HomeUncategorized8/27 News Roundup & Open Thread – Sanders Addresses The 76th UE National Convention, Bernie Could Be The Best Arts President & More

89
Leave a Reply

avatar
Photo and Image Files
 
 
 
Audio and Video Files
 
 
 
Other File Types
 
 
 
47 Comment threads
42 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
11 Comment authors
wi61magsviewWindDancer13Aint Supposed to Die A Natural DeathLaura Recent comment authors

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
jcitybone

https://www.thedailybeast.com/bernie-sanders-out-raises-joe-biden-in-obama-trump-swing-counties

According to an analysis of Federal Election Commission data on the Democratic online giving portal ActBlue, 12,040 donors from those Obama-Trump counties made 19,885 donations to Biden during the first six months of 2019. By contrast, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) had 13,674 donors make 26,298 donations from those counties and South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg had 14,294 donors make 23,320 donations from those counties.

Biden has only been in the race since late April, compared to Warren and Buttigieg, who had launched presidential exploratory committees by the beginning of 2019 and late January respectively. But the latter two have had stronger fundraising months more recently. All three of them trail Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT)—whose campaign helped compile the data—when it comes to donors from Obama-Trump counties. The Democratic-Socialist had 33,185 donors make 81,841 donations in those areas, a haul that his team was eager to tout.

“To defeat Donald Trump, we will need to drive turnout to historic levels in every county in America—and these numbers show that Bernie Sanders’ campaign is building a huge and diverse grassroots movement to do exactly that,” campaign manager Faiz Shakir told The Daily Beast, calling his candidate “best positioned to defeat Trump.”

Biden and his team have made the case that he can resuscitate the Obama-era Democratic coalition and have leaned heavily on public opinion polls showing him beating Trump in hypothetical matchups by larger margins than his primary opponents. Sanders campaign has responded by noting that he has consistently beat Trump in early head-to-head polling too; in fact, the senator’s team has tried to make a concerted effort to prove that he is more electable that Biden.

polarbear4

excellent thread by this immigration lawyer.

jcitybone

https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/08/27/we-need-moment-transcendence-us-reignite-national-imagination-says-sanders-campaign

More than anyone currently in the race, Turner explained, Sanders has the potential to inspire broadly and draw huge turnout. “Why?” she said. “Because of his vision and because of his consistency and because of his authenticity.”

“There is a difference,” she continued, “between candidates running just to become president and having a presidential candidate that says I am running not just for me to become the president of the United States, but to movement build—that’s Senator Bernie Sanders. Because he has said this is not about him—this is about us and I’m going to need all of you.”

Turner said Sanders is unique among candidates when he tells audiences at rallies that his possible victory will mean very little without a movement behind him. Turner said no other candidate is even coming close to saying that. “That’s about expansion, right there,” she said. “People got it wrong if they don’t understand. It’s not just about who has the best ideas, it’s about who can excite.”

But while Sanders continues to draw crowds across the country in venues large and small, Turner says the campaign believes the size of the event is not as important as the message the campaign is communicating and the kind of listening and storytelling that is taking place as the senator and his team criss-cross the nation.

“Those large rallies—people chanting ‘Bernie! Bernie!’—that excites people,” she explained, “but can we can get into rooms with just a hundred people and have a conversation about the type of future that they want to win. It’s both/and, not either/or.”

“Hell, I’ll go into a room with five people,” added Turner. “Because if we can win five people over, you multiply that.”

And this, she said, “is the way we win.”

polarbear4

polarbear4

polarbear4

WindDancer13

Is it a good place to store nuts? No, it is already full. Well, he won’t miss just one then. Hope it doesn’t poison me!

polarbear4

polarbear4

jcitybone

https://www.theverge.com/2019/8/27/20835018/bernie-sanders-targeted-advertising-tax-google-facebook-journalism

On Tuesday morning, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) unveiled a comprehensive plan to protect journalism, including revamped antitrust action against Facebook and Google and new collective bargaining powers for media companies. But Sanders also calls for a more ambitious idea that has been floating around left-wing policy circles all year: a tax on targeted advertising that would funnel money directly from tech giants to local newsrooms.

