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jcitybone

If Fetterman can win that PA Senate seat, he will definitely be a progressive national force down the road.

https://thehill.com/homenews/senate/537767-pennsylvania-lieutenant-governor-announces-senate-bid

Pennsylvania Lt. Gov. John Fetterman (D) formally announced Monday that he will seek the state’s open U.S. Senate seat in 2022.

Fetterman filed to run in what is expected to be one of the nation’s most competitive races last week, but was cagey on whether it constituted a formal announcement. The lieutenant governor raised over $1 million after opening a campaign account in January.

“Talk is cheap, but for the past 20 years, I have been working to represent, rebuild, and to advance these places,” Fetterman, formerly the mayor of Braddock, Pennsylvania said in a video announcing his run Monday.

“It’s not rural versus urban, it’s rural and urban. I’m going to fight not for one part of Pennsylvania, not for one party of Pennsylvania, but for one Pennsylvania. Just the way I did as mayor, just the way I’m doing as lieutenant governor, and just the way I would as your next U.S. senator,” he added.

jcitybone

humphrey

I am sure that the DSCC 💩 will find some moderate to get behind to prevent him being successful.

wi63

The people in Pa seem to like this guy which is a plus, Hell move to Wi and Kick Johnsons ass figuratively and politically 🙂

jcitybone
jcitybone

https://www.commondreams.org/news/2021/02/08/not-radical-idea-budget-chair-sanders-says-room-full-lawyers-working-ensure-15-wage

Last week, as Common Dreams reported, Sanders pointed to a new research paper by University of California, Berkeley economist Michael Reich showing that raising the national minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2025 would have a positive federal budget impact of $65.4 billion a year. According to Reich, the budget boost would come from a combination of increased tax revenue and reduced federal spending on some social programs that many low-wage workers are forced to rely on to make ends meet.

A recent study by Ben Zipperer and David Cooper of the Economic Policy Institute echoes Reich’s findings. “One requirement that often rules provisions out of the budget reconciliation process is that these provisions must have fiscal impacts that are not just ‘extraneous,'” the economists note. “This report shows clearly that the fiscal effects of a significant increase in the minimum wage are direct and economically significant.”

“I’m proud to be one of the (virtual) ‘room full of lawyers’ working with Bernie Sanders to get the minimum wage hike [through reconciliation],” tweeted Bill Dauster, chief counsel of the Senate Budget Committee.

In an op-ed for Roll Call last month, Dauster pointed out that the Constitution gives the vice president or the Senate’s president pro tempore—currently Kamala Harris and Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), respectively—the power to overrule the parliamentarian should the official decide that a minimum wage hike is out of bounds.

“As raising the minimum wage is budgetary, the parliamentarian should allow it to be included in reconciliation,” Dauster argued. “If the Senate parliamentarian does not advise them that Congress can include the minimum wage in budget reconciliation, Harris or Leahy should exercise their constitutional authority to say that it can.”

jcitybone

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-usa-evictions-insi/this-is-not-justice-tenant-activists-upend-u-s-eviction-courts-idUSKBN2A8112?utm_source=reddit.com

As freezing temperatures settled over Kansas City, Missouri, on Jan. 28, Judge Jack Grate opened his online courtroom. The first of 100 cases on his docket was that of Tonya Raynor, a 64-year-old who owed $2,790 in back rent and fees on an apartment on the city’s east side, a swath of vacant storefronts and boarded-up properties.

Members of KC Tenants, an anti-eviction group, maintain a blockade at the Eastern Jackson County Courthouse in Independence, Missouri, U.S. January 5, 2021. Carly Rosin/Handout via REUTERS
“Miss Raynor, are you there?” asked Grate, a burly 71-year-old sporting a beard, a buzz cut and a rumpled, orange short-sleeve shirt.

A booming voice responded: “This is not justice. This is violence.” Soon a chorus joined in: “Judge Grate, you are making people homeless! You are killing people!”

The voices in the virtual courtroom of the Jackson County Circuit Court belonged to members of KC Tenants, a group that brought Kansas City’s eviction operation to its knees last month. The group is one of scores of tenants’ unions and anti-eviction activist groups in cities nationwide whose memberships have exploded during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Housing experts liken their combative tactics to the rent strikes that swept the United States during the Great Depression.

Some of these activists operate loosely under the umbrella of the Autonomous Tenants Union, which works to end evictions nationally. Others, like KC tenants, are independent. Their anthems are “Cancel Rent,” “No Debt,” and “No Evictions.”

Torabs
Torabs

Nice to see zoom hijacked by people fighting for a cause, instead of the usual racists and scumbags.

jcitybone

Torabs
Torabs

Another brick in the wall, for the case to disregard the Supreme Court as an illegitimate institution. You allow a criminal to appoint justices, you get rulings that discard the rule of law.

jcitybone

polarbear4

and bloomberg is our envoy? smh

humphrey

Good interview.

Sunrise Co-founder: How To Judge Biden’s Commitment On Climate

jcitybone

polarbear4

my son earns a LOT and he was never out of work.

jcitybone

polarbear4

shocking. m4a, please and thank you.