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Don midwest
Don midwest

Is this a surprise?

Nancy Pelosi Plans To Go Easy On Big Pharma
Progressive advocates are angry about the speaker’s drug price proposal. Do Democrats care?

No, this is not The Onion

I sent an Onion piece to a friend recently that Judith Miller had been rehired by the NYT to cover the coming war with Iran. He didn’t realize that it was satire.

Don midwest
Don midwest

PIPELINE OPPONENTS STRIKE BACK AGAINST ANTI-PROTEST LAWS

OPPONENTS OF OIL and gas pipelines in three states are fighting back against new anti-protest laws aimed at suppressing fossil fuel industry dissent. Two lawsuits in Louisiana and South Dakota, and a promised suit in Texas, are the first signs of a concerted pushback against a nationwide, industry-led effort to halt the most confrontational arm of the climate movement. Since Donald Trump was inaugurated as president, at least 17 states have introduced laws that create new penalties for pipeline protesters.

It began in Oklahoma in May 2017. Gov. Mary Fallin quietly signed a law that made it a felony to trespass on property considered “critical infrastructure.” Perhaps even more egregious was language stating that any organization “found to be a conspirator” in the trespass would face fines of up to $1 million. With the Dakota Access pipeline fight at Standing Rock only recently winding down, and activists promising new protests against Oklahoma’s Diamond pipeline, it was clear what this was about. “Critical infrastructure” was defined to include oil and gas pipelines.

At the time, Donald Trump had just been sworn in, and more than a dozen anti-protest laws had been introduced across the U.S., attempting to criminalize a range of disruptive protest tactics, from blocking roads to heckling lawmakers. But two years later, it’s Oklahoma’s tack that has stuck. By December 2017, the American Legislative Exchange Council, a right-wing organization whose members include legislators and corporate lobbyists, had introduced a version of the bill as “model legislation” that it encouraged lawmakers to adopt across the U.S.

Don midwest
humphrey

polarbear4

polarbear4

polarbear4

Strange. I’m sorry they apparently pulled the corporate website. Now I’m curious as to how much control they have over the protests and how far down the chain of command do people realize who is behind it. I’m not ready to completely abandon extinction rebellion at this point.

polarbear4

Upon further reading, I’m now curious about Winter Oak, too. They seem to be either too purist even for me or intending to harm the climate movement.

polarbear4

Looks like purist. Glad to know about all this, though. Any chance of getting a longer time out time for the edit ability?

polarbear4

If anyone has a subscription to the financial times, there is this:

“Subscribe to read:
Extinction Rebellion went easy on big financiers of fossil fuels”

polarbear4

Lastly, Businesses Including Unilever Voice Support For Extinction Rebellion Protest https://www.plantbasednews.org/post/businesses-unilever-voice-support-extinction-rebellion-protest via @plantbasednews

