HomeBernie Sanders6/2 News Roundup & Bernie at Arab American Caucus #CADem2019

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orlbucfanWindDancer13NYCVGjcityboneBenny Recent comment authors

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polarbear4

polarbear4

If this weren’t so important, it would be laughable.

polarbear4

polarbear4

Both Ravitch and TrekkerTeach are earnest and hard-working advocates for education.

Don midwest
Don midwest

well, on the WA Post today there was an article on the dinosaur guy who heads the Smithsonian’s dinosaur’s work. in the article we find “The David H. Koch Hall of Fossils — Deep Time” reopens June 8 after a five-year, $125 million renovation, the largest in the museum’s 109-year history. “Deep Time” examines more than 3.7 billion years of life on Earth, using nearly 700 fossil specimens and other artifacts to tell a complex story. The completely revamped gallery features updated technology, as well as interactive displays that invite visitors to participate rather than merely observe. well, Koch’s buying legitimacy. They couldn’t do it by getting elected, so they have bought the government. And appealing to thoughtful people and even KIDS through this most expensive renovation. At same time get political support from right wing. Kochs also at MIT, Metropolitan Opera, buying and placing professors in colleges, etc. The Here is the link to the article but not necessary to read it. As a kid, Matthew Carrano was obsessed with dinosaurs. Now he’s one of the world’s experts. I looked up The Smithsonian Institution was established by an act of Congress in 1846 as an independent federal trust instrumentality, a unique public-private partnership that has proven its value as a cultural and scientific resource for more than 170 years. The federal commitment provides the foundation for all we do, and is especially helpful in attracting private support. We leverage our federal funding to enrich the lives of the American people and advance our mission for “the increase and diffusion of knowledge.” Congress vested responsibility for the administration of the Smithsonian in a Board of Regents, consisting of the Chief Justice of the United States, the Vice President of the United States, three members of the United States Senate, three members of the United States House of Representatives, and nine citizens. The Board of Regents meets at least four times each year and typically convenes in the Regents Room. The head of the Smithsonian is the Secretary, who is appointed by the Board of Regents. The Secretary oversees 19 museums, 21 libraries, the National Zoo, numerous education and research centers, including the Smithsonian Astrophysics Observatory, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, and Smithsonian Science Education Center. Notice politicians in prominent roles – Chief Justice, VP, etc. *** Here is what I wanted to get to. A radical artist who I had never heard of (I know almost nothing about art especially modern art.) Just as Kock engagement noted above, Art is a currency traded by the 1% and used to enforce neo liberalism The following is a book review and copied from a pdf on the screen so the bold title of the book and other stuff does not show up. BOOK REVIEWED: Hito Steyerl, Duty Free Art: Art in the Age of Planetary Civil War . New York: Verso, 2017 Based in Berlin, Steyerl holds a PhD in Philosophy from the Akademie der Bil-denden Künste in Vienna, and currently teaches experimental video and film at the Universität der Künst Berlin. In the last decade, dozens of solo exhibitions mounted around the world have secured her reputation as one of the most acclaimed and radically contemporary artists of the twenty-first century, while publications like the essay collection The Wretched of the Screen (2012) attest to the development of an important new voice in aesthetic theory, media studies, and institutional critique. Duty Free Art: Art in the Age of Planetary Civil War gathers together fifteen of Steyerl’s texts, many of which began as talks before making their way to the pages of the vanguard art and theory journal e-flux . They range across an impressively eclectic expanse of problems: the collection’s eponymous essay, which takes the catastrophe of the Syrian Civil War and the development of tax-free art-storage facilities as occasions for rethinking the political responsibilities of the museum, is followed by a reflection on Spam (the mostly fake meat), spam (the mostly fake correspondence), and “Spam” (the legendary Monty Python sketch). Its topical diversity notwithstanding, Duty Free Art coheres around Steyerl’s unflinching commitment to accounting for how art really functions in a global landscape shaped by privatization, financialization, and militarization—how art’s instruments and institutions often work as accomplices, wittingly or not, to the forces of neoliberal stasis (which, citing the work of Giorgio Agamben, she reminds us means not only immutability but also civil war). Steyerl’s book figures as a crucial contribution to the discourse on contemporary art and media, and is all the more remarkable for the bone-dry, goofball wit with which she unfolds her decidedly bleak picture of contemporary art’s entanglements. Perhaps the best way to gain entry to the sometimes dizzying textual labyrinth of Duty Free Art is via the narrow passage between two of the most alarming documentary images through which Steyerl indexes and diagnoses our “age of planetary civil war.” Indeed, such images play an overdetermined role in Steyerl’s text: objects of her arguments, they are sometimes also the very medium in which an argument unfolds. The first, and the one with which the book’s first essay opens, is of a long-retired Soviet-era battle tank, part of a World War II memorial in Ukraine seen in 2014 just as pro-Russian separatists drive it off its pedestal and “back” into battle. Forcing an historical monument to serve as an instrument of contemporary reactionary violence—an extraordinary assault on historical memory itself—the militants attack a checkpoint, wounding and killing Ukrainians in the process. The second, less immediately horrifying image shows us Geneva Free Ports—a massive, armored storage facility located within a Special Economic Zone, sheltered by and exempted from the laws of the nation-state. This complex is said to house “thousands of Picassos” and, though lax documentation and devised opacity have made it impossible for us to know what Geneva Free Ports contains, “there is little doubt,” Steyerl avers, “that its contents could compete with any very large museum.” What are we meant to see inscribed… Read more »

Don midwest
Don midwest

click on “read more” at the bottom of the page to get proper formatting it the entire comment comes up as one big blob

polarbear4

polarbear4

State level tricks to suppress and eliminate progressives.

