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Aint Supposed to Die A Natural DeathphatkhatBennypolarbear4wi65 Recent comment authors

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Paul ADK

Once, twice, thirty- four times a felon…

It’s good to know our justice system works somewhere, especially in jaded Manhattan. Which should have prosecuted him decades ago, we all knew. But better late than never.

Benny

Paul ADK

LOL! Perfect!!

Benny

This tweet is sweet to me because it was posted by Fetterman’s former Chief of Staff. I’m glad to see he got his sense of humor back on the Net.

Paul ADK

They may as well all just cut to the chase and start flying swastikas. That is where all this is headed, isn’t it? Actually the confederate battle flag would also do, those two are interchangeable.

wi66

This meter would work

Screenshot 2024-06-01 101103.png
phatkhat

The neo-Nazis in Germany fly the confederate flag, because the swastika is banned. So, yeah, interchangeable.

Benny

Dave Dayen

Juries Rule

The Sixth Amendment guarantees the right of all accused criminals to a trial by a jury of their peers. Donald Trump doesn’t believe he has any peers, let alone that 12 ordinary people should be able to dictate the circumstances of his penthouse life. He was wrong, and a means of delivering long-lost accountability in America was rediscovered, by stepping outside the class of elites who have failed in their role, and letting people chosen by lot decide.

There was a time during the running crime wave that has characterized the 21st century, amid unpunished torture and public corruption and financial fraud, where it was expressed that juries were simply too unsophisticated for the difficult business of holding criminal activity accountable. This was an excuse particularly fitted for the financial crisis, with its collateralized debt obligations and credit default swaps. Juries couldn’t possibly understand the complexities of modern finance, let alone modern law; their eyes will glaze over and the prosecution will lose.

One case actually revealed that argument for the pabulum it was: the 2013 prosecution of Fabrice “Fabulous Fab” Tourre, a mid-level Goldman Sachs trader, for securities fraud. It was a civil trial alleging that Tourre sold investors structured mortgage bonds while concealing the self-interest of the hedge fund, Paulson & Co., on the other side of the bet. Fabulous Fab wasn’t a major decision-maker at Goldman; if anything, he was a scapegoat. Anyway, this trial wouldn’t even put him in prison. (Tourre paid $825,000; he’s now an assistant professor at Baruch College.)

The jury knew that Tourre wasn’t the mastermind of the scheme. They knew he was being served up as a useful foil because his name was on a bunch of boastful emails. But they dug down and did their job, determining that the lack of disclosure was indeed a material misrepresentation to investors, whether Tourre led the effort or merely followed. There was a wonderful line said by one of the jurors, a priest named Rev. Beth Glover, after the case. She said, “They portrayed him as a cog, but in the end a machine is made up of cogs and he was a willing part of that.”

We’re at a stage with our criminal justice system where dispassionate application of law has to be celebrated. Too many prosecutors fear the consequences of losing a case as a higher priority than the job description of ensuring that crime has consequences. Too many judges, living in the same neighborhoods and going to the same schools as the white-collar defense lawyers in nice suits before their court, reason themselves out of delivering accountability. Media elites didn’t even want the Trump hush-money case to be filed; it wasn’t serious enough to rise to some Aaron Sorkin conception of bringing the mighty low.

It took jurors, those untutored jurors of varied backgrounds and classes, to pay attention, follow instructions, and issue a verdict. They were the only ones not marinated in the strange courtesies and protocols of the legal system, the only ones not concerned with their good standing in the eyes of their peers (I don’t mean peers as in jury members, but only those in their legal rarified air). The people who seem to be most serious about the law are not the ones who view it more as a debating society, but the ones who actually hear the evidence and reach conclusions.

This is not the only instance highlighting the importance of juries as a way to break the run of impunity in America. Google was found guilty of being a monopoly in a private antitrust case by a jury in San Francisco; the judge looking at the same question in D.C. district court inexplicably delayed closing arguments for six months and still hasn’t decided the case. Rather than being caught up with anguish over personal reputation or precedent-setting value, the jury responded that yeah, Google has a monopoly over app distribution on Android phones, that it used that power to take tolls for purchases made over the apps, and that this was anti-competitive. Just answering those questions was a revolutionary act.

