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magsview

Thank you orlbucfan!

I very much enjoyed the Farm Aid, thank you Benney! Listened to it in bits, as I was able, will listen to more later while parboiling/freezing a bean harvest.

Posting here for convenience.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hrNb_dLQYtU&feature=emb_logo

polarbear4
polarbear4

ty💫

magsview

Sorry for spelling your name wrong Benny, that was pre-breakfast, low blood sugar 😉

wi62

I played a lot of it while doing the usual household stuff, better that having the Tube on. Anyway a trip down memory lane with the various artists and some good stuff I haven’t heard before. I hope that some of the money goes towards suicide out reach programs as farmer suicide has hit hard in WI due to farmers losing everything. the only way to survive is for family farms to form collective farms so they can compete with the cooperate mega farms. When the foreclosures come the corcraps come in buy up everything -land equipment for pennies on the dollar and form mega farms. Farmers that are going under have had their farms since they came to the US and passed it through the generations but no more. You pretty much have to join a collective group to be competitive with the corcrap owned ones. Another industry being destroyed like wal mart did to the ma and pa stores.

magsview

It’s so sad and awful!

I saw this today:

This Is How We Pry The Corporate Stranglehold Off Of Our Farm System

The lines have been drawn between Big Ag and the rest of us. While our food system’s chaos poses a wicked problem, there is some good news. At the end of 2019, Senator

Cory Booker introduced the Farm System Reform Act. Since then, Senators Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Bernie Sanders (I-VT) have co-sponsored the legislation. It’s fitting that these three lead the fight in the Senate; they spent much of their time on the campaign trail getting to know community members and farmers in Iowa and people across the country living with the bleak realities of our current food system.

In a recent letter to Congress, nearly 300 diverse groups called for the swift passage of the groundbreaking bill, which proposes banning factory farms and includes a series of key reforms to rein in corporate power and build a food system that works better for regular people. Hundreds of thousands of people across the country have written or called their elected officials and urged them to co-sponsor this legislation.

Any hope of passing? The original source below was on Sept 9, 2020:

“The Farm System Reform Act will ensure that huge corporations no longer have a stranglehold on our food supply,” said Representative Ro Khanna. “It’s important for our farmers, the economy, the environment, and animal welfare. I’m proud to see the growing coalition of groups organizing to support the bill.”

“The provisions of this bill, including the $100 billion voluntary buyout program for contract farmers who want to transition away from industrial animal agriculture, would protect watersheds around the country,” said Waterkeeper Alliance Executive Director Marc Yaggi. “That’s one of the reasons more than 50 Waterkeeper groups in the U.S. endorsed this bill. It will provide real — and necessary — improvements to waterways that have been impacted by pathogens, excess nutrients, and harmful algal blooms for far too long.”

The sign-on letter calls for passage of the Farm System Reform Act and a ban on factory farms in order to benefit independent farms, rural communities, food safety, our air and water, and the welfare of animals. It is signed by over 250 organizations including those mentioned above and Family Farm Defenders, Food Chain Workers Alliance, HEAL (Health, Environment, Agriculture, Labor) Food Alliance, Contract Poultry Growers Association of the Virginias, Friends of Family Farmers, Pennsylvania Farmers Union, Indiana Farmers Union, and Women, Food and Agriculture Network (WFAN).

https://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/news/300-diverse-advocacy-groups-endorse-farm-system-reform-act-and-urge-quick-passage-congress

polarbear4
polarbear4

😾😢🤬

polarbear4
polarbear4

i hope everyone knows i was saying i am mad and sad about the larger picture. i guess using the cat mad face was sort of facile, considering how tragic it is. i have long been anti-big ag and even big corpses, like pepsi. indian farmers had high suicide after Pepsi basically pulled a monsanto in india may have had something to do with water, too. i Hate this. Bernie would have changed it.

i dearly hope the bill passes.

polarbear4
polarbear4

magsview

I don’t think I’m being watched as I WFH but, as I use both my work computer and my home computer to do work, it would probably be difficult to watch my keystrokes very effectively. I don’t think they’d be able to see what I’m doing on my home computer? (I access my main email account and the accounting software via online using my home computer whereas, on my work computer, I’m mainlined in – that’s the computer I log into zoom meetings on).

