HomeBernie Sanders5/21 News Roundup & Open Thread

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magsviewTorabspolarbear4Don midwestorlbucfan Recent comment authors

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jcitybone

polarbear4

cops gotta bully and sounds like yang is there for them.

jcitybone

polarbear4

propaganda is subtle, most often.

jcitybone

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/may/21/israel-gaza-conflict-biden-palestine?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_Other

It just so happened that Joe Biden was due to visit Detroit, home to the biggest Arab American community in the country, at the height of the latest upsurge in Israeli-Palestinian violence.

The sight of the presidential motorcade on Tuesday passing through a protest bedecked with Palestinian flags – and of Biden himself in heated discussion with Rashida Tlaib, the first Palestinian woman to be elected to Congress, on the Detroit airport tarmac – vividly illustrated the rapid shifts under way in US politics.

Welcoming Friday’s ceasefire, Biden said he would continue what he called his “quiet, relentless diplomacy”. But his emphasis through 11 days of bombs, rockets and bloodshed, on Israel’s right to self-defence, his refusal to demand a ceasefire or to join a UN security council statement to that effect, have exacted a political cost in the very constituency that was decisive in getting him elected.

In many ways, Biden was following a well-trodden path for US presidents, but the political downside of doing so is much greater now than it would have been just a few years ago, before a new generation of Democrats such as Tlaib arrived in Congress, and before the Black Lives Matter campaign made common cause with the Palestinians.

The same broad coalition that saved Biden’s primary campaign and helped get him across the line in November, could now become a powerful counterweight to the pro-Israeli traditions of the Democratic party.

World leaders hail Gaza-Israel ceasefire and vow to help Palestinians rebuildMillions of unemployed in US face hardship under Republican benefit cutsHow US cities’ police reform attempts led to pay bumps for officers‘Brazil is a global pariah’: Lula on his plot to end reign of ‘psychopath’ BolsonaroGovernment considers BBC shake-up after damning Diana reportLady Gaga says rape as teenager left her pregnant and caused ‘psychotic break’

“We’re in a moment of profound flux in society in general and things are moving very, very quickly and sometimes it takes moments like these to see how far things have shifted,” said Abdul El-Sayed, an epidemiologist, formerly Detroit’s former health director and candidate for governor, who addressed the protesters in Michigan on Tuesday.

“Joe Biden has, throughout his political history, been very, very good at reading the changes in temperature that occur, and I hope that he registers the fact that the base has also moved on this issue.”

US public sympathies are still mostly with the Israelis rather than the Palestinians. The ratio was 58% to 25% in a Gallup poll in March, but that still reflected a steady swing towards the Palestinians over recent years and the survey was taken before the most recent eruption of violence.

Similarly the centre of gravity in the Democratic party is still sympathetic towards Biden’s approach, but the direction of change is away from the reflexive support for Israel that has been the president’s hallmark throughout his long political career.

As a sign of things to come, progressives point to the ouster of the formerly powerful, pro-Israel chair of the House foreign affairs committee, Eliot Engel, by a political newcomer, Jamaal Bowman, in a Democratic primary last July. Bowman has since supported a bill that would regulate US military aid to Israel.

“The conversation has to change before the policy can change,” Mitchell said. “And right now we are seeing a radical change in the conversation surrounding Palestine.”

magsview

“And right now we are seeing a radical change in the conversation surrounding Palestine.”

About time and much welcomed by me! I’m still a bit afraid to hope, but it does seem like this time was different. People not buying the lies so much.

Don midwest
Don midwest

Another City is Possible

8 min video

Lauren Bon is an ecological artist and her practice, Metabolic Studio, explores self-sustaining and self-diversifying systems of exchange that feed emergent properties that regenerate the life web. Some of her works include: Not A Cornfield, which transformed and revived an industrial brownfield in downtown Los Angeles into a thirty-two-acre cornfield for one agricultural cycle; 100 Mules Walking the Los Angeles Aqueduct, a 240-mile performative action that aimed to reconnect the city of Los Angeles with the source of its water for the centenary of the opening of the Los Angeles Aqueduct. Her studio’s current work, Bending the River Back into the City, aims to utilize Los Angeles’ first private water right to deliver 106-acre feet of water annually from the LA River to over 50 acres of land in the historic core of downtown LA. This model can be replicated to regenerate the 52-mile LA River, reconnect it to its floodplain and form a citizens’ utility. Bon and Metabolic Studio have begun to realize this model by beginning to “undevelop” a Los Angeles River adjacent property, regenerating the soil to form a novel urban ecosystem. Four years into this work, it has created a self-generating and self-complicating urban haven best illustrated by the biological diversity that has re-emerged. They are looking to reinvigorate the endangered life web by creating urban island ecologies that can flourish.

polarbear4

woo hoo!

polarbear4

hope they’re including alcohol in that addiction training. the medical and dental professions have long blocked anything that might lower their pay or their status.

having lots of doctors and seeing them as regular people would do both. and we desperately need them. i remember posting something from a doctor in England, who lived in a nice neighborhood and drove a nice car, but didn’t feel “above” and was paid well, but not outlandishly, and was very happy. he was a real doctor who loved making people well.

what a fulfilling career if you like helping people… all the complexities of living a full life, especially for a gp–several generations of the same family, so deaths and new life and all that entails.

polarbear4

da do ron ron :o)

polarbear4

polarbear4

Exposing hypocrisy may feel good, but it does little actual good. The people who primarily identify as “taxpayers” are Trump and Pence’s base. Constantly repeating that their “taxpayer money” is being wasted only pressures them to violently defend their property, as the system encourages us all to do under stress. Yelling “Who’s the paid protester, now?” at America’s most basic bigot feels therapeutic, but it’s not powerful. For over 40 years, Democrats have chided the GOP for fiscal hypocrisy. What do they have to show for it? For over 40 years, Republicans have controlled the conventional wisdom around budgets, successfully using the “taxpayer money” myth to force Democrats to “starve the beast,” i.e., cut social spending to actually starve children, veterans, and many others.

Calling bluffs didn’t get Merrick Garland confirmed, it didn’t get the GOP to buy into a Heritage Foundation healthcare plan, and it won’t wean support for Mike Pence’s racist political theater. Everybody knows the Republicans are hypocrites and liars, just like everyone knows Donald Trump is a conman, a pig, and a megalomaniac. Yet Republicans now control 68 state legislatures, 34 governorships, and nearly every facet of the federal government.

When we reinforce the right wing’s racist, sexist, classist frames in an attempt to expose hypocrisy, we lose. If, instead, we root our politics in what is good and bad, just and unjust, moral and immoral, we can win.

Torabs
Torabs

Article is from 2017, but it articulates what I’ve felt for many years now, probably dating back to the Obama years. Scoring debate points by focusing on how awful Republicans are is a bit pointless when they and their voters wear their shittiness publicly, as a badge of honor. And yet the MSNBC flock continue on this pointless errand as a part of their bizarre tribalism.