Public disquiet about the state of the nation as “a dying empire led by bad people,” in the words of one pollster, is in my view connected to this ingrained belief that who you are matters more than what you did, that there are different justice systems for different people depending on their power and influence. At least some Americans simmering about that fact sit on juries, and get to have a voice in shaping that outcome, at least in their own sphere. I don’t beatify the jury, so much as I do a system that allows the facts of law to be worked through outside of the realities of privilege.

If we still had civics classes in America, one lesson would be taken up with discussing how, in this country, “nobody is above the law.” That hasn’t been true for a while, and a Trump guilty verdict doesn’t really change that; as others have said, there will be appeals, and the men in robes will get their chance to hold forth. What the verdict does show is that accountability, in the fleeting moments when it comes to the elites of this nation, has the face of the bartender and the nurse and the electrician. Justice is blind, but more so in the jury box.

wi66

“Too many judges, living in the same neighborhoods and going to the same schools as the white-collar defense lawyers in nice suits before their court, reason themselves out of delivering accountability.”

Geez he’s talking about that elite club the Federalist Society? Seems like it to me.

Benny

wi66

His cults heads are exploading once they see this. Order up extra Ketchup for his kitchen staff and cleaning supplies as well.

Benny

Benny

Biden is having a presser about Gaza. He claims Israel has a comprehensive plan for negotiations for ceasefire and prisoner exchange. It is a 3 stage process and includes bringing the remains of those who died back to the US.

Of course, the US will help with rebuilding of Gaza for displaced Palestinians, Biden says. Palestinians will be able to return to their homes in the North.

My question is what homes are they supposed to reclaim? Nearly every compound has been destroyed.

Benny

Biden’s presser was strictly to announce a ceasefire deal on the table; he took no questions.

He also made some remarks about the jury in Manhattan yesterday but I did not listen to that portion of the presser.

Benny

I think this is what Biden is referring to. Ryan Grim probably is the reporter to watch on this development.

wi66

Boy what a deal for the tax payers. We paid for the bombs that Isreal used, now we pay to rebuild what they destroyed…

Benny

And we still can’t have MfA because of these damned wars.

phatkhat

Maybe Israel needs to rebuild Gaza with their own money. After all, they are the ones who started this – decades ago. So we taxpayers pay to destroy Gaza, and now pay to rebuild it? Not that I don’t think the Gazans shouldn’t have their land rebuilt, but it’s basically gonna be a gut rehab. There’s not much left.

More likely, developers will be imported to rebuild it for wealthy people to enjoy.

wi66

Espically the ocean front areas.

phatkhat

Kushner has already discussed that.

jcitybone

Benny

Agree with Medhi on this one, but I’m not surprised this is happening.

Paul ADK

Absolutely. He could be picked up at the airport on the way in and transferred to the ICC for prosecution.

Benny

Rep Mark Pocan has threatened as such to have the ICJ serve a warrant if Bibi comes to Congress.

polarbear4
polarbear4

some people say we are captured by the Zionists. that they should register as foreign agents and we need to jail some of them. idk enough, but I know that do seem to run us, including killing and killing and killing. John Mearsheimer co-wrote a book on it.

wi66

its the $$$$$$$$, i dont think that most of the congresscritter care where it comes from. The presuit of $$$$$$$ will make you do things you normally wouldnt do.

phatkhat

The money and the evilgelicals who think it’s the end times and Israel is necessary to the plan.

Benny

Personally, I thought Biden made a mistake by commenting on the trial. That did politicize it.

Benny

Chicago came to my neck of the prairie on Wednesday and the Bennys went to see them. This is one of my favorite songs written by Robert Lamm, but sung at the time by Terry Kath and Peter Cetera. Along with the Beatles’ Revolution anthem, this is one that I see for the Progressive movement as it is timeless in its lyrics. I have not heard another version of this song.

polarbear4
polarbear4

I love them. remember playing them for my dad.

Paul ADK

The first four albums were excellent.

Benny

Actually number 5 is equally good to numbers 1 and 2.

phatkhat

I saw them in the flying saucer back in the day. 😉

Benny

Benny

I suppose they could ask for their money back, but the damage is done and Bibi will not rest until each Palestinian is dead or driven out to the desert.

wi66

A little late on that

Screenshot 2024-06-01 120005.png
phatkhat

Hey, Joe. Hamas didn’t start the war. It’s been going on for decades, and precedes Hamas. It’s been going on for, really, 75 years. Basing geopolitical decisions on a dubious 2000 years old holy writ is a bad decision. Read the OT. See what the Hebrews always did to any tribe not them on what they deemed their god-given lands.