polarbear4

Don midwest
Don midwest

Morning musings NOTE: Click on READ MORE at bottom to get format right My sister has lived in Tasmania for 30 years. It is an island state of Australia that is triangular shaped at about 30 miles on each edge. I was moving a bookshelf and considering if we would return for a second visit or not. It is a very long plane flight. Indigenous people of Australia have been there for 60,000 years.Here is a little information from wikipedia First arriving in Tasmania (then a peninsula of Australia) around 40,000 years ago, the ancestors of the Aboriginal Tasmanians were cut off from the Australian mainland by rising sea levels c. 6000 BC. They were entirely isolated from the rest of the human race for 8,000 years until British contact. Before British colonization in 1803, there were an estimated 3,000–15,000 Palawa.[a] The Palawa population suffered a drastic drop in numbers within three decades, so that by 1835 only some 400 full-blooded Tasmanian aborigines survived, most of this remnant being incarcerated in camps where all but 47 died within the following 12 years.[6] No consensus exists as to the cause, over which a major controversy arose.[b] The traditional view, still affirmed, held that this dramatic demographic collapse was the result of the impact of introduced diseases, rather than the consequence of policy.[7][8][9][10][c] Geoffrey Blainey, for example, wrote that by 1830 in Tasmania: “Disease had killed most of them but warfare and private violence had also been devastating.”[12][13] Henry Reynolds attributed the depletion to losses in the Black War.[14] Keith Windschuttle claimed that in addition to disease, the prostitution of women in a society already in decline, explained the extinction.[15] Many specialists in the history of colonialism and genocide, such as Ben Kiernan, Colin Tatz, and Benjamin Madley state that the Tasmanian decimation qualifies as genocide in terms of the definition set forth by Raphael Lemkin and adopted in the UN Genocide Convention.[16][17][18][d] In short, wiped out in the early 1800’s. I was considering saving or pitching a book written in 1937 before anthropological knowledge that appears above. “The original possessors of the soil of Tasmania were a race of blacks, their origin unknown and merely a matter of speculation. They were of a type differing from the natives occupying the mainland of Australia, having woolly hair of the Negro type, whereas the Australian blacks have long straight hair. They were, too, on a lower scale of civilization, having few accomplishments of any kind and were people whose condition is compared to that of the Drift and Cave men of Europe. Arts often attributed to them, should as the making of ground stone implements, of bone-pointed spears, baskets and the throwing-stick were only acquired after they had made contact with the Australian blacks or with Europeans. They wore no clothing, and had no knowledge of sewing skins together. Their principal diet was shellfish. Early voyagers relate that when scaled fish, cooked or raw, was offered to them they rejected it. It was a taste they had not acquired, for they had no knowledge of hos to catch fish.” Well, us Europeans sure were good at putting down “the other”! On my academia.edu account an article on the Pope’s Laudato Si came up. It points out the importance of the connection with nature and “the other.” It references new age thinkers and Naomi Klein about the relation of capitalism to the environmental crisis. Recall that when Trump visited the pope he was given a copy of the encyclicalTechno-Science, Integral Thought, and the Reality of Limits in Laudato Si’ Discussion of Pope Francis’s use of the term reality in Laudato Si’ in relation to techno-science and nature’s mystery. An understanding of Francis’s tempered enthusiasm for science and his careful delineation of “reality” highlights his worries about anthropocentrism and his concern for “the excluded” in the natural and human worlds. It also distinguishes his integral approach from forms of integral thought and integral ecology in a Wilberian vein that lead to hierarchical evaluation of humans and human culture, techno-optimism, and, in some cases, to climate skepticism. This kind of treatment was what I would have been comfortable with most of my life. It fits within the modern frame. After reading that I went back to Bruno Latour’s paper and found it much deeper. I had read it a few times already, but again the 6 page paper makes the case of the radical, and important nature of the encyclical. Religion has always been an essential aspect of his work. If you read only one of these two articles, I would recommend this one. The Great Clamor Channelled by Pope Francis The audacity of the Laudato Si! encyclical is equalled only by the multiple efforts to deaden as much as possible its message and effects. Once again, ecological questions, as soon as they are introduced into the regular course of our familiar thought patterns, modify from top to bottom the attitudes of all the protagonists. ‘How can a Pope dare to speak of ecology?’ ask both the faithful who expect an encyclical either to reinforce a doctrinal matter or clarify some moral question, and the indifferent who have never touched an encyclical in their lives, nor expected anything at all from the magisterium of the church. Many of the faithful block their ears so as not to hear the voice calling for radical conversion (§-114. “All of this shows the urgent need for us to move forward in a bold cultural revolution”) while the indifferent prick up their ears to listen to the voice of someone who they don’t for a second imagine could be ‘on their side’ (§-145. “The imposition of a dominant lifestyle linked to a single form of production can be just as harmful as the altering of ecosystems.”) Like all major religious or political texts, Laudato Si! requires a realignment of all established positions and requires one to take a stand in the midst of battles that one did not know to… Read more »

polarbear4

humphrey

I can’t happen soon enough!

humphrey

magsview

magsview

It’s live streaming and I think Shaun is speaking right now.

magsview

Shaun King speaking now

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magsview

One more ss

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magsview

ok, one more, lol

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humphrey

Bernie is live now!

humphrey

humphrey

humphrey

Straight forward and to the point.

humphrey

humphrey

humphrey

humphrey

polarbear4

Yeah, that cool demeanor and wry humor are important when you’re screwing over the people who voted you in.

humphrey

OzoneTom
OzoneTom

To make the process as transparent as possible, attract incredible coverage while building anticipation and viewership (as if any of those are desirable to TPTB):

I like the idea of using live and televised lottery-style selection by ping-pong balls — each bearing the likeness of a primary contestant.

Have two racks for the debate nights and alternate picking for each. As each candidate is pulled from the available pool and added to a night excitement would build. Pundits could opine as to what that means regarding prospects for each night.

humphrey

humphrey

humphrey

polarbear4

And we can thank this whole Clinton resistance for all the fear mongering about Russia and this making of war into a desirable state. Hill & co. played this “well.”

polarbear4

I had no idea that Niko House was so controversial.

“Tulsi Gabbard’s Top Online Fundraiser Is A Las Vegas Shooting Conspiracy Theorist”

https://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_5ce93de5e4b00356fc221861?

magsview

I had to stop following him on twitter after he had a kind of meltdown.

polarbear4

Yeah.

Don midwest
Don midwest

World trends show that Trump will win in 2020

In India, Narendra Modi won his re-election largely on the strength of his appeals to Hindu nationalism and anti-Muslim sentiment. In Australia, incumbent Scott Morrison ran against the high cost of climate action, including in lost jobs, and won a stunning upset. In the U.K., Trump surrogate Nigel Farage looks like he and his Brexit Party will be the runaway victors in the European elections. In Brazil and the Philippines, the political appeal of Bolsonaro and Duterte seems to be inversely correlated to their respect for human rights and the rule of law, to say nothing of modern ethical pieties.

more examples are in the article in the NYT today

How Trump Wins Next Year
What’s happened in India and Australia is a warning to the left.

