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jcitybone

https://www.newyorker.com/news/campaign-chronicles/bernie-sanders-at-the-end-of-the-world

The Internet will now ring out with think pieces attempting to explain either why Sanders made it as far as he did or why he failed to close the deal. Maybe if he had been more aggressive, or more conciliatory, or more concise, or more voluminous, he could have turned things around. Maybe, if he had reiterated once more what he meant by democratic socialism, he could have won over the skeptics who heard his desire for a Scandinavian-style safety net as code for executions in Central Park. Maybe if he had given a sweeping speech about race—as Barack Obama did in 2008, and as Cornel West and others reportedly advised Sanders not to do in 2020—he could have won a larger share of the African-American vote. Sanders and his core supporters will forever blame “the establishment” for his loss; Sanders’s critics will counter that the voters simply considered Biden more electable, a result that they will ascribe not to collusion but to democracy. If the coronavirus pandemic had descended sooner, maybe it would have redounded to Sanders’s benefit; or maybe the moment would have seemed ripe for a candidate who had a plan for that, or a candidate running on a universal basic income. The truth, although it doesn’t make for a tidy think piece, is that all of these hypothetical claims have some merit. We tend to overlearn the lessons of each election, pretending that the outcome reveals some essential truth about our national character. But the 2016 election doesn’t make all women unelectable, and this year’s Democratic primary doesn’t obviate the popularity of universal health care. George McGovern’s loss in 1972 doesn’t prove that a leftist can’t win any more than Al Gore’s loss in 2000 proves that a moderate can’t win. If Sanders’s luck had held through Super Tuesday, this would not have meant that the Democratic Party was irredeemably in the thrall of socialism; the fact that a plurality of the base has settled for Biden, for now, does not mean that the Democrats are fundamentally and forever the party of throwback centrism. “I ran for the Presidency because I believed that, as the President, I could accelerate and institutionalize the progressive changes that we are all building together,” Sanders said on Wednesday, formally announcing the end of his campaign from his house in Burlington, Vermont. “While the path may be slower now, we will change this nation.” Then, presumably, he turned off the camera, set the table, and told the old story of an unprepossessing prophet who didn’t quite make it to the promised land.

Benny

If Sanders’s luck had held through Super Tuesday, this would not have meant that the Democratic Party was irredeemably in the thrall of socialism; the fact that a plurality of the base has settled for Biden, for now, does not mean that the Democrats are fundamentally and forever the party of throwback centrism. “

No, we are definitely in the throes of fascism, and unfortunately, DNC is a willing authoritarian partner in this, despite all of the bull lip service. I call it bull because most members of congress and this president have large investments in the stock market, and they are their lord protectors. They haven’t pinned down King John.

Spring Texan
Spring Texan

If Sanders’ “luck” held through Super-Tuesday, they’d have found some other way to screw him and us. There was never a path to victory as they are ruthless and powerful. Wall Street rules.

Torabs
Torabs

Yes, the Internet will ring because, as humans, we’ll want to ascribe some meaning or glean some understanding from this painful moment. Now say something useful, dammit! 😉

jcitybone

Aint Supposed to Die A Natural Death
Aint Supposed to Die A Natural Death

Sorry. I can’t.

Torabs
Torabs

Love you Ilhan, but I cannot subscribe to the magic wand theory of electoral politics. Demand more, especially of our erstwhile allies in the phony anti-fascist alliance.

orlbucfan

T and R, LD!! Sent you an email. 🙂

jcitybone

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/09/opinion/wisconsin-primary-democracy.html

What we saw in Wisconsin, in short, was a state party doing whatever it takes to cling to power even if a majority of voters want it out — and a partisan bloc on the Supreme Court backing its efforts. Donald Trump, as usual, said the quiet part out loud: If we expand early voting and voting by mail, “you’d never have a Republican elected in this country again.”

Does anyone seriously doubt that something similar could happen, very soon, at a national level?

This November, it’s all too possible that Trump will eke out an Electoral College win thanks to widespread voter suppression. If he does — or even if he wins cleanly — everything we’ve seen suggests that he will use a second term to punish everyone he sees as a domestic enemy, and that his party will back him all the way. That is, America will do a full Hungary.

What if Trump loses? You know what he’ll do: He’ll claim that Joe Biden’s victory was based on voter fraud, that millions of illegal immigrants cast ballots or something like that. Would the Republican Party, and perhaps more important, Fox News, support his refusal to accept reality? What do you think?