It’s a bit of a conundrum, because I also manage two young men remotely, one of whom I’ve come to trust to be more or less working while being ‘on the clock’, the other one not so much.

The one I trust fails me when he doesn’t always let me know when he’s finished with the tasks I give him (we’re working on that) so I have to check up on him occasionally, not a huge problem, but the other guy just goes quiet on me and is evasive. I have to spend quite a bit of energy keeping him engaged on Fuze (the chatting software we use, a kind of skype). That’s the kid I had to ask to put away his phone (I finally got the courage) when he was working with me in the office last week. He’s addicted to his phone. He protested, saying, “I just use it as a calculator”, which is bullcrap because he’s checked his texts while I’ve been standing right there.

Here’s a calculator, put your phone away please. Thank you.

polarbear4
polarbear4

good for you 🌸

magsview

Thank you for the support!

I came around the corner of his cube wall about a half hour later (I wear soft shoes, lol) and he guiltily tried to hide his phone sitting there right out in the open-I ignored it as it’s clear he has a total addiction. I hadn’t actually even noticed his phone on the desk (and not put away) but the way his hand flew over to his right to try to cover the phone, the second he saw me, totally gave him away.

But the next time we work together in the office (maybe this Wed) I will give it another go, and I’ll do my best to be good-humored about it.

polarbear4
polarbear4

sometimes wish i had my machine still
https://memex.craphound.com/2009/10/09/junky-styling-a-manual-for-thrift-shop-clothes-remixers/

short book review about a couple of women in London who create awesome clothes from thrift shop remixes and give instructions in their book.

polarbear4
polarbear4

i guess they are no longer in business.
cory talks about using a tailor for the same purpose.

magsview

I can only imagine having my own tailor!! (or seamstress)
That would be amazing.

One thing I would really love is custom-made shoes. A girl can dream.

polarbear4
polarbear4

yeah. cory must be selling a lot of books! lol.

magsview

Hahaha, must admit that I was thinking along similar lines!
“once you find a tailor you love”, lol,
I’m lucky to afford a new t-shirt and leggings. 😀

wi62

The Mrs has a friend in her hometown whom is an awesome seamstress, re purposes wedding dresses into confirmation ,prom thing of that nature..

magsview

Well, I hear that the Pope isn’t a fan of Trump. What a shocker.

Me questioning Barrett:

‘Of course everyone is free to practice their faith as they see fit, but can you promise that your faith will not be placed above the laws of the United States?’

In a 2006 Notre Dame Law School commencement speech, Barrett encouraged the graduating class to engage in prayer before accepting any new job and said, “If you can keep in mind that your fundamental purpose in life is not to be a lawyer, but to know, love, and serve God, you truly will be a different kind of lawyer.” She also referenced in the speech a comment the university’s president made to the graduating class earlier in the ceremony: You will always keep in mind that your legal career is but a means to an end, and as Father Jenkins told you this morning, that end is building the kingdom of God.

These hearings threaten to expose those who desire to put the bible ahead of the Constitution. I suspect that we’ll have to listen to idiots claiming that the U.S. is a Christian country.

Speaking to Newsweek about Amy Coney Barrett’s involvement with People of Praise, constitutional scholar Ilya Shapiro said that “it’s not appropriate to cast aspersions on nominees because they’re religious.”

