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orlbucfan

T and R, and thanks Ms. Benny!! ☮️😊👍

jcitybone

jcitybone

Who could have guessed?

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/pharma-democrats-covid-19-vaccine-waiver-schakowsky-letter_n_60909efbe4b02e74d22aba89

All of the Democrats who are among Congress’s top recipients of pharmaceutical industry cash have yet to endorse waiving the rules on intellectual property rights for the COVID-19 vaccines that many experts say stand in the way of needed production.

Rep. Jan Schakowsky (D-Ill.) plans to unveil a letter to President Joe Biden on Tuesday calling for the White House to temporarily lift Trade-Related Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) that prevent many developing countries from manufacturing COVID-19 vaccines or treatments. The letter specifically calls for Biden to heed the appeals of India, South Africa and nearly 100 other developing countries that are asking for the waiver as they confront COVID-19 crises with far fewer resources.

A total of 110 of the 218 House Democrats, including Schakowsky, have signed the letter, ensuring it will have the support of a majority of the House Democratic Caucus.

But none of the nine House Democrats among Congress’s top 25 recipients of donations from pharmaceutical industry PACs in the 2020 election cycle have signed the letter.

As HuffPost reported last Wednesday, Democratic Reps. Scott Peters (Calif.) and Ron Kind (Wis.) ― Nos. 7 and 19, respectively, on the top 25 list ― have actually solicited support for another letter to Biden asking him to not waive the intellectual property rules.

HuffPost reached out to the remaining seven Democrats on the list to ask why they were not supporting the intellectual property waiver.

The offices of House Energy and Commerce Committee chair Frank Pallone of New Jersey (No. 4), House Ways and Means Committee chair Richard Neal of Massachusetts (No. 6), and Reps. Anna Eshoo of California (No. 9), Brad Schneider of Illinois (No. 20), Kurt Schrader of Oregon (No. 22) and Raul Ruiz of California (No. 25) did not respond to HuffPost’s requests for comment.

The office of Rep. Stephanie Murphy of Florida, another top recipient of pharmaceutical industry PAC contributions and co-chair of the influential centrist Blue Dog Coalition, did not respond either.

A spokesperson for Rep. Robin Kelly of Illinois (No. 17) provided a statement that mirrored what the pharmaceutical industry itself has been saying in opposition to the temporary waiver: That it would not alleviate the current shortage of vaccines.

jcitybone

What a surprise!

https://www.opensecrets.org/news/2021/05/big-pharma-shatters-q1-lobby/?utm_source=reddit&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=r%2F_bigphrml-05%2F04%2F20

Pharmaceutical companies are kicking 2021 off with a pricey start, spending a record $92 million to lobby the federal government on drug pricing regulations and rules governing the distribution of COVID-19 vaccinations.

The industry’s spending in the first three months of 2021 represents a 6.3 percent increase over the same time period last year, putting drug companies on track to break their combined all-time spending record for the second year in a row. Private manufacturers of pharmaceuticals and health products typically far outspend other industries to lobby Washington. In 2021, the industry has already spent more than double the sum spent by the second highest-spending industry.

The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, the nation’s largest pharmaceutical trade association, is perennially the industry’s largest lobbying spender and this year is no exception. So far, the association has spent $8.7 million on K Street. Industry giants Pfizer and Roche Holdings rang in as the No. 2 and 3 lobbying clients, spending $3.7 million and $3.6 million respectively.

jcitybone

https://jacobinmag.com/2021/05/senator-chris-coons-vaccine-patent-remarks-csis-cold-war-red-scare/

In this spirit, as the Financial Times reported last week, industry lobbyists are increasingly turning to geopolitical arguments designed to reframe a planetwide public health crisis as just another front in the new cold war between America and its rivals — raising the specter of Russia and China acquiring state secrets that could (*shudder*) expedite the development of other vaccines or, still worse, “therapeutics for conditions such as cancer and heart problems in the future.”

Nasty and cruel as the argument sounds when framed in these terms, it’s somehow found an even more contemptible expression, courtesy of none other than Chris Coons — Joe Biden’s close ally and Senate successor in Delaware, and one of Big Pharma’s most reliable tribunes in Washington.

Speaking at an April 22 event hosted by the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Coons proceeded to recite many of the familiar bad arguments made in favor of the current, Big Pharma–approved intellectual property regime. At the conclusion of his remarks, however, the senator threw a rhetorical curveball — invoking Cold War politics while somehow shoehorning the January 6 storming of the US Capitol into parochial talking points about scientific research and geopolitical rivalry.