And let me add, I do not have anything against the Jewish people at all. I have had so many wonderful Jewish friends over the years, dated a few, and belong to JVP. I do not consider being anti-Zionist to be anti-Semitic at all. There is room in Israel for Palestinians and Jews, if the Zionists would just quit trying to claim ALL of it.

wi66

Historically that part of the world has a lot of blood on its hands to do religious beliefs. Take away the “Crusades” for example we be alot better off with tech and other things that would benefit mankind.

Benny

Benny

polarbear4
polarbear4

never mind–hamas accepted it, i see further down–wow!

polarbear4
polarbear4

K. I don’t expect anyone’s mind to be changed or even to comment. But of all the videos I’ve shared, this one I will even beseech you to watch.

Jeffrey Sachs was the youngest tenured prof at Harvard (don’t know if he still holds that distinction), now works at Columbia University and works with the UN and developing countries all the time in economic development. You’ll hear some stories that he experienced, and a little of what he has lived through in regards to geopolitics. Most of all, you’ll hear an engaging account of what the heck happened with Ukraine that has been lived through from someone who makes a living knowing how to put facts into conversational prose. honestly, I listened the whole 2 hours and know more history, too, and I wasn’t even fidgety (of course, I was in a salt bath for the first hour on this Friday lol)

He talks about how he called Jake Sullivan early on and begged to just drop expanding NATO to Ukraine, explaining how it’s actually better for us to give others a little room. anyway, good stuff.

I know some of you likely hate Tucker, but he has changed and he mostly lets Sachs tell his tale. Pretty amazing stuff. Also about the Wuhan lab at the end. I’m surprised Tucker doesn’t make people subscribe for this, but he must want people to hear Sachs. As you may have guessed, they don’t take his calls anymore, but he is constantly traveling to the UN and to other countries, doing his thing. And I give kudos to Columbia for standing by him.

From https://csd.columbia.edu/sachs

Jeffrey D. Sachs is a world-renowned economics professor, bestselling author, innovative educator, and global leader in sustainable development. He is widely recognized for bold and effective strategies to address complex challenges including debt crises, hyperinflations, the transition from central planning to market economies, the control of AIDS, malaria, and other diseases, the escape from extreme poverty, and the battle against human-induced climate change.

Sachs serves as the Director of the Center for Sustainable Development at Columbia University, where he holds the rank of University Professor, the university’s highest academic rank. Sachs held the position of Director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University from 2002 to 2016. He is President of the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network, a commissioner of the UN Broadband Commission for Development, and an SDG Advocate for UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres. From 2001-18, Sachs served as Special Advisor to UN Secretaries-General Kofi Annan (2001-7), Ban Ki-moon (2008-16), and António Guterres (2017-18).

Sachs has authored and edited numerous books, including three New York Times bestsellers: The End of Poverty (2005), Common Wealth: Economics for a Crowded Planet (2008), and The Price of Civilization (2011). Other books include To Move the World: JFK’s Quest for Peace (2013), The Age of Sustainable Development (2015), Building the New American Economy: Smart, Fair & Sustainable (2017), A New Foreign Policy: Beyond American Exceptionalism (2018), and most recently, The Ages of Globalization: Geography, Technology, and Institutions (2020).

Sachs was the co-recipient of the 2015 Blue Planet Prize, the leading global prize for environmental leadership. He was twice named among Time magazine’s 100 most influential world leaders and has received 32 honorary doctorate degrees. The New York Times called Sachs “probably the most important economist in the world,” and Time magazine called Sachs “the world’s best-known economist.” A survey by The Economist ranked Sachs as among the three most influential living economists.

Prior to joining Columbia, Sachs spent over twenty years as a professor at Harvard University, most recently as the Galen L. Stone Professor of International Trade…

Enough of me blabbing on. Listen to a prof who is a hero of mine. please and thank you.

or here at Tucker’s site.

https://www.jeffsachs.org/interviewsandmedia/lhklf2aek7dtlkd9waelcy3xp8pd8a

polarbear4
polarbear4

p.s. that link is not tucker’s, it’s Jeff Sachs. JDS. huh.