It’s fair game to ask whether and how someone’s religious views might affect a nominee’s jurisprudence—the Democrats did this poorly at Barrett’s Seventh Circuit confirmation hearing”

https://twitter.com/MichaelSalamone/status/1310009998433452033

Benny

magsview

This made me finally, and fully, understand why he and Ann Coulter are friends.

wi62

Trumpcorps base is comprised of two parts, the delusional nut jobs and the R no matter what crowed –those are blinded by party loyalty but not nutjobs

magsview

humphrey

🤔👇👇👇

wi62

If Byedone can stay cognizant thru the debates it could be very very ugly for Trumpcorp especially with a large turnout

humphrey

Once again its Joe Manchin doing what he does!

https://thehill.com/homenews/senate/518479-manchin-opposes-adding-justices-to-the-court

Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.V.) said Sunday he would not support adding justices to the Supreme Court or doing away with the filibuster if Democrats win a Senate majority and the White House.

Manchin, who represents a state easily won by President Trump in 2016, argued that the Senate must continue to work in a bipartisan way.

“I’m not going to vote for anything that would cause, basically, not be able to work in a bipartisan way,” Manchin, likely the most conservative Democrat in the Senate, said on CNN’s “State of the Union,” when asked about expanding the court.

“That is not something that I would support. I can’t support that,” he added. “The whole premise of this Senate and this democracy experiment of ours is certain decency and social order that basically has been expected from us and especially from the Senate … now all of the sudden they’re going to say, ‘Oh you don’t have to talk anymore, you just have to have 51 votes and forget about the minority,’ well the minority has always played an important part in the Senate’s proceedings.

He continues to serve as a valuable cog for the dems.

humphrey

This is why the DSCC supports candidates like Amy McGrath and John Hickenlooper as they don’t want any progressives to ruin their game plan.

wi62

‘Oh you don’t have to talk anymore, you just have to have 51 votes and forget about the minority,’That’s how the Rs play it well the minority has always played an important part in the Senate’s proceedings. Tell what part the minority Dems have played under the turtles senate

Bold Wi

Benny

Sleepy Joe’s getting worked up about the new SCOTUS nominee. /s

This is live, BTW.

Benny

Recap:

He pleaded with Senate GOP not to hold the confirmation hearing until after the election, America people should choose.

Biden clearly is against the nominee because the vote at this time would overturn any lawsuits to dismantle ACA (and pre-existing conditions).

He chose not to attack the nominee, but attack about the ACA issue.

A crappy law.

Benny

jcitybone

Does Krystal actually think the Republicans are not going to confirm if the Dems go nuclear on Barrett? It really is all about positioning for the election. The Republicans have the votes for confirmation and they will confirm no matter what the Dems do.

Benny

But it doesn’t mean they shouldn’t probe deeply.

Benny

jcitybone

https://www.politico.com/news/2020/09/27/democrats-supreme-court-confirmation-421849

Senate Democrats can’t stop Mitch McConnell from confirming a new Supreme Court justice, but they are already planning to make it as painful as possible.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) has his caucus on board with an effort to disrupt and obstruct Senate Republicans, using a wide range of procedural tools to try to make it difficult for the Senate majority leader.

Interviews with more than a dozen Democratic senators revealed broad support for disrupting the Supreme Court confirmation process, even if the strategy yields some collateral damage. Yet Democrats facing tough reelections and those who typically spurn delay tactics overwhelmingly support the hardball campaign, potentially putting them at increased risk of losing their seats.
“We know that the votes are not there [to block the nominee], but you do what you can to call attention to it,” said Sen. Doug Jones (D-Ala.), the most vulnerable Democratic incumbent who could be pulled off the campaign trail as a result. “The issue is that this is a power grab.”

“We can’t do business as usual in a situation that’s so extraordinary where the Republicans are breaking their word to rush a nominee so they can kill the Affordable Care Act,” added Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.). “We can’t just say, oh, yeah, that’s normal. Sorry.”

The goal, senators and aides say, is to highlight what Democrats see as hypocrisy and a blatant abuse of power on the part of McConnell (R-Ky.), who blocked President Barack Obama’s Supreme Court nominee in 2016 but is pressing forward with the goal of confirming President Donald Trump’s pick, Amy Coney Barrett, before Election Day. McConnell only needs a simple majority after Republicans eliminated the filibuster for Supreme Court nominees in 2017. And if Democrats can prevent Barrett from being seated on the court before Nov. 10, she likely wouldn’t be able to rule on the Trump administration’s effort to invalidate Obamacare.