In a sense, Coons’s absurd framing is useful because it strips the terrible arguments made by the likes of Bill Gates of any artifice and transforms a question of global public health into one of naked imperial self-interest. Awkward and out of place as it seems, even his reference to the events of January 6 is clearly intended in this spirit: the implication being that America can and should try to rectify its internal cultural divisions by rallying the nation against global competitors (and, in this case, depriving people in the poorest parts of the world of lifesaving vaccines that could be produced much more rapidly if patents were shared).

It’s as grotesque and immoral as any argument for patent hoarding made yet. And it’s a further reminder that embedded interests and their political mouthpieces will stop at nothing to protect the profits of pharmaceutical companies, global pandemic be damned.

jcitybone

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/may/03/joe-biden-taxes-corporations-richest-americans

Joe Biden said it is time for corporations and the richest Americans to “start paying their fair share” of taxes as he hit the road on Monday in a concerted effort to promote his administration’s huge new infrastructure and welfare spending plans totaling about $4tn.

Speaking at a community college in Norfolk, Virginia, on Monday afternoon, the US president made the case for increasing taxes on the wealthiest in the US in order to help fund his ambitious $1.8tn American Families Plan and $2tn infrastructure plan.

The packages would provide funds for childcare and free universal pre-school education facilities, as well as massive programs to rebuild America’s crumbling transport systems and public-sector housing in ways that also contributes to government action on the climate crisis.

“I think it’s about time we started giving tax breaks and tax benefits to working-class families and middle-class families, instead of just the very wealthy,” Biden said, while speaking in Portsmouth, Virginia.

Discussing the excessive profits wealthy corporations have made in the past year, Biden said he’s not “anti-corporate”, but “it’s about time they started paying their fair share”.


Biden said the American families plan, which would dedicate $1tn in spending on education and childcare over 10 years, and $800bn in tax credits aimed at middle- and low-income families would not increase taxes for the vast majority of people in the US.

“It is paid for by making sure corporate America and the wealthiest 1% … just pay their fair share,” he said. Biden said the plan would benefit 65 million children, and “cut child poverty in half this year”.

jcitybone

As usual Republicans are full of bull.

https://www.salon.com/2021/05/04/republicans-go-after-woke-corporations–but-want-to-keep-massive-corporate-tax-cut/

Republican lawmakers have threatened to crack down on corporate tax cuts and subsidies even as the party mounts a unified front to defend the Trump tax cuts that dramatically slashed the corporate tax rate to its lowest level in decades.

Republicans have railed against President Joe Biden’s proposed tax increases on corporations and the wealthy, repeating dubious arguments that a slight increase in the corporate tax rate would make the United States less “competitive.” But Republicans aren’t just battling the Biden administration. They’re also up against a growing majority of Americans demanding big business pay their “fair share.”

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said on Monday that there will be “none, zero” support from Republicans for Biden’s proposal. “We’re not willing to pay for it by undoing the 2017 bill,” he added, calling it the Trump era’s “most significant domestic accomplishment” even though it failed to meet any of the party’s stated goals, such as higher longterm corporate investments, increasing hiring and wages or paying for itself.

Rep. Kevin Brady, R-Texas, the author of the 2017 tax bill, vowed on Monday that “there’s going to be a real fight over these tax increases” because “we shouldn’t be funding infrastructure on the backs of American workers.”

But Brady’s party is pushing a bill that would shift the entire tax burden of infrastructure investments from corporations to workers, while Biden has so far made good on his promise not to raise taxes on households earning under $400,000 per year. Congressional estimates show that the vast majority of Americans will see a tax cut under Biden’s policies and those making less than $75,000 will, on average, owe no federal income taxes this year. Most of Biden’s proposed tax cuts target big businesses, multinational corporations and those earning over $500,000, although his proposed corporate tax increase to 28% would not even fully reverse Trump’s cut.

Republicans, who have long espoused widely-discredited claims that their tax cuts boost the middle class, have offered Biden a counterproposal, investing less than a third the amount in Biden’s plan, entirely funded by “user fees” that would primarily hit lower-income workers. Even Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., who has backed Republican efforts to reduce Biden’s proposed corporate tax hike, slammed the GOP proposal for making it “harder on the working person.”

“Hell no, don’t raise them!” Manchin told reporters last week, warning that commuters would be hit the hardest.