“We should consider taxing targeted ads and using the revenue to fund nonprofit civic-minded media,” Sanders said in an op-ed in the Columbia Journalism Review. “We must also explore new ways to empower media organizations to collectively bargain with these tech monopolies.”

Free Press, which first laid out the idea of a targeted advertising tax in February, applauded the announcement. “While companies like Google and Facebook dominate online advertising, too little money from all those clicks goes to support news production,” Free Press CEO Craig Aaron said in a statement. “It’s time for Silicon Valley giants to contribute their fair share and our proposed tax is the best way to collect.”

The idea of a targeted advertising tax has drawn support from unexpected corners, even outside the context of journalism. In May, Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Romer made the case for a targeted ad tax as an alternative to conventional regulation, saying a progressively oriented tax — in which rates increase with the scale of the targeting — could encourage companies to explore alternatives like ad-free subscriptions. “Under this model, consumers know what they give up,” Romer wrote, “and the success of the business would not hinge on tracking customers with ever more sophisticated surveillance techniques.”

polarbear4

bravo. Lots of those clicks are talking about the news.

polarbear4

polarbear4

polarbear4

jcitybone

https://thehill.com/hilltv/rising/458951-sanders-yangs-universal-basic-income-proposal-not-a-solution-to-impact-of-automation

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) says there’s “no question” that automation and artificial intelligence will have a fundamental impact on working families but he doesn’t think fellow candidate Andrew Yang’s proposal of a universal basic income is necessarily the solution.

“This is an issue that is of enormous consequences for working people,” Sanders told Hill.TV in response to the future impact of automation. “It is an issue that gotten nowhere near the kind of discussion that it needs.”

But in response to Yang’s proposed universal basic income Sanders emphasized that “people want to work” and the desire to “be a productive member of society” is a “very deeply ingrained feeling that people have.”

“The challenge that we face is how do we use technology to improve the lives of working people,” Sanders said. “So if you have a really terrible job, a boring job and we make your job better and we enable you to work 20 hours a week rather than 40 hours a week, it’s not a bad thing…but it means to say you still need an income to live by, we can’t cut your salaries in half.”

Sanders went on to tout his federal jobs guarantee as a more viable alternative.

polarbear4

could use both right now
love Bernie, though, for not pandering to yang gang

jcitybone

https://www.jacobinmag.com/2019/08/at-will-employment-just-cause-law-bernie-sanders-workplace-democracy-plan

In the opening speech of his 2020 presidential campaign, Bernie Sanders noted that he “did not come from a family of privilege that prepared [him] to entertain people on television by telling workers: ‘You’re fired.’” Like most Americans, Sanders said, he “came from a family who knew all too well the frightening power [that] employers can have over everyday workers.” In his “Workplace Democracy Plan,” released last week, Sanders outlined how he would rein in that “frightening power.”

Most of the coverage of the plan has focused on its calls for a sectoral bargaining system, among other sweeping changes. Much less has been written about the plan’s promise to end “at-will” employment through a national “just cause” law.

If enacted, “just cause” would reshape the American workplace, requiring bosses to have a justifiable reason for firing an employee. The added protections could embolden workers, finally giving them the due process rights on the job that they expect in the political sphere. But the details will matter — and that’s why it’s important to compare “just cause” and “at will” in the United States to social-democratic countries.

Sometimes when union organizers are talking to workers, they ask them to imagine how outraged people would be if our political institutions were as unfree as our workplaces. It’s hard to find a more outrageous example than the US system of at-will employment. While some progress has been made in limiting the boss’s absolute power, right now nothing but the whim of an employer stands between millions of workers and unimaginable economic pain.

Sanders’s Workplace Democracy Plan hopes to change that.

The challenge of transitioning from our at-will system to a standardized system of employment protections is a daunting one. It’s unclear whether Sanders would try to accommodate the legal exceptions that are already in place, or try to overhaul the American labor relations system all at once.