Democratic senators were quick to justify the retaliation effort, which is only getting started with less than 40 days until the Nov. 3 election.

“Process is everything,” said Sen. Bob Menendez (D-N.J.). “So if you’re going to use the process to try to steal an election, then we’re going to use the process to try to do everything for that not to happen.”

Some Democrats have already said they will refuse to meet with Barrett, just as many Republicans snubbed Obama’s 2016 pick, Merrick Garland. But the party still plans to abide by some norms; Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee have decided to attend the confirmation hearings, despite calls from the left for a boycott.

Indeed, McConnell has told his members that they should be prepared for such tactics from Democrats, which could complicate campaign schedules for vulnerable GOP incumbents.

Even Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.), who voted to confirmed Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh and is considered the most conservative Senate Democrat, is on board with Schumer’s initial effort. He was quick to justify Schumer’s use of the two-hour rule, which halted committee business last Tuesday.

“Hell, we don’t do anything around here anyway, we’ve got plenty of time to do meetings,” Manchin said. “They can reschedule.”

Moderate Democratic Sen. Jon Tester of Montana said he doesn’t plan to “second-guess” Schumer, in part because he views the alternative as the destruction of the Senate.

“I don’t know that the Senate will ever be what it once was. Mike Mansfield would be shaking his head today,” Tester said in an interview, referring to the longest-serving Senate majority leader. “There’s no sense of fair play, it’s all about power, it’s all about retention of power, it’s all about screwing people over.”

Other Democrats said the disrupt-and-obstruct strategy could prove useful as the party seeks to further highlight the Senate’s inaction on pandemic relief, which has stalled for weeks after negotiations broke down.

“We’re in the middle of a recession and a pandemic, and apparently he’s going to move heaven and earth to ram through a partisan nominee for the court, but there’s no time for us to resolve that?” Sen. Chris Coons (D-Del.), a Judiciary Committee member, said in an interview.

Benny

Schumer is a DNC patsy.

polarbear4
polarbear4

Do you know if they really thought for the people, they wouldn’t lose their seat, so again, I’m done with this.

polarbear4
polarbear4

fought, but i guess thought works, too.

wi62

Pelousy’s quiver

tumblr_1441a3f1501fff381ef2e81cb27dc1a2_64d02992_500.gif
humphrey

You can always count on the dems to come armed with a pillow when there is a knife fight.

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcSjmDVNrXpL7p1zRLCdGy1P1CSTc6eJGdHYtw&usqp=CAU

polarbear4
polarbear4

There goes my stomach again. If they can’t oppose someone like her they are truly lost to me. This is just ridiculous.

wi62

So Joe you had repeatedly said that you could work across the aisle with the GOP, so hows it going so far? Doesn’t look good for you as far as the USSC goes, can you remember how it went with Garland?

jcitybone

https://www.commondreams.org/news/2020/09/27/truly-horrifying-pick-fury-over-trump-nomination-amy-coney-barrett-scotus

“President Trump and Senate Republicans have badly mismanaged a deadly pandemic for months. Now, in the midst of an unprecedented public health crisis, they are willing to ram through a Supreme Court nominee—within days—who will vote to destroy the Affordable Care Act, kick millions of Americans off their healthcare, and eliminate protections for millions more who have preexisting conditions,” said Sanders.

“This is an absolute outrage,” he said.

jcitybone

Some good pre-debate polling numbers for Biden from several A+ pollsters.

National ABC/Post. Biden +10. 54-44
National Siena/Times. Biden +8. 49-41
Michigan Marist. Biden +8. 52-44
Wisconsin Marist. Biden +10. 54-44

magsview

I see there’s an uptick of covid cases in Wisconsin lately – please stay safe wi62!

humphrey

That is for sure.