Since corporations stand to benefit the most from improved infrastructure, “it is arguably fair to tax them to pay for it,” Liscow said. “Unless the user fees target activities that are bad for society or policymakers actually want to target lower-income parties with their revenue collection, there aren’t good reasons to use user fees instead of corporate taxes to fund infrastructure.”

jcitybone

wi63

To name a few, Cruz ,Turtle, Johnson (Wi), the Trio from Fla and the Q nuts and Cult 45 are all full of shit to be kind. Sadly to many cultists hang on thier every word

wi63

American capitalism where the needs of the few outweigh the needs of the many no matter what. Me, i’m sick of the entitlement of greed in this country.

jcitybone

https://www.lgbtqnation.com/2021/05/fox-news-aired-126-segments-trans-student-athletes-find-nine-nationwide/

Fox News has spent the past year warning viewers about the non-existent “dangers” of transgender student-athletes. The channel has spent more time on the topic in just the first months of this year than it did in the past two years combined.

With 126 segments on the topic since 2019, the channel was only able to reference nine athletes from around the nation – and more than a third of those segments were about two former high school students who haven’t competed in years. None of the athletes dominated their sport.

The channel has aired 72 discussions about trans-student athletes since January 1. None of them framed transgender people in a positive light. Anchors, hosts, and guests also referenced the topic another 58 times according to the watchdog group Media Matters.

The two girls mentioned most often – Andraya Yearwood and Terry Miller, who are both Black trans runners from Connecticut – were targeted by the religious right and the anti-LGBTQ hate group Alliance Defending Freedom. A group of parents filed a court case seeking to prevent them from competing; the case was dismissed.

All athletes are entitled to play school sports under federal law. Title IX bans discrimination against LGBTQ people in education, and school sports are part of education.

“Fox’s obsession with trans athletes is a key component of the right’s vitriolic campaign to make them into a political and cultural wedge issue while putting trans kids and families in danger in the process,” the group says, noting that the more the channel has demonized trans youth, the more state legislation has been introduced to ban them from participating.

wi63

One thing about the Faux fascist news is they always need a target to keep the cult afraid and frothing at the mouth. They serve no other purpose -a dangerous one at that

jcitybone

Krugman talking sense

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/03/opinion/biden-family-aid.html

There’s a good case for doing more to improve physical assets like roads, water supplies and broadband networks. There’s an overwhelming case for doing more to help families with children.

To Republican politicians, however, the opposite is true. G.O.P. opposition to President Biden’s infrastructure plans has felt low-energy, mainly involving word games about the meaning of “infrastructure” and tired repetition of old slogans about big government and job-killing tax hikes. Attacks on the family plan have, though, been truly venomous; Republicans seem really upset about proposals to spend more on child care and education.

Which is not to say that the arguments they’ve been making are honest.

How do we know that we should be spending more on families? There is, it turns out, a lot of evidence that there are big returns to helping children and their parents — stronger evidence, if truth be told, than there is for high returns to improved physical infrastructure.

There’s a good case for doing more to improve physical assets like roads, water supplies and broadband networks. There’s an overwhelming case for doing more to help families with children.

To Republican politicians, however, the opposite is true. G.O.P. opposition to President Biden’s infrastructure plans has felt low-energy, mainly involving word games about the meaning of “infrastructure” and tired repetition of old slogans about big government and job-killing tax hikes. Attacks on the family plan have, though, been truly venomous; Republicans seem really upset about proposals to spend more on child care and education.

Which is not to say that the arguments they’ve been making are honest.

How do we know that we should be spending more on families? There is, it turns out, a lot of evidence that there are big returns to helping children and their parents — stronger evidence, if truth be told, than there is for high returns to improved physical infrastructure.

For example, researchers have looked into the long-term effects of the food stamp program, which was rolled out gradually across the country in the 1960s and 1970s. Children who had early access to food stamps, the Washington Center for Equitable Growth concluded, “grew up to be better educated and have healthier, longer and more productive lives.” Researchers have found similar effects for children whose families received access to the earned-income tax credit and Medicaid.

So there are good reasons to believe that providing more aid to families with children would, in addition to helping Americans in need, make our economy stronger in the long run. And I can’t help contrasting the solid evidence for economic benefits from helping children with the total lack of evidence for economic payoffs to the tax cuts that have long been the right’s answer to every problem.

jcitybone

jcitybone