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jcitybone

https://thehill.com/homenews/senate/554001-sanders-flexes-on-biden-seeking-to-shape-democratic-agenda

In speaking out, Sanders is acting as a counterweight to Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.), a centrist representing a state that is conservative. Manchin has worked to moderate Democratic proposals, and he has enormous power in a Senate equally divided between the two parties.

Sanders is the voice of progressives who want to expand the infrastructure bill by adding ambitious health insurance reforms to it.

While Manchin is interested in giving time for bipartisan talks to flourish, Sanders wants Biden and his party to move quickly to enact the biggest reforms possible.

The more outspoken role is a departure in some ways for Sanders, who adopted a lower profile during the homestretch of the 2020 election and during the early months of Biden’s transition and first 100 days in office.

But with no clear Senate Democratic plan yet for passing Biden’s infrastructure agenda, for moving a sweeping election reform package through the Senate or for bringing gun violence legislation to the floor, Sanders is starting to flex some muscle.

“He’s the left pressure,” said Faiz Shakir, a Sanders adviser. “Manchin’s the right pressure, [Sanders] is the left pressure. You can’t just let [Manchin] be the one who’s like ‘Cut this, cut that,’ without being on the other side making the argument for expanding it.”

Progressive activists are applauding Sanders for becoming more outspoken, and for asking why Schumer isn’t putting more pressure on Manchin and Sen. Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.), another key moderate, to line up with the rest of the Democratic caucus.

Some point out that progressives such as Sanders, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) haven’t been the problem in moving Biden’s agenda, despite expectations.

“This is not the way people expected the progressive wing of the party to work with Biden. They expected us to be the problem, it turns out Manchin and Sinema, the moderates, are the problems,” said Yvette Simpson, chief executive of Democracy for America, a grassroots progressive advocacy group.

Sanders has signaled growing impatience with the dragging negotiations between Manchin and a small group of moderate Senate Republican and Democratic colleagues over a scaled-down infrastructure bill, which doesn’t seem close to any sort of deal yet.

“We’ve talked about infrastructure for decades and the infrastructure only gets worse,” Sanders told The Hill. “There’s an understanding that we’ve got to do it. We can create good-paying jobs, and we will do it. If Republicans don’t want to come along, we’ll do it without them.”

“It has to be done as soon as possible,” he added.

Shakir said Sanders in the first part of the year was focused on making sure Biden’s $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief package wasn’t chopped down significantly.

“During that phase, even centrist Democrats and Republicans wanted to cut that number down from $1.9 billion to $1.2 billion,” Shakir recounted. “Now that that concluded, there’s this next phase of making sure that we don’t dither for too long and continue to deliver on the promises that the president has made.

“You will see Sen. Sanders push for and expand the scope of what is possible,” he added. “But we also know that now that you’ve got 50 Democratic votes in the Senate, a slight majority in the House and a president who is preparing to govern in a progressive way, the most powerful weapon we have is to say, ‘Hey, hold on the things you want to do.’ ”

“Time is our enemy and delay is our enemy,” Shakir said. “He will and does get impatient with people who want to slow down the process and say there’s a lot of time left because he doesn’t feel that way.

“He’s pushing his colleagues and the administration to make sure we don’t wait too long on moving to a second reconciliation package, especially as Republicans demonstrate they aren’t eager for a robust progressive agenda to pass.”

polarbear4

i still believe that Joe is OK with Manchin & Sinema. there are ways to bring them into line, not let them strut like peacocks. hope i’m wrong.

Torabs
Torabs

Bernie uses tweets, Manchin/Sinema withhold votes until they get what they want. That’s the big difference. Bernie’s statements are better than nothing, but I’d love to see a true progressive counterbalance to the craven, soulless Establishment.

jcitybone

jcitybone

Jayapal plays good cop here.

https://www.newyorker.com/news/the-political-scene/how-pramila-jayapal-views-the-biden-administration

As Joe Biden laid out a grand vision for his Presidency, in a speech before Congress late last month, cameras caught Representative Pramila Jayapal standing and applauding. Behind her face mask, she later told an aide, she was smiling. This was not the Joe Biden whom progressives like Jayapal expected to see when he meandered out of the Democratic pack and vanquished their champions, Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren, in last year’s primaries. That was the avuncular centrist who persuaded enough voters that he was the safe choice to beat Donald Trump in November. But this Joe Biden is going much, much bigger. As Jayapal said, “President Biden has risen to the moment, and I really do give him an ‘A’ in what he’s done so far. It’s been bold, it’s been progressive, it’s been what the country needs.”

