HomeUncategorizedNews Roundup & Open Thread – Bernie’s Yemen War Resolution, O’Rourke Enters 2020 Race, Dems Seek Ilhan Omar Primary Challenger & More
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la58

https://www.commondreams.org/views/2019/03/13/its-not-socialism-its-what-people-

Far from socialism, this is democratic populism, reversing decades of government policies that take from the many to give to the wealthy few. It’s an honest, popular rebellion against the corporate plutocracy that seeks to usurp America’s democracy, promoted by Trump and Cornyn. Which side are you on?

And which side are some of our Democratic leaders on? Unfortunately, an exotic flu epidemic has broken out in Washington, D.C. Dubbed the “Canadian hot sauce flu,” it afflicts a particular group of Democratic officeholders and operatives.

Its name stems from the fact that CHS flu renders its victims weaker than Canadian hot sauce, leaving them unable to stand boldly for the workaday majority they’re supposed to represent. Instead, the afflicted — mostly old-line party leaders — are reduced to meek incrementalism, don’t-rock-the-boat corporatism and conservative appeasement when advancing policy ideas. They fear that anything stronger than a policy stew of watered-down leftovers will spook centrist and conservative voters

From Jim Hightower

polarbear4

They’re afraid it will spook their donors. If they didn’t before, they can see now how bringing this message in plain language to their constituents results in their constituents wanting Bernie’s platform.

magsview

Yes, better to just not go there with that kind of talk! nudge, nudge, wink, wink, know what I mean?

magsview

Hey! Don’t bring Canada into this. 😉

ChillyChiles.com

CC.jpg
Leu2500
Leu2500

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/03/11/bernie-sanders-interviewing-possible-2020-staff-in-south-carolina.html

“Bernie Sanders is interviewing possible 2020 staff in South Carolina, where he lost badly in 2016”

Ah, yes. Have to get a dig in. Laugh’s on them, as Hillary lost SC in 2008 & then won it in 2016. So “past performance in not a predictor of future performance.”

And a reminder that Bernie has an event in SC today.

Benny

This afternoon I’m likely to start a thread on Beto’s candidacy. I think we should talk about the pros and cons of it, but hopefully in a constructive way.

Tonight is Bernie’s rally and hopefully we can get something going for that too.

jcitybone

Rice and O’Rourke were both New Dems. She was one of the leaders of the moderate Dem push to deny Pelosi the speaker gavel. Pelosi took revenge on her by denying her the committee assignment she asked for

magsview

Will this help?

Beto O’Rourke Is the Candidate For Vapid Morons

I have no special foresight, but it doesn’t take a crystal ball to see that an O’Rourke presidency would be a sad retread at a time when we can’t afford to lose a day, much less four years. The future, if it includes Beto in the oval office, will follow the same path, and the path is grim.

And anyone on the nominal left who believes otherwise—this is too important to mince words—is an idiot.

(Sorry LD! He would probably have been better than Cruz though, and I was rooting for him then. It’s a good piece, btw, compares Beto to Obama.)

Then there’s this:

Beto O’Rourke is running for president. Like Obama, he has sought the middle ground on policy

“I’m a capitalist. I don’t see how we’re able to meet any of the fundamental challenges that we have as a country without, in part, harnessing the power of the market,” O’Rourke told reporters recently in El Paso.

“Climate change is the most immediate example of that. If you’re going to bring the total innovation and ingenuity of this country to bear, our system as a country, our economy, is going to have to be part of that,” he said.

O’Rourke’s comments represented a break with the Democratic Party’s left wing, which supports the idea of radically restructuring how markets work, especially energy markets.

More importantly, in terms of the primary, it signaled that O’Rourke intends to fashion himself as a sort of anti-Sanders – a champion for capitalism

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/03/14/beto-orourke-is-running-for-president-echoes-obama-seeking-middle-ground.html

jcitybone

https://wsbt.com/news/local/buttigieg-says-he-is-very-close-to-meeting-requirements-for-first-dnc-debate-this-year

South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg says he is very close to meeting the requirements for the first DNC debate this year.

Buttigieg is required to at least get 1-percent support in three qualifying polls or have at least 65,000 donors. Of those donors at least 200 need to be from at least 20 states.

Mayor Buttigieg says he is 85-percent of the way there.

Tyrannocaster
Tyrannocaster

I hope he makes it. And Tulsi, too.

orlbucfan

Me, too. 🙂

jcitybone

https://www.commondreams.org/views/2019/03/13/bring-back-eisenhower-socialism

What would today’s hysterical Republicans say about the “socialist” presidency of Dwight Eisenhower? Most likely they would call him “Red Ike.” After all, during Eisenhower’s two terms between 1953 and 1960, the wealthy paid a top tax rate of 91 percent on incomes over the equivalent of $1.7 million for an individual and $3.4 million for a couple.

That crafty pinko Eisenhower also presided over government-subsidized mortgages that helped millions of Americans purchase their first home and attend college for free. He presided over the construction of public housing and state-owned infrastructure (like highways).

