deeper cause of the debacle. It is a soft cause. It is a speculation. It cannot be proven empirically. It has never been measured and perhaps it is impossible to measure with any degree of exactness. That explanation is impatience.

When one looks at Western countries’ reaction to the pandemic, one is struck by its stop-and-go character. Lockdown measures were imposed, often reluctantly, in the Spring when the epidemic seemed to be at the peak, just to be released as soon as there was an improvement. The improvement was perceived by the public as the end of the epidemic. The governments were happy to participate in that self-deception. Then, in the Fall, the epidemic came back with vengeance, and again the tough measures were imposed half-heartedly, under pressure, and with the (already once-chastened) hope that they could be rescinded for the holidays.

Why did not governments and the public go from the beginning for strong measures whose objective would not have been merely to “flatten the curve” but to either eradicate the virus or drive it out to such an extent, as it was done in East Asia, so that only sporadic bursts might remain? Those flare ups could be dealt again using drastic measures as in June when Beijing closed its largest open market, supplying several million people, after a few cases of covid were linked to it.

The public, and thus I think, the governments were unwilling to take the East Asian approach to the pandemic because of a culture of impatience, of desire to quickly solve all problems, to bear only very limited costs. That delusion however did not work with covid.

this is most of the article

do you agree that he found a new way to go after neo liberalism?

his major research area is income inequality and unions

https://www.globalpolicyjournal.com/blog/15/12/2020/impatience-deep-cause-western-failure-handling-pandemic

polarbear4

i can see how the consumerism that we are propagandized into from birth plays a big part in impatience, AND if the government had truly supported people and businesses there would have been a lot less of it.

made me think, tho, about how impatience goes with perfectionism and monkey mind and how we are also trained to value our monkey mind, our critical mind, at the expense of that space where we don’t need to grasp or demand or move. not as a permanent destination, but as a place to refuel and venture out again from.

as much as meditation “sells” right now, there is still an undercurrent of how it is airy fairy and selfish and maybe you can use it to accomplish great things in the corporate world. we are not encouraged to be ok with being still, perhaps bc we might find out how much junk we don’t need.

phatkhat
phatkhat

I think as well that Asians tend to have a more “collective” culture, where the individual is not as important as the society, and, therefore, people are more willing to give up their personal interests – at least temporarily – for the good of the society. We are brought up on individualism, which is good to a point, but we also stretch that into life being a zero sum game, which makes us insensitive to the plight of others. We tend to blame people for their own problems, when it is really the culture that spawned them.

wi63

I was taught at a young age as i played sports that the team was above the individual. On some teams i was what they call a stud now a days , on other teams i was average. the lesson learned was that WE had to pull together and sacrifice to accomplish the goal at hand. I’ve carried that concept with me my whole life and at work being in Management.

polarbear4

i’d wager you are a really good super.

phatkhat
phatkhat

Yes, me, too. When I was cadre in a leadership school in the Army, there were two cadre to each squad of students. My colleague and I always told our squad that we didn’t want to see any prima donna – they were a team. No stars, a team.

Later, in civilian management, my leadership style wasn’t appreciated so much. I tend to do participatory management, and MY bosses wanted me to be authoritarian. Corporate BS.

polarbear4

Benny, did you forget your TIP JAR? If I missed it, we’re tipping double today cuz you deserve it. :O)

phatkhat
phatkhat

Hey, Benny! I missed your Pootie post yesterday…

I’m late, but … Nicky.

I’ve had two wonderful orange toms named Nicky, both of whom have crossed the bridge. Nicky-Nu was shot by a hateful neighbor back in 2000, and he looked sooooo much like this guy. I adopted an elderly guy off death row at the shelter in 2012 who looked like Nicky-Nu, and named him Nicky-Paws. He passed on New Year’s two years ago. He was a sweetheart.

Whatever you name him, he’s gorgeous!

polarbear4

goes well with Nico.:O)

Nico also reminds of Lou Reed

polarbear4

i think i like this version better

it’s that guitar rush, like “heroin.”

jcitybone

phatkhat
phatkhat

AOC has quickly become a very accomplished politician. Out of the squad, I think Rashida is the one who remains the most “real”. I am looking forward to Cori Bush and Jamaal Bowman arriving on the scene.

