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Benny

Clyburn also endorsed Brandon Johnson in his runoff. Does this indicate he will support an African-American progressive if s/he is the sole POC in the race?

As this article points out, Pelosi endorsed Schiff already.

Benny

Benny

There’s a slight glee in my eyes on this protest: that it happened while David Ignatius was the host of the event.

orlbucfan

Blinken is a stupid joke.

wi65

One of way to many IMHO

Benny

Marketing and sales are becoming a tougher hill to climb. I don’t like cold calls either, and it’s so easy to pirate identity accounts.

orlbucfan

Scams follow the same formula, century after century. It really is sad how many suckers and rubes are out there.

wi65

Unless i recognise the number i dont bother answering anymore. The cold calls are out of hand same for texts and e-mails

Benny

Benny

Bernie has started a working relationship with Fain, but I think Fain is definitely his own man. Fain may have some leverage to encourage more incentives for workers, not for the companies but for the union members where they are employed.

orlbucfan

Byedone needs to lay off the petroleum permitting. Bought-off DINO.

Benny

Au Revoir. If it were a GOP pol, they wouldn’t care.

Benny

wi65

I’d be shocked if they did, after all Monopoly is the American way.

Benny

orlbucfan

That’s what I was referring to. 🙂

orlbucfan

Barfo Byedone actually has some decent people in place who will put the brakes on this sh1t.

Benny

I think they can but “will” is altogether another question.

Benny

1 dead, 3 wounded.

orlbucfan

JHCOAC! 💩💩💩💩

Benny

Benny

In the presser, Powell did not commit to pause in raising the rates further.

Benny

It increases our debt each time they do this.

orlbucfan

Powell is a tRump jackazz. Hubster and I get into a few heated spats over this yahoo.🤮🤮

Benny

I’m not entirely sure, but I think the Bennys saw him on the subway while in NYC last summer.

wi65

Intresting read;
Why the 14th Amendment Is Being Cited in the Debt Ceiling Debate

Some Biden administration officials believe a constitutional clause prevents the United States from failing to make payments even if it means breaching the debt limit.
Give this article

Shadow falls on the Capitol building with the American flag on the right corner of the frame.
The 14th Amendment includes a provision that protected public debt held by the federal government.Credit…Astrid Riecken for The New York Times