In the early 1960s, the specter of socialism stalked the land again, this time in the form of a proposal to create a national health insurance program to cover senior citizens. Conservatives mounted a full-throated resistance movement to what George H.W. Bush at the time called “socialized medicine.”

The rest of us know it as Medicare.

polarbear4

Beautiful shot. Wish it was the whole planet, though.

polarbear4

polarbear4

We have to stop this. How many countries does this make, say, in the last 10 years.

polarbear4

Yay. Something concrete.

polarbear4

polarbear4

WindDancer13

That is one scary article…but not unexpected.

Benny

I’ll be postponing the Beto diary until tomorrow. I’m doing some research on a theme that’s taken longer than I expected. I will post an livestream/evening thread for Bernie’s event in SC in a few hours.

humphrey

It would be nice if this became a trend though it unlikely with this administration.

humphrey

humphrey

humphrey

humphrey

Benny

There’s a poll at TOP that is accompanying a diary advocating for Beto’s candidacy.

Take a look at the poll results.

humphrey

The results are not what they wanted to see. LOL

wi60

Bernie at 83% kos must be having a fit about that

WindDancer13

Tulsi not on the list, but two people I have never heard of are.

jcitybone

Thanks Chris Hedges for your kind words about Bernie 😡

https://www.salon.com/2019/03/14/chris-hedges-on-the-failure-of-the-democrats-and-the-rise-of-the-trump-cult/

First of all, it is really early. We don’t really have politics in America; we have reality TV. How many candidates are there, 16 or something? Sanders thinks he can win because he did Chuck Schumer’s bidding and went around the country telling people to vote for Hillary Clinton. Sanders built a relationship with the Democratic Party and this time around he thinks the party elites won’t steal the nomination from him, which they did last time.

I think that Bernie is mistaken. I think he’s very naive. There’s no way the Democratic Party will allow him to be the nominee because the Democratic Party is funded by the same retrograde corporate interests that fund the Republican Party.

He’s a white liberal. White liberals feel uncomfortable around people of color, especially black people. I would also guess that Bernie probably doesn’t have very many close relationships, if any, with African-Americans who didn’t go to Harvard Law School. I just think he’s completely tone-deaf. I think we saw that early on in his campaign.

Reparations, I would argue, are at their core not really about money. Reparations are about a country coming to terms with and owning its past. I’m talking about the white majority. James Baldwin writes about this. We feed off of a mythology of whiteness and white supremacy, a mythology that is completely mendacious and entails vast historical distortion and historical amnesia. That is very dangerous for any country.

The act of paying reparations is not just about the justice that is owed to African-Americans. Maybe more important, it’s about the ability of the United States and its white majority to face who they are, where they came from and what they did. That inability to face that, as Baldwin points out, has allowed them to confuse willful ignorance with innocence, and turn them into monsters. The face of that is Donald Trump.

I look at Bernie and I see the classic white liberal. I live in Princeton, they’re all around, but they don’t have real relationships with people of color. They might employ them in their homes or do their lawns or they might have a black colleague who has a Ph.D. from Yale. That’s why they were so happy with Barack Obama.

Benny

Someone posted it either at C99 or TOP. I remember I wasn’t very keen about the piece.

polarbear4

Ummm Did Nina go to Harvard? Maybe so. I also think Chris Hedges makes a lot of assumptions about people that he doesn’t know very well.

Really burns me. Squashing the baby named hope.

Same old hit piece, Chris. Thanks for keeping us in the middle ages, jerk

I hope this article dies an early death.

WindDancer13

Noam Chomsky likes Bernie. There are an awful lot of assumptions in this piece. Has Hedges ever sat down and gotten to know Bernie?

Doh. Why do you think Bernie asked for a definition at the Town Hall? What the path is to making life equitable depends a lot on how you define the issues, the needs and the outcomes. (PS: Many people misunderstood Bernie’s response.)

Reparations, I would argue, are at their core not really about money.

jcitybone

CNN hit piece

https://www.cnn.com/2019/03/14/politics/kfile-bernie-nationalization/index.html

Bernie Sanders advocated for the nationalization of most major industries, including energy companies, factories, and banks, when he was a leading member of a self-described “radical political party” in the 1970s, a CNN KFile review of his record reveals.

Sanders’ past views shed light on a formative period of his political career that could become relevant as he advances in the 2020 Democratic primary.

Many of the positions he held at the time are more extreme compared to the more tempered democratic socialism the Vermont senator espouses today and could provide fodder for moderate Democrats and Republicans looking to cast the Democratic presidential candidate and his beliefs as a fringe form of socialism that would be harmful to the country.

In a statement to CNN, Sanders campaign spokesman Josh Orton said, “Throughout his career, Bernie has fought on the side of working people and against the influence of both the powerful ultra-rich and giant corporations who seek only to further their own greed. The record shows that from the very beginning, Bernie anticipated and worked to combat the rise of a billionaire ruling class and the exploding power of Wall Street and multinational corporations. Whether fighting to lower energy prices or expand access to capital for local development, Bernie’s first priority has always been — and will always be — defending the interests of working people across the country.”

humphrey

Too bad that the things that he advocated for in the 70’s weren’t adopted. Things would be so much better today.😁

OzoneTom
OzoneTom

Crazy talk! Maybe the MIC wouldn’t have gotten ownership of the entire government and turned the middle-east into the hell-hole that it is today.