There are too many maga supporters.
comment image

wi62

A major one, just set as record for positive’s yesterday(well over 2k). Hospital beds are starting to fill up, Evers extended the mask order but the Rs are prepping to fight it with their best weapon the WSSC which does what the R’s tell them too basically. That’s my same fear for the USSC as well.

Stats as of Saturday
The number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 continues to climb in Wisconsin as the state health department reported another single-day record of new cases on Saturday.
Saturday’s 2,817 positive cases made up 22.4% of the 12,584 test results reported by the Wisconsin Department of Health Services. The average number of new daily cases over the last seven days was higher than ever Saturday at 2,012.
The previous record for most new COVID-19 cases reported in a single day was 2,533 on Sept. 18.
The state health department also reported Saturday that seven more people have died.

More than 1.5 million Wisconsinites have been tested for the virus since the pandemic began. Of the 113,645 who have tested positive:
94,094, or 82.8%, are considered “recovered” by DHS, meaning either there is documented proof their symptoms have resolved or it’s been 30 days since their diagnosis.
18,252, or 16.1%, are considered “active,” meaning they aren’t “recovered” and haven’t died.
1,281, or 1.1%, have died.
At least 7,041, or 6.2% of all people who have tested positive for COVID-19, have been hospitalized, although DHS doesn’t know in about a third of confirmed COVID-19 cases whether the infected person was ever admitted to a hospital.

As of Friday afternoon, 543 people with COVID-19 were hospitalized and 147 of them were in intensive care, according to DHS. An additional 194 hospital patients were awaiting the results of a COVID-19 test.

wi62

Just thought I would add the stats for my home county
Ages 0 to 9, 59 cases, nine new since Sept. 18
Ages 10 to 19, 189 cases, 31 new
Ages 20 to 29, 422 cases, 66 new
Ages 30 to 39, 298 cases, 41 new
Ages 40 to 49, 249 cases, 43 new
Ages 50 to 59, 326 cases, 59 new
Ages 60 to 69, 238 cases, 33 new
Ages 70 to 79, 119 cases, 14 new
Ages 80 to 89, 49 cases, five new
Ages 90 to 99, 4 cases, one new

Benny

How often do you have to take a COVID test? I take one about every 2-3 weeks now since my employer requires one each time I may have to enter the building and have to have 24 hour clearance. Each time, I’ve been negative, knock on wood.

wi62

I will be getting my 3rd one next week

polarbear4
polarbear4

damn. so many in intensive care.

polarbear4
polarbear4

same in my county. highest danger since it started.

and yes, wi, please stay safe. ❣️

wi62

Same to all TPW land, The dopes that say this will go away on Nov 4th will have to come up with a new excuse to ignore it

magsview

Oh no!

Stay well polarbear.

jcitybone

Definitely, a mess with progressives in SF.

https://theintercept.com/2020/09/25/shahid-buttar-dsa-san-francisco-allegations/

A FIERCE DEBATE over the congressional campaign of Shahid Buttar is roiling San Francisco’s Bay Area progressive circles, dividing clubs and leftist organizations along increasingly hardened lines. A fight that began with unsupported accusations of sexual harassment, as well as claims of misogyny and sexism, has shifted to a debate over how voters and activist groups ought to consider accusations of the mistreatment of staff by a boss under fire from former aides.

The battle broke into the open in July, when two types of allegations combined to turn the longshot bid of Buttar, an activist and attorney who is challenging House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, into a left-wing Rorschach test. The claims were unrelated, but were put forward together as part of the same case being made by critics of Buttar. The first was an allegation of sexual harassment in the early aughts by a former acquaintance, Elizabeth Croydon. The allegation remains uncorroborated, her credibility called into serious question. That allegation gave fuel to the second, unrelated charge that Buttar mistreated his staff, particularly the women. He has fiercely defended himself, denying the accusations and suggesting that they were racist and politically motivated, reflect a hostility to his campaigning strategy, and were the product of a smear campaign by his former staffers.