So that’s why what just happened in Wisconsin scares me more than either disease or depression. For it shows that one of our two major parties simply doesn’t believe in democracy. Authoritarian rule may be just around the corner.

orlbucfan

Somehow I want to spit on this NYT writer. You all know the reasons why. What a hypocritical rag.

Spring Texan
Spring Texan

Both parties don’t believe in democracy. At all. It’s a farce.

jcitybone

https://www.commondreams.org/views/2020/04/10/election-travesty-wisconsin-wake-call-nation

To conduct the Wisconsin Experiment in real time on the global stage is the most brazen attack on democracy in our lifetimes since African Americans and Freedom Riders risked lynching and murder for voting rights in the 1950s and ‘60s. This vote was forced knowing full well that Milwaukee County is 26 percent black yet accounted for 73 percent of coronavirus deaths as of early April. African Americans make up only 7 percent of Wisconsin’s population, but accounted for 40 percent of coronavirus deaths.

The inescapable calculus was that the tragic presence of the coronavirus in Milwaukee would make many voters stay home, an open attempt at voter suppression. If but one person ends up dying from COVID-19 from standing in line for two and three hours to vote, the responsibility lies squarely with Republicans in 2020 as sure as it did with the Ku Klux Klan 60 years ago.

We should have learned from the civil rights movement that no American should ever again have to risk their lives to vote. The Wisconsin Experiment, aided by a conservative state supreme court that refused to stop the election and the conservative US Supreme Court that refused to extend absentee voting, shows us how far these forces will go to deny both history and science.

Given that some level of social restrictions of the coronavirus crisis will likely be with us for months to come, Wisconsin must be seen as a wake-up call for the November election. It shows we need a doubling and tripling of our efforts to assure free and fair elections, with online registration, mail-in voting options, and safe in-person voting procedures across the country.

That is a tall order in the face of a conservative machinery long dedicated to rolling back voting rights as the demographics of the nation move toward people of color representing a majority of the populace. But we have no choice but to face the challenge.

jcitybone

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/apr/10/new-york-coronavirus-inequality-divide-two-cities

As the crisis thickens, a picture of how the virus is ravaging the city has come into view carrying with it a sobering realization. Coronavirus may not in itself discriminate, but its outcomes certainly do. It has inflicted its terrible toll not so much on New York City, but on the two cities it contains.

“Coronavirus has exposed New York’s two societies,” Jumaane Williams, the public advocate who acts as the official watchdog for New Yorkers, told the Guardian. “One society was able to run away to the Hamptons or work from home and have food delivered to their door; the other society was deemed ‘essential workers’ and made to go out to work with no protection.”

Different boroughs, even different neighborhoods within each borough, are experiencing coronavirus almost as though it were two different contagions. In wealthier white areas the residential streets are empty; parking spots that are fought over in normal times now stand vacant following an exodus to out-of-town weekend homes or Airbnbs.

In places like the Bronx – which is 84% black, Latino or mixed race – the sidewalks are still bustling with people making their way into work. There is still a rush hour. “We used to call them ‘service workers’,” Williams said. “Now they are ‘essential workers’ and we have left them to fend for themselves.”

The public advocate pointed out that 79% of New York’s frontline workers – nurses, subway staff, sanitation workers, van drivers, grocery cashiers – are African American or Latino. While those city dwellers who have the luxury to do so are in lockdown in their homes, these communities have no choice but to put themselves in harm’s way every day.

If you superimpose a map of where frontline workers live within New York over a map of the 76,876 confirmed cases in the city, the two are virtually identical. In Queens, the most intense concentration of Covid-19 infections are in precisely those neighborhoods with large numbers of essential workers.

One telling detail: at least 41 subway and bus workers have died from coronavirus. A diversity review by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) in 2016 found that 55% of its 72,000 employees were black or Latino, and 82% were male – which is also telling as more men than women are dying from the virus.

jcitybone

Burying bodies on Hart Island, in the Bronx, on Thursday.

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jcitybone

https://abcnews.go.com/Health/nyc-stark-contrast-covid-19-infection-rates-based/story?id=69920706

As COVID-19 cases and deaths continue to mount in New York City, the epicenter of the United States’ outbreak, researchers are uncovering clues about which neighborhoods have been hardest hit by the disease — and which characteristics of those neighborhoods put residents at risk.