Jayapal is the leader of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, whose ninety-five members have found themselves, to their surprise, pushing on an open door in the early months of the Biden Presidency. After years of frustration with the incrementalist approaches of the Party’s most powerful Democrats, they are backing a White House occupant who is pursuing progressive priorities more strongly than any President since Lyndon Johnson or Franklin Roosevelt. Biden’s agenda has only grown more ambitious, evident in his endorsement of federal legislation on voting rights and police reform; his $2.25 trillion jobs, infrastructure, and climate plan; and, now, his $1.8 trillion American Families Plan. “It feels like we’re actually doing what we came to Congress to do,” Jayapal said, when we spoke recently.

Jayapal was working from home, in Seattle, in early February, with the chatter of cable news in the background, when Biden stepped to a White House lectern to tout his American Rescue Plan and its $1.9 trillion in spending. He laid out the benefits, including relief checks, rental assistance, money for child care, and family leave—plus billions to cities, states, and small businesses. Though the principal motivation was the continuing fallout from covid-19, this was a wholehearted White House endorsement of spending priorities that Jayapal and her colleagues on the left of the Democratic Party had long advocated. But she really perked up when she heard Biden say, “The biggest risk is not going too big. . . . It’s if we go too small.” Jayapal called across the room to her husband, “That’s our line! He used our line!”

Embarking on Democratic control of the White House and Congress for the first time in a decade, Jayapal had been urging Party leaders to use the phrase and ditch the cautious solutions that had defined the Presidencies of Barack Obama and Bill Clinton. With slim majorities in the House and the Senate, the Senate filibuster stands in the way. Jayapal favors invoking procedural maneuvers—such as the budget-reconciliation process, if possible—or reforming or eliminating the filibuster, if necessary. Jayapal told me, “We can’t go back to voters and say, ‘You know what, I’m really sorry, but there are these racist, arcane Senate procedures that stopped us from doing what we said we would do if you gave us the House, the Senate, and the White House.’ ” In other words, go big, even if it means that Republicans may benefit when they next take charge of the upper chamber. “For anybody who says, ‘Well, then what happens if the Republicans are in power and then we don’t have any backstops?,’ I’d say, ‘If we don’t do this, they will be in power.’ ”

jcitybone

Great ad. The pile of plastic would be much higher in the U.S.

jcitybone

jcitybone

jcitybone

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/05/17/is-our-children-learning-republicans-hope-answer-is-no/

Pretty much everything the Trump-occupied Republican Party has been doing these days violates the basic tenets of democracy that American schoolchildren are taught.

But the Trumpy right has come up with an elegant remedy to relieve the cognitive dissonance: They want to cancel civics education. If the voters don’t know how the government is supposed to function, they’ll be none the wiser when it malfunctions — which has been pretty much all the time.

A bipartisan bill in Congress sponsored by Republican Sen. John Cornyn of Texas and Republican Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma (Disclosure: My wife’s stepmother, Rep. Rosa DeLauro of Connecticut, is one of the bill’s Democratic sponsors), would authorize $1 billion a year in grants to pay for more civics and history programs that teach children “to understand American Government and engage in American democratic practices as citizens and residents of the United States.” It’s as American — and as anodyne — as apple pie.

But, as The Post’s Laura Meckler reported over the weekend, “Conservative media and activists are pelting the Republicans who support the bill to abandon it. They call the grant program a ‘Trojan horse’ that would allow the Biden administration to push a liberal agenda.”

polarbear4

further than democrats.

wi63

Once the GQP achieves 1 party rule can the executions be far behind? Think it cant happen? Jan 6th did and no one thought that would happen either. Most Americans dont pay any attention to world history.

polarbear4

i know we will forever have a friendly disagreement on this.

i honestly don’t think it can, in the end. there might be a lot of bloodshed, but we do have the majority, and there’s plenty of military on our side, although way too much indoctrination and letting it slide under both parties, but especially the Rs.

but i believe we would fight, and once again, win, if it actually came to that.

imho, we already have something similar in what Obama began with Assange and now with Reality Winner and gosh i can’t think of his name now, the Iraq vet who sent the movie to Assange! i have a pin of him. geesh

black people and others being picked off.

jcitybone

jcitybone

https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2021/05/18/gabriel-adkins-police-urinating-property/?utm_source=reddit.com

Last month, Elizabeth City, N.C., council member Gabriel Adkins held back tears as he delivered a speech to his colleagues hours after police fatally shot Andrew Brown Jr., saying that he feared he might be next.

“As a Black man sitting here tonight, I’m afraid. I’m afraid that I may be the next one, you know,” Adkins said, alluding to Brown, a 42-year-old Black man whose attorneys have said was unarmed when police shot him outside his home.