The allegations led to a string of Buttar’s former supporters backing away from him and spurred a broader conversation about the internal dynamics of the progressive movement. Buttar’s defenders warn that ending his campaign on the basis of staff complaints hands a weapon to the establishment that will be wielded relentlessly against insurgent candidates and movements, while his critics say that the movement can’t be successful unless it is led with integrity and respect.

The saga has left the Buttar campaign in ruins, but it has also left progressives with vexing questions about how to handle allegations against a candidate during the heat of a campaign when every day matters, while also respecting the right of victims to come forward and be heard. Campaigns are only likely to see more such situations in years ahead, some based on legitimate and damning claims of misconduct, some in a gray area, and some fabricated and boosted for political gain. In August, former staff to Massachusetts congressional candidate Ihssane Leckey alleged staff mistreatment and successfully persuaded the Boston Democratic Socialists of America to unendorse. Before they could do so, Leckey rejected the group’s endorsement, accusing the group of trafficking in sexist and anti-immigrant tropes. Around the same time, College Democrats in Massachusetts accused candidate Alex Morse of misconduct, charges that were later revealed to have been cooked up as part of a scheme to curry favor with incumbent Rep. Richie Neal. For nearly a week, however, the charges were treated publicly as legitimate and left a mark on Morse’s campaign. None of it is symmetrical: When Tara Reade alleged that Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden had sexually assaulted her while she worked in his Senate office, many Biden supporters, or opponents of President Donald Trump, dismissed the allegation out of hand. Others showed restraint, delaying judgment until more information was available. And with Trump, there is credible-allegation fatigue: Just recently, Trump was credibly accused of sexual assault, an allegation met with a national yawn.

The debate over Buttar’s campaign was prompted by a draft resolution circulated by the San Francisco chapter of the DSA, or DSA SF, in late July, moving to rescind the chapter’s endorsement and calling on Buttar to participate in a restorative justice process within the chapter, of which he and several of his current and former staffers were members. The draft resolution accused Buttar of “a pattern of abuse including but not limited to sexual inappropriate behavior with his staff and volunteers.” The effort was covered in the San Francisco Chronicle, Mission Local, and later, The Intercept, which reported on claims of misogyny and sexism from a number of Buttar’s former staff and contractors. The DSA SF draft resolution led to other local political groups also reconsidering their endorsements of the candidate, a process that has fractured San Francisco’s leftist circles, according to several people who spoke to The Intercept. Attacks online and in private meetings have driven those on both sides to take caution with what they say publicly about the campaign for fear of alienating longtime friends and colleagues.

The Buttar saga has left progressives with vexing questions about how to handle allegations against a candidate during the heat of a campaign, while also respecting the right of victims to come forward and be heard.
DSA SF ultimately passed a resolution in a virtual meeting on August 4 that stripped out the accusations regarding Buttar’s mistreatment of staff and the alleged sexual misconduct. The amended resolution said simply that DSA SF had ”lost confidence in the management” of Buttar’s campaign “and in Shahid Buttar as a candidate that represents our values.”

Brandon Harami, chair of the group Berniecrats — which Buttar said is the only group that gave him a fair hearing and ultimately voted to downgrade its endorsement to a recommendation — said the allegations of staff mistreatment were not necessarily new. “I had known that he had a tendency to yell, and berate, and insult his staff since 2019, because I knew people that were on staff. They had asked me then at that time to not say anything because they weren’t comfortable coming forward with it, and they really wanted to beat Pelosi,” he said, adding that, in the end, “I just didn’t feel comfortable maintaining an endorsement of him when so many of his staff went out of their way to challenge it.”