Whichever path Sanders chooses, it’s important to remember that policies aren’t shaped by politicians and their staff in isolation — they’re molded by social coalitions. If Sanders found himself in a position to enact his agenda, he couldn’t rely on the praise that some labor leaders have offered for the Workplace Democracy Plan. The organizing and advocacy of the labor movement must be the building blocks of Sanders’s political revolution.

Tyrannocaster

Sad news for us here today.

Laura
Laura

So sorry for your loss. What a handsome boy he was. Hold the memories tight.

jcitybone

😢 You’re right about breaking hearts, but worth it. I’m sure he was a lucky dog to spend his golden years with you.

Tyrannocaster

Hmm, didn’t realize this would also include the one I already posted. I don’t fully understand how Twitter does things yet.

polarbear4

gorgeous

polarbear4

i’m so so sorry.

orlbucfan

Was he a Tervuren (sp?)? What a gorgeous boy and a rescue? Unusual. Still, 12.5 y.o. is a good lifespan for these big breeds. I lost Toto at 8–too young for a Dobe, and I am not 100% recovered. Another pup is in my future when the time is right. Losing them hurts real bad, and it doesn’t get easier with familiarity. Man, do I know. 🙁 Thoughts of peace to you and your family, Tyr.

jcitybone

Aint Supposed to Die A Natural Death
Aint Supposed to Die A Natural Death

This country is in deep doo doo. I hope he can fight it.

jcitybone

This poll shows Bernie rising not Warren. Bernie’s also closer to Biden than he is to Warren. Biden leads Trump by 8. Bernie leads by 4. Warren and Harris are tied. Trump beats Buttigieg by 2. Buttigieg continues his free fall down all the way to 3, behind Yang at 4 and tied with Tulsi.

https://emersonpolling.reportablenews.com/pr/august-national-poll-sanders-closing-gap-with-biden-mayor-pete-fades

In the latest Emerson national poll, former VP Joe Biden continues to lead the Democratic primary at 31%, similar to the numbers found in both of Emerson’s July national polls. Sen. Bernie Sanders gained some ground from the previous poll, with his numbers up for the second time in a row from 20% to 24%. Sen. Elizabeth Warren holds at 15% and Sen. Kamala Harris is at 10%. No other candidate clears 4%.

There continues to be a large age divide in the democratic primary with Sanders receiving 36% support of those under the age of 50 compared to 11% support among those 50 and over. Biden, on the other hand, has the support of 21% of those under 50 and 44% of those 50 and over. Warren’s support is more consistent as she is at 14% with voters under 50 and 17% with voters 50 and over. And Harris is at 8% among under 50 year olds and 12% among those 50 and up.

Sanders’ support also disproportionately comes from those making less than $100,000 a year as he has the support of 38% of voters whose household income is under $50,000 a year and 22% support of those who make between $50,000 and $100,000 a year. Sanders receives just 6% support of those who make over $100,000 a year. Biden and Warren’s support is much more evenly spread out between the income brackets.

Democratic primary voters appear to be locking in their choices, with 50% saying they will definitely vote for the candidate they’ve chosen at this time, up from 41% who were decided in early July. Biden and Sanders have the most loyal supporters, with 63% and 62% of their supporters indicating they are sticking with their candidate. Additionally, 45% of Warren supporters and 39% of Harris supporters say they will stick with their choice.

jcitybone
orlbucfan

I guess Liz is the newest flavor over there. So sad. Voted.

jcitybone

DK’s membership is older, richer and whiter. Warren’s posse!

polarbear4

don’t forget more hillbotty

WindDancer13

This may be a new resource for some on climate change issues.

My suggestion: When talking to people who are squeamish about climate change, try another tactic. Talk to them about water and air pollution and eroding soils. This is something they can plainly see and is not far off in the future when none of us will be around. It is here and now.

jcitybone

https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/political-commentary/john-hickenlooper-climate-change-opposition-green-new-deal-876602/

The Democratic Party endorsing a former Democratic governor in a Senate race may not sound like a headline. Still, it’s one of those “Why do they have to be such dicks?” moves that leads progressives to think the Party is thumbing the scale against them.