Now, after joining protesters demanding that video of the shooting be released, he claims police are targeting him. Twice last week, Adkins said, surveillance video at a funeral home he owns showed a police officer in uniform urinating on his property.

“I’m completely furious that any member of the sheriff department would think these acts are acceptable,” Adkins told The Washington Post in an email. “This is a funeral home. A place where we house family’s loved ones. I have lost all trust and respect for our sheriff department.”

Torabs
Torabs

Sad. What will it take for liberals to realize defunding is the only solution?

jcitybone

https://apnews.com/article/us-news-ahmaud-arbery-business-legal-services-health-db65d3202a3a795e6cb65c78c9580121

President Joe Biden plans to take executive action Tuesday to ensure minorities, low-income Americans and others have better access to quality legal representation after services dwindled during the Trump administration.

Biden will sign a memorandum directing the Department of Justice to restore key functions of the shuttered Access to Justice Office and to reestablish the White House Legal Aid Interagency Roundtable.

The plans are laid out in a presidential memo first shared with The Associated Press. The White House said that Biden was directing the roundtable to examine the impact that the coronavirus pandemic has had on access to justice in both civil and criminal matters.

The pandemic “has further exposed and exacerbated inequities in our justice system” as legal services were curtailed, Biden wrote. He added that the problems “have touched the lives of many persons in this country, particularly low-income people and people of color.”

Tuesday’s memo is Biden’s latest step to work toward reforming the criminal justice system and advancing racial equity. It comes almost a year after the death of George Floyd sparked global protests and demands for action to address structural racism.

It builds on an executive order Biden signed on his first day in office establishing an initiative to prioritize equity in government operations. His proposed budget seeks $1.5 billion to strengthen state and local criminal justice systems, including public defenders. White House officials said the latest step will build on those efforts.

Aint Supposed to Die A Natural Death
Aint Supposed to Die A Natural Death

Thanks 42 for getting it started. (Was Clinton 42?) And muchas gracias jcb, you were ready to roll. I appreciate all of you deep divers here.

orlbucfan

Amen. T and R, 42!! 🙂

jcitybone

I must admit that I am 42. I was not logged in when I did the diary.

Benny

I thought it was penned by a dominoes player. 🙂

orlbucfan

🙂

Aint Supposed to Die A Natural Death
Aint Supposed to Die A Natural Death

Lol 🙂

orlbucfan

Well, T and R, jcb!! LOL 🙂

LieparDestin

..

Benny

I think he’s better off as an indie, but the Dems are reaching out because he would cipher votes from the Dem candidate, setting up the R to win. On the other hand, it would be good for Beto to have some competition.

polarbear4

oh, figures. i hadn’t realized. ty.

LieparDestin

LieparDestin

The true size of the force of undercover operatives, which is completely unregulated and has never been the subject of Congressional oversight, is unknown. However, after a two year investigation, Newsweek says it is 10 times the size of the CIA’s clandestine forces and has grown substantially in the past decade.

Its 60,000 members include cyber warriors who use false personas online to search for ‘high-value targets’.  

orlbucfan

Eric Prince is one of the head honchos, too.

polarbear4

good to see some coverage on this. surprised it’s newsweek. i’m sure, as you say, LD, the total is magnitudes larger, but just getting the idea in the public eye is good.

although many are probably “for” it.

LieparDestin

Benny

I wish this were “kidding” but it’s not. Disgusting.

polarbear4

yes, it is. and not nearly the outcry that others have seen, on my part of twitter, anyway. many must have left twitter, or only rarely post. i’m a lot less frequent, too, but i’d normally have a ton of RTs on something like this.

polarbear4

T&R, 42! Welcome! i was wondering about that, jcb. :o) so is @42 an old handle?

jcitybone

I think it was randomly assigned to me by the site.

LieparDestin

polarbear4

https://www.duffelblog.com/p/taliban-wonders-who-will-inadvertently?utm_campaign=post&utm_medium=web&utm_source=copy

The U.S. has stated that it appreciates the long and prosperous economic relationship it has had with the Taliban, but that it needs to evolve its business model to meet the demands of modern great power conflict.

“There’s been ups and downs, sure. But on the whole, we consider our long partnership with the Taliban a success that we can look back on with pride,” said Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin. “They did more for our defense budget than most mid-tier dictators and global terrorist networks ever could, and we were happy to repay them in kind by covering their bills for a couple decades.

“But the old reliables like Russia and China now offer a better way forward to justify our defense budget to the American people.”

it’s like the onion for military people.

polarbear4