In the background is a BookTV from 5/4/19 and Robert Reich is saying the same thing. The corporate dems have to wake up. The center is small. Their policies will not turn out the votes.

Guess where I found the link to this article

and

polarbear4

I’m not convinced that there isn’t vote manipulation. People are waking up to these right wing little tyrants.

polarbear4

polarbear4

Oops.

magsview

I’m reading people assuming that Bernie and Joe will end up debating at different nights for ratings purposes. But you and I all know that’d just be an excuse.

polarbear4

polarbear4

Exceptionally generous.

polarbear4

LieparDestin

Hello friends! I must say that The Great Sand Dunes National Park is one of the most beautiful places to exist in the world!

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LieparDestin

asdf

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LieparDestin

ghjk

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polarbear4

Thanks And glad you two are having a good time!

magsview

Thank you LD & great to see you JD!! XOXO

polarbear4

Stopped Kimberly Clark from doing this with a publicity campaign. Wonder if they are still abstaining.

magsview

polarbear4

polarbear4

For the bottom tweet.

humphrey

This link might be working better.

https://go.cnn.com/?stream=cnn%3Fsr

Well it did work for a while but seemed to have timed out.😪

magsview

It would time out on me then come back.

humphrey

One more try at a link!

polarbear4

Thread.

magsview

That’s our Bernie! 🙂

magsview

I love this one!

polarbear4

Oh, Her bring it in!

LieparDestin

Security was tight at ft worth as well. Metal detectors, snipers, drones… and couldnt even taje a soda can in

magsview

Snipers? wow

magsview

magsview

magsview

magsview

Bernie Sanders Is the Only Candidate to Vote Against All 3 Trump Military Budgets

As veterans of America’s forever wars, we were determined to find out if Sen. Sanders really was the only candidate to stand up to Trump’s budget bloat.

Turns out, he is!

https://vetsforbernie.org/2019/04/bernie-sanders-only-candidate-to-vote-against-all-3-trump-military-budgets/

magsview

magsview

magsview

For polarbear especially:

polarbear4

🙏🔥🦜🙏❤️🔥🦜

magsview

For jcitybone especially-p.s. a (much-deserved) parody account:

https://twitter.com/jenniferboobin/status/1132442655089209344

polarbear4

polarbear4

I’m sorry if it seems like I’m picking on Pete, but this seemed particularly relevant.

magsview

As far as I’m concerned, pick on Pete all you want. He seems far too malleable for my liking with his vague statements that seem designed to make him sound wise (or something), but that could be read in so many different ways.

Buttigieg, who said earlier in the day in a “Washington Post Live” interview that he disagreed with “the agenda of the Israeli political right wing,” elaborated on his concerns about Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s government during his meeting with the Jewish leaders, which was conducted off the record.

The article doesn’t include any insight on what Pete meant by “the agenda”.

He said American leadership regarding Israel is in particular need “at a moment like this.”

Nor did the article shed light on what Pete was referring to when he said “a moment like this”.

“The right approach when you have an ally or a friend that is taking steps that you think are harmful to you and to them, you put your arm around your friend and you try to guide them somewhere else,” Buttigieg said, according to the individuals in the room.

First of all, how patronizing! “you put your arm around your friend and try to guide” them? Because you’re so much smarter and wiser? And where/what is this “somewhere else” you want to “guide” them to?

The South Bend, Indiana, mayor told the group that the Trump administration’s decisions to move the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem and recognize Israeli sovereignty in the Golan Heights should have been done in the context of a Mideast peace deal or proposal.

So…does that mean ‘Mayor’ Pete was just fine with Israel’s moves, that Israel should have done that very same things, just differently?

Speaking of who was “in the room”:

Buttigieg’s comments came in a meeting with more than 40 Jewish religious, political and academic figures at the Washington offices of Bluelight Strategies, a communications firm founded by Steve Rabinowitz and Aaron Keyak that advises numerous Jewish organizations. Among those attending were Alan Gross, the former USAID contractor jailed for five years in Cuba, Democratic pollster Mark Mellman, former Obama administration sanctions czar Adam Szubin, and Washington Institute for Near East Policy Executive Director Robert Satloff, along with several rabbis.

Often while reading Buttigieg’s words I find myself wondering, “What does he really mean by that?”

Buttigieg said the way the decisions were timed and structured weren’t as much as shift in American policy as “a decision to intervene in Israeli domestic politics through American policy.”

I guess he’s talking about moving the American embassy there? So murky.

“And frankly, we shouldn’t be naïve to the domestic political consequences of the things we do or say,” Buttigieg said.

When he said, “domestic”, is he talking about U.S. politics? Israeli politics? Both?

polarbear4

❤️🦜🦜

magsview

I read that hummingbird eggs are the size of tic tacs. 🙂

polarbear4

polarbear4

Assange sent a letter to @GordonDimmack. I haven’t found it yet, but there’s this.

polarbear4

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