New analysis by researchers at New York University’s Furman Center, which studies housing, neighborhoods and urban policy, found that strongest neighborhood factors linked to high COVID-19 rates were having a large share of black and Hispanic residents; having a high proportion of overcrowded apartments and having a large share of residents without college degrees.

Staying at home is one of the strongest ways that public health officials have been attempting to get a handle on COVID-19, which has no cure or vaccine and appears to have a higher fatality and infection rate than the seasonal flu. Sheltering in place is easier for some than others, experts say.

In addition to being less likely to work from home, residents without degrees are more likely to rely on public transportation during the pandemic, creating an added exposure risk for them.

In New York neighborhoods with the highest COVID-19 infection rates, an average of 28.7% of residents had college degrees compared to 47.3% of residents in neighborhoods with the lowest infection rates, the analysis, which examined publicly available information, found.

polarbear4

“appears to have a higher fatality and infection rate” pretty sure it’s more than appearance.

jcitybone

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/10/opinion/coronavirus-texas-fracking-layoffs.html

In reality, the dream was always an illusion, and its collapse was already underway. That’s because oil fracking has never been financially viable. America’s energy independence was built on an industry that is the very definition of dependent — dependent on investors to keeping pouring billions upon billions in capital into money-losing companies to fund their drilling. Investors were willing to do this only as long as oil prices, which are not under America’s control, were high — and when they believed that one day, profits would materialize.

Even before the coronavirus crisis, the spigot was drying up. Now, it has been shut off.

A deal, and higher oil prices, might help the industry. But they won’t fix its fundamental problem with profitability. Energy independence was a fever dream, fed by cheap debt and frothy capital markets.

All that’s left to tally is the environmental and financial damage. In the five years ending in April, there were 215 bankruptcies for oil and gas companies, involving $130 billion in debt, according to the law firm Haynes and Boone. Moody’s, the rating agency, said that in the third quarter of 2019, 91 percent of defaulted U.S. corporate debt was due to oil and gas companies. And North American oil and gas drillers have almost $100 billion of debt that is set to mature in the next four years.

It’s still unclear where most of this debt is held. Some of it has been packaged into so-called collateralized loan obligations, pieces of which are held by hedge funds. Some of it may be on bank balance sheets. Investors in the equity of these companies have already seen the value of their holdings decimated. Pension funds that have poured money into private equity firms may take a hit soon, too. All we know for sure is that fracking company executives and private equity financiers have made a fortune by touting the myth of energy independence — and they won’t be the ones who have to pick up the pieces.

polarbear4

I had to stop listening to this one from MICHAEL MOORE, as much as I love him. Voice to text always capitalizes Michael Moore’s full name – – no one else and apparently not in the possessive. lol

anyway, he’s strong on Biden now, on moving forward, or at least it seemed that way to me. Maybe I’ll try again when I feel a little better.

jcitybone

Another reason why I think there is more opportunity for progressives with Biden and a Dem Congress than with Trump and a split Congress.

https://nymag.com/intelligencer/2020/04/bernie-sanders-political-revolution-coronavirus-covid-19.html

Regardless, debating counterfactuals is only useful for interpreting the world. And for supporters of the socialist senator, the point has always been to change it. What this crisis might have done for the Sanders campaign is an interesting question; what opportunities it still presents for advancing progressive reform is an important one. And there is some reason to believe that the present emergency is (at least) as promising a vehicle for bottom-up social change as Sanders’s candidacy once was.

The senator’s advocacy for single-payer health care over the course of the 2020 race did little to increase public support for that policy; in fact, over Medicare for All became 24 percent less popular among Democratic voters between March and November of last year in Quinnipiac’s polling (a decline likely attributable to sustained attacks on the program from Sanders’s primary rivals). By contrast, between the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic and the end of March, support for Medicare for All jumped by nine points in Morning Consult’s survey.