But that doesn’t mean Harami is happy with how it all unfolded. “All this sucks. I hate it,” said Harami, who was part of a 2018 effort to get the state Democratic Party to repeal its endorsement of Pelosi. “I’m also wondering if it’s really the hill that the left needs to die on?”

polarbear4
polarbear4

no kidding. Nancy abuses people on a very large scale, and I’d be willing to wager she’s not always gentle with her staff. This whole thing was just awful.

jcitybone

Obviously the ACA is no M4A, but eliminating it during a pandemic would be a disaster.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/27/health/obamacare-supreme-court-barrett-ginsburg.html

Even if Democrats have little chance of blocking Judge Barrett’s confirmation, they are hoping to reignite the public passion to protect the law that helped Democrats recapture the House in 2018, a year after Republicans in Congress came close to repealing it. This time, party leaders are quick to point out, the election is coming amid a pandemic that has left many Americans requiring expensive medical care, including for potentially long-term health problems that insurers could refuse to cover if the law and its protections with people for pre-existing conditions were repealed.

“That was the issue that drove the 2018 campaign so substantially — it came right after a very, very clear threat,” said Chris Jennings, a longtime Democratic strategist on health care who is advising Joseph R. Biden’s campaign. “This time, the fear of a takeaway was not as great. But now it’s re-engaged and credible.”

The number of uninsured people in the United States decreased by 20 million from 2010 to 2016, as the A.C.A. went into effect. Its major provisions include allowing states to expand Medicaid to cover more low-income adults, setting up insurance markets where individuals earning less than about $51,000 a year can get subsidies to help pay their premiums and barring insurers from placing annual or lifetime limits on how much care they would cover. But 42 percent of Americans still view it unfavorably, according to one recent poll, likely including many middle-class families who earn too much for the law’s financial assistance and find the high level of coverage it requires unaffordable.

Mr. Trump, attempting to neutralize the threat to his campaign posed by the pre-existing conditions issue — one that affects as many as 133 million Americans — signed an executive order on Thursday declaring it is the policy of the United States for people with pre-existing health conditions to be protected. But he offered no details on how he planned to assure that while also seeking to invalidate the A.C.A. His own Justice Department filed a brief in June asking the Supreme Court to overturn the entire law, including its pre-existing conditions protections.

OzoneTom
OzoneTom

I could see a court majority blocking a total dismantling of the ACA.

The reason that the GOP has had trouble with “repeal and replace” is that, at it’s heart, Obamacare is a Conservative plan. The plan is very similar to the plan that Gov. Mitt Romney implemented in Massachusetts and which used the framework developed by The Heritage Foundation conservative think-tank.

Instead of “bending the cost curve down,” Obamacare has not stopped a rise in health care costs. Costs rise as do premiums. Actual health services continue to become more expensive to the patient and they are paying ever-more for less health care. Available plans in most areas are dropping with many counties having only one or two providers to choose from.

The plan was always intended to funnel greater and greater amounts of consumer and government funds to the for-profit health insurance industry donors. And it is enormously successful at doing that.

Dependence on Medicaid has soared and many physicians and hospitals will not accept it, and when they do the denial rates are very high.

And still tens of thousands of Americans are uninsured — probably way more when the figures are updated for pandemic-related job losses. And those who are able to scrape together enough to afford premiums still face tough hurdles when it comes to increasing deductibles and co-pays.

Obamacare does not provide for collective negotiation of drug prices or allow patients to purchase plans across state lines. After all, such competition would imperil health industry profits.

So that is why I believe that the the court will find a way to keep Obamacare in operation. If they don’t then the possibility of some sort of Medicare-for-All becomes a much stronger possibility and that is something to be very much avoided for their entire class.

polarbear4
polarbear4

change my mind about the power in the world around me and the power in the world around me will change.

speak up. act.

and my favorite

💗{{{{ tender power }}}}💗

takeaways from marianne today

magsview

I totally applaud her positive energy and inspirational efforts.

Thank you for doing your part to make the world a better place polarbear!

polarbear4
polarbear4

need mucho practice. ty☺️

polarbear4
polarbear4

wut.

magsview

lol, here’s from the comments:

polarbear4
polarbear4

at first i thought they were robots!