WindDancer13

CNN had better be careful. They might give young people today some new ideas about what to advocate for. Ideas like just what would be so bad about nationalizing the energy companies. Consider it part of the GND. = ) I think many are already looking at public banks.

humphrey

humphrey

jcitybone

I think Bernie’s brand can sell a few t shirts. Three New Dem supporters so far.

https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2019/03/beto-wants-be-like-obama-announced-more-like-trump/584965/

O’Rourke announced Thursday morning via a video shot from his couch, his hand gesturing up and down to punctuate his script, his wife sitting beside him, half smiling but not speaking for three and a half minutes.

There were no specifics on how he’d do anything he wants to do, or even exactly what that might be, in his announcement, other than a long pledge to uplift people and bring the country together, instead of tearing it part, as Trump has. Nor were there specifics in his first event in Iowa later in the morning, carried live on cable—he talked about health care but didn’t mention Medicare for All or any other alternative. He was asked about the Green New Deal but talked generally about climate as he addressed “the spirit of the question.” There are T-shirts and hats for sale online, with just his first name. It’s not up on hotels or towers anywhere, but there’s no other Democrat running famous enough to be quite such a brand.

“In 12 hours, he has already bragged about being ‘born’ for this, made his wife sit quietly next to him, and talked about how he ‘sometimes’ helps raising his children,” said an aide to one of the other Democratic candidates. “If his goal was to soften the blow of white man’s privilege, he has failed spectacularly.”

O’Rourke, however, did score three immediate endorsements from his former colleagues in the House, all women: Kathleen Rice of New York, Stephanie Murphy of Florida and Victoria Escobar of Texas.

There are Obama alumni who have gotten increasingly frustrated with the comparisons to O’Rourke, and to Obama’s own flirtations him. They point out that while Obama might have been searching for himself in high school and in college, he graduated Columbia and moved to the South Side of Chicago to be a community organizer in a tough neighborhood, while O’Rourke graduated Columbia and nannied for a family living in one of the fanciest buildings on the Upper West Side.

humphrey

jcitybone

Duplicate

jcitybone

Beto, Biden, and the Electability Trap

O’Rourke, who just announced, will have some stiff competition for the coveted “most electable Democrat” title — namely, Joe Biden, based on the unsubtle hints the former vice president dropped on Tuesday about an eminent announcement. While O’Rourke casts himself in the Obama 2008 mold, the charming young unicorn who can heal the nation’s political and cultural divides, Biden represents an old-school idea of electability — the kind of Democrat who calls Vice President Mike Pence a “decent guy,” lauds his longtime relationships in Washington with conservative Republicans and gets red-faced when lefties call him on it. “Mean pettiness has overtaken our politics,” Biden said on Tuesday, after he’d been forced to backtrack on his praise for Pence. “If you notice, I get criticized for saying anything nice about a Republican. Folks, that’s not who we are.”

In their different ways, Biden and Beto promise a return to bipartisanship — a notion that even New York columnist Jonathan Chait, himself no raging lefty, calls “harebrained” and “fantastical.” But there is a powerful pull to the idea of electability that comes with such airy talk of bringing people together to “get stuff done,” as Beto likes to say. And that’s especially true for 2020, when Democrats are understandably desperate to dethrone Donald Trump. Earlier this year, a Monmouth poll found that 56 percent of likely Democratic voters said they prized electability over all else — and would vote for a candidate who disagreed with them “on most issues” if she or he seemed best-suited to oust Trump. That stunned even the pollsters. “In prior elections, voters from both parties consistently prioritized shared values over electability when selecting a nominee,” said poll director Patrick Murray. “It looks like Democrats may be willing to flip that equation in 2020.”

If that were actually a formula for winning elections, it might make sense that Democrats obsess like crazy over identifying the “most electable” choice for 2020. But the opposite is true: When parties tap the candidates who engage and enthuse them the most, both in terms of style and substance, they elect presidents. When they pay heed to the nattering nabobs of electability, and go with perceptions of “who’s most likely to win,” they lose.

It’s conceivable, of course, that 2020 could prove an exception to the rule of recent history; nobody breaks precedents quite like Trump. Maybe someone with Beto or Cory Booker’s ideological fuzziness, Biden or John Hickenlooper’s Lite Republicanism, or Amy Klobuchar’s Midwestern moderation could break the historical pattern and prevail. But Democrats, in their determination to snuff out Trump, would be wise to bear in mind that the safest choices tend to make the lamest nominees.

WindDancer13

There are plenty of Republicans that Joe “Anita Hill” Biden can say nice things about and not get called out for it. Pence just isn’t one of them.

humphrey

humphrey

wi60

Don’t trust anyone over 40 unless its Bernie 🙂

humphrey

polarbear4

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