Omar is good, but she sometimes is not in control of her mouth or her Twitter fingers. I never really thought much of Pressley. But, they are still better than the majority of the Dims. I think Katie Porter and Jayapal are rising stars, and both of them are better than AOC, who mostly owes where she is to Bernie.

orlbucfan

Jayapal is one shrewd cookie. The only reason she can’t run for Speaker is she wasn’t born here. I’ve watched her ever since she was elected. I love Rashida cos she is a bulldog who fights for her district, and we political nuts across the country know it. AOC is the lightning rod for the FRighties. I hope she survives for her district’s sake. Katie Porter is much more liberal/progressive than Pressley. I so hope our firebrand Ms. Nina can join this posse. 🙂 Our joke of a rep down here is Stephanie Murphy, just another dimwitted DINO. 🙁

jcitybone

I like both Porter and Pressley, but note that recently Porter voted for the defense budget while Pressley voted against. That’s a big deal to me.

orlbucfan

Interesting as the two of them are pure moderates. Probably had to support the MICC cos it’s the big job creator(🤮🤮💩) in their districts.

phatkhat
phatkhat

Sometimes that is a YUGE factor in keeping the electorate happy. Even Bernie has voted a few times for stuff his voters wanted, whether or not he did, himself. If they don’t vote for their constituents, then we complain they aren’t thinking about US. Between the proverbial rock and hard place.

jcitybone

When divorce is definitely a good thing

https://www.commondreams.org/news/2020/12/15/42-billion-direct-giving-mackenzie-scott-formerly-bezos-puts-shame-billionaire-class

While progressives often argue that billionaires shouldn’t exist, as long as about 650 still do in the United States, they could all learn from MacKenzie Scott, the ex-wife of Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos, who on Tuesday prompted widespread praise for announcing nearly $4.2 billion in gifts to 384 organizations.

Scott ranks 18th on the Bloomberg Billionaires Index—which her ex-husband leads by a sizable margin—thanks to a 2019 divorce settlement in which she gained millions of Amazon shares. She has pledged to give away most of her wealth and in July announced $1.67 billion in direct grants to 116 charities addressing racial injustice and other aspects of inequality.

Her second major giving announcement, which came in a Medium post, acknowledges that the ongoing coronavirus pandemic “has been a wrecking ball in the lives of Americans already struggling. Economic losses and health outcomes alike have been worse for women, for people of color, and for people living in poverty. Meanwhile, it has substantially increased the wealth of billionaires.”

According to the Institute for Policy Studies (IPS), the collective wealth of the nation’s billionaires has soared by $1 trillion since March, while the pandemic has raged on, killing over 302,000 people nationwide as millions struggle to stay fed and afford rent or mortgage payments in the absence of adequate federal relief.

“Scott’s bold and direct giving puts shame to the billionaire class and their perpetual private foundations,” Chuck Collins, director of the Program on Inequality and the Common Good at IPS, wrote Tuesday for Common Dreams. He noted that “the bulk of these gifts are to the works of mercy during this pandemic—food banks, direct social service organizations, emergency funds, and support services for the most vulnerable.”

“Many private foundations are still guarding their perpetual endowments and giving the minimum 5% required, including overhead,” Collins explained. “By example, Scott is shaming these mega-foundations that worry more about perpetuity than the suffering of their neighbors during an unprecedented crisis.”

orlbucfan

Okay, let’s start doing the math. This woman is worth a ridiculous fortune even divorced from Bezos. So, what is so great about her? How many billions did she settle with him on the divorce? More than 1B, you can count on. I am NOT impressed. How about she starts getting behind such changes as in going back to progressive income taxation. She backs it with her dough as well as her mouth and tweets. Ya think?

jcitybone

Yes that’s true. But looking at it another way, that’s almost $6 billion that wouldn’t have been donated if it stayed under Bezos’s control. So the divorce was a good thing.

phatkhat
phatkhat

If you look into how Amazon started, she was the brains and motivation for little Jeffy. She DESERVED what she got in the settlement, especially since it was him that decided he needed a newer model. (The new model, IMO, looks like a midnite streetwalker.) Rich men seem to be like that.

I think it’s great that she is using her money to help people who need help NOW, and not when the govt. gets around to it. Perhaps she will back some progressive goals down the road, but kudos to her for feeding the hungry and keeping the lights on for many.

Aint Supposed to Die A Natural Death
Aint Supposed to Die A Natural Death

I recall that she got 30 something billion when they divorced. Now she’s worth 50 something billion. I praise her for her charitable gifts but I’d like to BAN BILLIONAIRES. Bring their money in from off shore and pay their damn taxes.

phatkhat
phatkhat

True. BUT. OTOH. She is directly benefiting people who need help now. Giving to groups that are helping people with immediate needs like food and utilities. What is the effing government doing???? Allotting big billions to the Pentagon, but resisting a stimulus after people have been hurting for months, and even wanting to give liability protection to the big corps who hurt them. The pandemic is worse than ever, but they don’t want to help the little folks. $600. Maybe. This is sick.

Supposedly MacKenzie plans to give away most of her fortune, which may take awhile, since it multiplies fast when you have that much. It may well be that she actually ends up doing more for people this way than if she were paying it in taxes – which would be channeled to breaks for Wall St., etc.

polarbear4

i’d be more impressed if she used it to help change the system so that we are self-sufficient–our govt. our money and not left to syncophantic praise of billionaire largess.

but yeah, it’s something and since we are powerless to change things at the moment, it’s very meaningful to those who benefit. grates on me, though.

LieparDestin

orlbucfan

T and R, Ms. Benny!!🎄☮️😊👍 If the Nest needs backup help in opening, let me know. 😊✊