Most promisingly, the pandemic is now broadcasting Sanders’s most vital message — that America’s working people deserve more than they’ve been given, and are (collectively) more powerful than they realize — at a volume too loud for plutocratic propaganda to drown out. The coronavirus has forced the U.S. government to inform grocery-store clerks, warehouse workers, delivery drivers, and crop hands that they are among our society’s most “essential” members — even as many of their employers have revealed a callous indifference to their personal safety. Together, these developments have fostered a wave of worker militancy, with warehouse strikes disrupting Amazon deliveries, and GE workers walking out in hopes of compelling their bosses to shift production away from jet engines and toward ventilators. This is the stuff that change is made of. A progressive movement capable of credibly threatening primary challenges would nudge Pelosi’s caucus leftward; a labor movement capable of credibly threatening to shutter Amazon’s supply chain, however, could turn Joe Biden into FDR.

If Democrats manage to win power this November, an advanced stage of the COVID crisis will almost certainly still be around to greet the new administration come January. According to the Congressional Budget Office’s latest projections, America’s unemployment rate will remain above 9 percent at the end of 2021. The damage that coronavirus is doing to the health-care industry’s finances, meanwhile, is likely to yield widespread premium hikes and hospital closures next year. An America in which the private sector durably fails to provide full employment or affordable health care is one in which the left will find broader sympathy for the Green New Deal and Medicare for All. And a well-organized progressive movement — proficient in the disparate arts of cajoling elites in smoke-filled rooms and emboldening workers on picket lines — could translate that public support into political revolution.

Benny

In theory, I would concur. And it’s possible Biden is willing to bend to provide some crumbs. But he is married to the banksters. That won’t change.

If I were Biden, I’d be saving my money to support my son. He’s about to be dragged through the mud. The things the corporate Dems were saying about Levi, Bernie’s son, and his early Vermont years, they will pale in comparison as what the GOP is going to do with Biden and his family. They plan to hold parts of the GE in the Senate chambers, and I think Bernie knows this, which is why he’s trying to put the finger in the very leaky vessel, and not harbor blame.

One thing that might save Biden’s candidacy is if there are no national debates.

jcitybone

Well it’s not that Biden and establishment Dems are going to give ground out of the goodness of their hearts. They have to fear what will happen to them if they don’t. We need to elect more progressives everywhere, and put the fear of god in more moderate Dems that they will get voted out. Progressives have zero leverage with a Trump and Republicans.

The most crucial election coming up is in Colorado where progressives should go all out to get Romanoff to beat Hickenlooper in the primary.

orlbucfan

We haven’t finished primary voting down here in the tourist-trap state. It was scheduled for August. Up in the air now.

polarbear4

Biden will likely win. Fractional voting algorithms and trump’s absolute ostentatious awfulness. bloomberg’s $$$

orlbucfan

pb4: OR hasn’t voted yet. My state has not finished state/local office primary voting. We don’t know what will happen?

wi64

If byedone wins all that means is Jill will be the unofficial 1st woman president or Bydones corporatist handler’s will tell her how to script Bydones policies.

Torabs
Torabs

This feels like something written by a Warren supporter.

jcitybone

https://thehill.com/opinion/campaign/492156-sanders-fate-sealed-by-the-over-40-crowd

My examination of voting patterns in this year’s Democratic primaries shows the real break between Sanders and Biden is not at college graduation, but at age 40.

Data from the Fox News Voter Analysis/AP Votecast of Super Tuesday found that Sanders finished first among voters between the ages of 30 and 39, with 43 percent of the vote. Among those in their 40s, Sanders only won 31 percent of the vote.

This pattern continued in the remaining contests that voted in March. Sanders won 60 percent of the votes among thirty-somethings in Arizona, but only 39 percent of those in their 40s; a 21 percent difference. There were similar large differences between the views of those ages 30 to 39 and those 40 to 49 in Missouri (59 percent to 38 percent), Illinois (54 percent to 35 percent) and Florida (45 percent to 24 percent). The numbers show those 40 and up were much less likely to vote for Sanders.

Americans in their 40s have experiences with America working to the benefit of all its citizens. Those in their 30s do not. The experience of millennials is one of anxiety, political crisis, the seeming inability to get ahead economically and a political system that has focused its attention elsewhere.

Millennials will only get older and their successor generation — Generation Z — shows early political signs that they are just as progressive. These two groups will increase their share of the electorate. They were outvoted in 2020 by older voters with a very different experience of American life. But in the next contested Democratic presidential primary, these voters will play an even larger role, and their twenty years of backing progressive campaigns may finally bring their choice to the front, and with it, significant changes in not only American politics and policy.

polarbear4

#SmashTheMachines

polarbear4

over 40s have more $$$$