Linda Qiu
By Linda Qiu
May 2, 2023, 2:56 p.m. ET
WASHINGTON — Faced with an impasse over raising or suspending the nation’s debt limit, some White House officials are looking to a clause in the 14th Amendment to ensure the United States does not default on its debt.
The amendment, adopted after the Civil War, conferred citizenship to former slaves — and contains a more obscure section on public debt. Here is a brief history of the 14th Amendment and an explanation of its provisions, including why it’s now being talked about in the White House.
What does the 14th Amendment say?
Considered by historians to be a milestone for civil rights, the 14th Amendment to the Constitution extended citizenship to former slaves. It also guaranteed that the right to due process and equal protection under the law applied to both federal and state governments.
The expansive amendment is the most cited amendment in lawsuits, according to the Library of Congress.
Section 1 of the amendment established that “all persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the state wherein they reside” and that “no state shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States.”
Understand the U.S. Debt Ceiling
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What is the debt ceiling? The debt ceiling, also called the debt limit, is a cap on the total amount of money that the federal government is authorized to borrow via U.S. Treasury securities, such as bills and savings bonds, to fulfill its financial obligations. Because the United States runs budget deficits, it must borrow huge sums of money to pay its bills.
The limit has been hit. What now? America hit its technical debt limit on Jan. 19. The Treasury Department will now begin using “extraordinary measures” to continue paying the government’s obligations. These measures are essentially fiscal accounting tools that curb certain government investments so that the bills continue to be paid. Those options could be exhausted by June.
What is at stake? Once the government exhausts its extraordinary measures and runs out of cash, it would be unable to issue new debt and pay its bills. The government could wind up defaulting on its debt if it is unable to make required payments to its bondholders. Such a scenario would be economically devastating and could plunge the globe into a financial crisis.
Can the government do anything to forestall disaster? There is no official playbook for what Washington can do. But options do exist. The Treasury could try to prioritize payments, such as paying bondholders first. If the United States does default on its debt, which would rattle the markets, the Federal Reserve could theoretically step in to buy some of those Treasury bonds.
Why is there a limit on U.S. borrowing? According to the Constitution, Congress must authorize borrowing. The debt limit was instituted in the early 20th century so that the Treasury would not need to ask for permission each time it had to issue debt to pay bills.
Another provision, known as the Disqualification Clause, was more obscure until the events of Jan. 6, 2021. Some have argued that the clause, outlined in Section 3 of the 14th Amendment, bars anyone who has “engaged in insurrection or rebellion” from holding public office.
Now, the standoff over the national debt has renewed debate over Section 4 of the amendment, known as the public debt clause.
What spurred its adoption?
After the Civil War and the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, lawmakers sought to set out the terms of the Confederacy’s surrender and the rebellious states’ re-entry into the Union.
The 13th Amendment’s formal abolition of slavery also meant that the size of delegations from former Confederate states would increase, even as the states passed discriminatory “Black codes” and prevented former slaves from voting. Reconstructionist Republicans in Congress sought to address these issues by passing the Civil Rights Act of 1866, which guaranteed citizenship and equal protection for former slaves.
Although Republicans had enough votes to override a veto by President Andrew Johnson, some remained concerned that the protections in the law were not strong or permanent enough, and began seeking a constitutional amendment.
A joint committee on Reconstruction then drafted what would become the 14th Amendment, which was passed by Congress in 1866 and ratified two years later.
Why does it contain a public debt clause?
The 14th Amendment includes a provision that protected public debt held by the federal government, and prohibited payment of debt held by the Confederate states.
“The validity of the public debt of the United States, authorized by law, including debts incurred for payment of pensions and bounties for services in suppressing insurrection or rebellion, shall not be questioned,” the clause reads.
More on the Debt Limit
A Federal Showdown: The United States government is engaged in a high-stakes political battle over paying its debts — again. How did we get here?
G.O.P. Bill: The House approved legislation that would raise the debt limit for one year. President Biden has already said he would not sign it, but Republicans hope it will push Democrats to negotiate.
The Next Fight: Using an all-carrots, no sticks approach, Speaker Kevin McCarthy squeezed a debt ceiling increase out of House Republicans. He will be hard-pressed to do it again this summer.
Biden’s Big Choice: As the specters of national default and recession loom large, Biden must decide when and how aggressively to negotiate.
That section, historians say, was added because of fears that if former Confederate states were to regain political power in Congress, lawmakers might repudiate federal debts and guarantee Confederate debt. Reconstructionist Republicans also thought that the clause would discourage loans to future insurrectionists.
“Southerners were used to having their way in Congress — they had dominated the institution from 1787 until secession in 1861 — and many believed that when their representatives arrived in House and Senate, they would be able to tear up the nation’s i.o.u.s. Section 4 was the response,” Garrett Epps, a legal scholar, has previously written.
Why is it being discussed today?
Some legal scholars contend that the public debt clause overrides the statutory borrowing limit, which is set by Congress and can be lifted or suspended only with lawmaker approval.
The United States hit that cap on Jan. 19 and on Monday, Treasury Secretary Janet L. Yellen warned that the federal government could run out of cash to pay its bills by June 1 unless it was able to borrow more money.
The Biden administration is discussing whether the 14th Amendment compels the government to continue issuing new debt to pay bondholders, along with Social Security recipients, military personnel and others, even if Congress fails to lift the limit before the so-called X-date.
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orlbucfan

I can’t speak for anyone else, but I am sick and tired of these chickensh1t DINOs. That includes the semi-senile one at the top.🤮🤮