If there is such a thing as an anti-climate Democrat, it’s John Hickenlooper, no matter what the DSCC says about voting for him to “act on climate.” West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin may have raised eyebrows by backing Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw from the Paris Accords, but Manchin never bragged about drinking a glass of Hallibutron fracking fluid, as Hickenlooper once did. Hickenlooper’s devotional act remains part of the reason he’s known by the nickname “Frackenlooper.”

As governor, he threatened to sue towns that restricted fracking enterprises, and followed through more than once. He led a fight against a ballot measure allowing communities to restrict fracking development.

The endorsement of Hickenlooper would have made sense under back when politicians who took gobs of industry money could believably market themselves as moderates or centrists. Today, voters see corporate donations as competition. They don’t want to share political leaders with oil and gas companies, or health insurance companies, or weapons contractors.

By deciding to publicly back Hickenlooper, who has a history of lavish support from energy companies, the Democratic Party is making a statement about what side of the corporate donation argument it backs. It seems determined to sink or swim with its Hickenloopers and Joe Manchins, continuing to push the unconvincing line that hackery is synonymous with electability.

WindDancer13

Given the CBC’s stated goals and its composition of former black leaders in the Civil Rights fight, one has to question their silent acquiescence to the 1994 Crime Bill and what has followed from it. Denying that some black leaders have become part of the elitist establishment does no one a service, least of all those they say they support.

The article that she refers to is this one and deserves a full read:

Congressional Black Caucus Institute Takes CoreCivic Cash, Boosts Policies That Help Private Prisons

“Companies like CoreCivic are amongst the most committed entities in opposition to transforming our criminal justice system,” Scott Roberts, Senior Director of Criminal Justice Campaigns at racial justice organization Color of Change, told Sludge. “They are the most invested in maintaining the status quo that’s got us to being a country that is leading in the history of the world in incarcerating its own people.”

“It’s incredibly disappointing to know that any of the entities affiliated with the Congressional Black Caucus continue to take money from CoreCivic or any other private prison company, so there’s just no excuse for it,” Roberts said. “It’s unacceptable.”

Question: If the general election comes down to Bernie vs Trump, will the CBC remain silent?

WindDancer13

Cognitive Dissonance: Maxwell feels free to say this while the MSM entity she says it on and all the rest of MSM have many, many articles and videos dismissing the plans and proposals that Bernie has released to the media.

orlbucfan

She looks like she stuck her finger in a light socket and forgot to pull it out. What A ditz!

polarbear4

spiffed up.

polarbear4

he gets it.

polarbear4

And it’s looking more and more like she gets it, too

polarbear4

Krystal: Are you [an existential threat]?
Bernie: In some ways, I am….

polarbear4

killing us softly

polarbear4


might be a dupe but worth it

polarbear4

goodness

jcitybone

That restaurant owner turns out to be a wealthy supporter of Harris who has donated thousands to her

https://www.sfgate.com/beer/article/Bernie-Sanders-poses-with-Anchor-Brewing-Union-14382232.php

Less than six months after Anchor Brewing employees officially unionized in San Francisco, workers celebrated by posing with pro-labor presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders.

“I spoke to him about his labor plan, which had been released I think the day before,” said Belden, who was in the photograph. “It was just a really brief conversation — the one that I had with him — (but) I’m very much into his workplace democracy plan. And I told him how much it would help other people in a position that we’ve been in trying to organize at our workplace.”

Unlike a report from a San Francisco restaurant owner who claimed Sanders was cranky and rude to staffers, Belden said the candidate was “the most animated” he’d ever seen.

“I’ve actually seen him speak before City College,” Belden continued. “But … this was a conversation, like a back-and-forth in a question and answer session. And I was really, really impressed with how genuinely dedicated he seemed to hear about the ILWU members and officials with concerns about stuff like automation, and indigenous sovereignty. And he was really — he was cool. He seemed really interested.”

4C9C3147-78A7-4B1F-BD43-084ED029D61D.jpeg
Skip to toolbar