Benny

Hi Birdies…just got back into town.

I opened my FB account when I got home and this video was on my feed:

Love it! #CA Feels the Bern!

jcitybone

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/02/us/politics/bernie-sanders-donor-event.htm

Senator Bernie Sanders has long promised to run a different kind of campaign and be a different kind of president. On Saturday night, what was billed as his first “grass-roots fund-raiser” of the 2020 campaign was certainly different, as donor events go.

It was at a nightclub, for one thing. The D.J. was spinning a mix that included “Eye of the Tiger,” the underdog anthem from the “Rocky” movie series. Tickets were as cheap as $27, for another. There were food trucks out back (tacos and a Taiwanese-Korean blend).

The night had the vibe of a Sanders rally, only smaller, darker and more intimate, and with booze. Disco balls dangled from the ceiling. When the lights flashed briefly during his remarks, Mr. Sanders joked about the special effects.

“Very sophisticated,” he deadpanned. “Either that or someone was leaning on the light switch.”

People laughed. This was, after all, Mr. Sanders’s crowd to lose, and he did not lose them, despite some delays before taking the stage.

The campaign said it had sold out all 1,000 tickets for the evening. They declined to say how much money had been raised.

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Benny

Cheap tickets, eh. You get an opportunity to help a progressive candidate become POTUS and on an avg person’s salary. Very different from a fundraiser Harris was at with some billionaires.

jcitybone

https://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2019/06/02/sanders_not_enough_to_defeat_trump_must_address_the_reasons_why_trump_got_elected_in_the_first_place.html

Cenk Uygur of “The Young Turks” interviews Sen. Bernie Sanders about his campaign for president and why he thinks he is the best among the Democratic candidates to defeat Donald Trump

CENK UYGUR: Naomi Klein said on “The Young Turks” that if we just get rid of Donald Trump we’ll be back to a situation that is so bad it created Trump.

BERNIE SANDERS: She’s exactly right, that’s exactly the point. And that is, look, we all want to beat the worst president in American history. No ifs, buts, or maybes on that. If I lose this thing I will be there doing everything I can to defeat Trump. But you want to address the reasons why Trump got elected in the first place.

What was that? It is because for too long the Democratic establishment has ignored the needs of working people all over this country. People work longer hours for lower wages. 40 million people living in poverty. The only major country not to guarantee healthcare to all people as a right. A vigorous effort to combat climate change, dealing with criminal justice reform, immigration reform. Those are issues that are not only the major issues facing this country, income and wealth inequality — how do you not talk about that? We have got to talk about that because it is the right thing to do and it is the way you win an election.

CENK UYGUR: You mentioned there that if you don’t win the primary, you’ll support whoever the Democratic candidate is. You get asked that question all the time. What I’ve noticed is the other candidates don’t get asked that question of whether they’ll support you.

polarbear4

polarbear4

WindDancer13

The Age of Deception (start at 1:13, unless you actually like commercials):

polarbear4

polarbear4

polarbear4

polarbear4

polarbear4

jcitybone

Bernie’s NY Times op ed: I Know Where I Came From. Does President Trump?

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/02/opinion/bernie-sanders-trump.html

My father came to this country from Poland at the age of 17 with barely a nickel in his pocket. I spent my first 18 years, before I left home for college, in a three-and-a-half-room, rent-controlled apartment in Brooklyn. My mother’s dream was to own her own home, but we never came close. My father’s salary as a paint salesman paid for basic necessities, but never much more.

As a young man I learned the impact that lack of money had on family life. Every major household purchase was accompanied by arguments between my parents.

I remember being yelled at for going to the wrong store for groceries and paying more than I should have. I’ve never forgotten the incredible stress of not having much money, a reality that millions of American families experience today.

We are the wealthiest nation in the history of the world and, according to President Trump, the economy is “booming.” Yet most Americans have little or no savings and live paycheck to paycheck.

Benny

Diary up at TOP about this op-ed too.

polarbear4

polarbear4

Dammit. I got to see puffins on the very northwest corner of the lower 48 on a reservation on the coast. Makah.

polarbear4

hmmm.🤷🏻‍♀️

polarbear4

Last one. Lots of good revolution songs in this thread.

orlbucfan

T and R, and thanks (!) mags!! 🙂

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