Skip to toolbar
 
HomeUncategorized9.19 Open Thread

82
Leave a Reply

avatar
Photo and Image Files
 
 
 
Audio and Video Files
 
 
 
Other File Types
 
 
 
45 Comment threads
37 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
8 Comment authors
wi62Aint Supposed to Die A Natural DeathhumphreyBennyOzoneTom Recent comment authors

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
polarbear4
polarbear4

thank you, orl! 🎉🐿🌧

polarbear4
polarbear4


🧵

polarbear4
polarbear4

polarbear4
polarbear4

or, as Michael Singer says of every moment, it took 13.8 billion years to get here, it’s got nothing to do with you. 💗

jcitybone

OzoneTom
OzoneTom

A turtle doesn’t change it’s stripes.

Aint Supposed to Die A Natural Death
Aint Supposed to Die A Natural Death

Well Mitch McTurtle certainly is changing his.

jcitybone

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/ginsburgs-death-crystallizes-the-choice-in-november-as-no-other-issue-can/2020/09/19/aeb63cd6-fa7d-11ea-be57-d00bb9bc632d_story.html?utm_source=reddit.com

Ginsburg’s death changes the calculus for the campaign between President Trump and former vice president Joe Biden. The court long has been a voting issue for some conservatives, particularly evangelical Christians and others who put opposition to abortion at the top of their issue list. Trump will be counting on the prospect of expanding a conservative majority on the Supreme Court to further energize that part of his base.

But the possibility of a conservative majority of long-standing on the high court is just as likely to have an impact on opponents of Trump. The history of the abortion debate suggests that when the right to an abortion is truly threatened, proponents of that right suddenly become hyperactive. Given Ginsburg’s status and the role she played in empowering women and fighting for women’s rights, her loss will add octane to the fuel on the left.

Depending on the outcome of the election and of the resolution of who fills the Ginsburg seat, the battle could easily expand to an even more charged debate over whether the high court speaks for and represents the views of a majority of Americans or even whether the democratic system of government more broadly has become undemocratic.

Twice in the past five elections, the popular vote winner has lost the presidential election. It could happen again in November, as Trump is likely to lose the popular vote as he did in 2016. Senate Republicans control the upper chamber, but their members represent fewer than half the nation’s population. Republicans in the House have routinely won more seats than their share of the vote, thanks to the makeup of congressional districts.

This is not an issue that is suddenly upon the country. Two years ago, the Economist magazine ran a cover story with the headline, “American democracy’s built-in bias,” which highlighted the consequences of a nation with an expanding urban-rural split as wide as it is now in the United States layered on top of the constitutional system crafted upon compromise between big-state and small-state interests.

Noting that “a red vote counts more than a blue one” in America, the magazine’s editorial argued, “This bias is a dangerous new twist in the tribalism and political dysfunction that is poisoning politics in Washington.”

OzoneTom
OzoneTom

There was always a certainty that the next president would be in a position to fill at least one vacancy on the high court.

That being said, the timing of Justice Ginsburg’s death introduces a new dynamic into the election. It will be difficult to anticipate all of the ways this could play out before and after election day.

jcitybone

jcitybone

No surprise that Lady G is a lying hypocrite

polarbear4
polarbear4

OzoneTom
OzoneTom

Joe Biden, 1992:

Here’s how it works. For 17 years, I was chairman or ranking member of Senate Judiciary Committee, which overseas nominations to the Court. I presided over nine total nominations—more than anyone alive. Some I supported. Others I didn’t. But every nominee was greeted by committee members. Every nominee got a committee hearing. Every nominee got out of the committee to the Senate floor, even when a nominee did not receive majority support in my committee. And every nominee, including Justice Kennedy—in an election year—got an up or down vote by the Senate. Not much of the time. Not most of the time. Every single time. That’s the Constitution’s clear rule of Advice and Consent. And that’s the rule being violated today by Senate Republicans. Nobody is suggesting that Senators have to vote “yes” on a nominee. Voting “no” is always an option. But saying nothing, seeing nothing, reading nothing, hearing nothing, and deciding in advance simply to turn your backs—is not an option the Constitution leaves open.

OzoneTom
OzoneTom

How are they going to get out of the debates?

jcitybone

Well it’s not like his opponent is any great shakes either as shown by his terrible town hall performance last week. I’m sure the debates will be train wrecks that won’t change minds.

humphrey

No doubt that Trump will issue a steady stream of lies energizing his rabid base. On the otherhand I am uncertain as to how Biden will perform.🤔

polarbear4
polarbear4

All Trump has left are his hard-core.

humphrey

It is not an insignificant number. It is comprised of fascists, racists, evengelicals, right to lifers and many of the wealthy.

Aint Supposed to Die A Natural Death
Aint Supposed to Die A Natural Death

Lol. Well if they can’t use a teleprompter, perhaps they could get one of those boxes that W had under his jacket on his back when he debated Gore in 2000. Lolol… tRump will make minced meat out of ByeDone.

jcitybone

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/19/upshot/supreme-court-polls.html

In 2016 and 2018, many analysts concluded that Supreme Court politics helped Republicans by helping to energize or consolidate conservative voters.

True or not, it certainly wasn’t obvious ahead of time which side would benefit from a court vacancy, and the same can be said today, in the aftermath of the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. There’s no way to know exactly what will unfold, but a closer look at recent polls, including new New York Times/Siena College surveys, does provide reason to think that Joseph R. Biden Jr. might have as much — or more — upside on the issue than President Trump.

In Times/Siena polls of Maine, North Carolina and Arizona released Friday, voters preferred Mr. Biden to select the next Supreme Court justice by 12 percentage points, 53 percent to 41 percent. In each of the three states, Mr. Biden led by just a slightly wider margin on choosing the next justice than he did over all.

Similarly, a Fox News poll last week found that voters nationwide trusted Mr. Biden over Mr. Trump — by seven points — to nominate the next Supreme Court justice. Here again, Mr. Biden led by a slightly wider margin on this issue than he led Mr. Trump.

A closer look at the results suggests there might be some upside for Mr. Biden among persuadable and low-turnout voters. Voters who either weren’t backing a major-party candidate or who said they could still change their mind said they thought Mr. Biden would be better at choosing the next justice by an 18-point margin, 49 percent to 31 percent. And voters who said they weren’t “almost certain” or “very likely” to vote said they thought the same by an even larger 52-23 margin.

Benny

Benny

humphrey

I just checked out numerous accounts of Republicans for Biden.

As to the results……. bupkus.😮

They may hate Trump but they still have republican values!

polarbear4
polarbear4

yup. it’s true, Biden will win because the Republican values of TPTB will carry him. They are tired of trump’s recklessness.

humphrey

polarbear4
polarbear4