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magsview

Tip Jar for Orl!

Thanks for the thread.

magsview

I’m ‘watching’ the Assange hearing via twitter. Kevin Gosztola has been really good, I’m surprised he got access, lots of other people were blocked:

magsview

humphrey

humphrey

magsview

I’m surely no legal expert, but I don’t understand how the prosecution was able to add a fresh indictment so late in the game.

magsview

I wonder what her chances are of beating Ted Wheeler (current Portland mayor).

humphrey

comment image?resize=807×807

humphrey

jcitybone

Some Labor Day stuff

https://progressive.org/dispatches/labor-day-black-lives-matter-wallace-gobern-200906/

Every Labor Day, we celebrate the incredible contributions of the labor movement and working people to our nation’s progress. This year, with 13.6 million workers currently unemployed and around one million new people applying for unemployment benefits each week, many working families have little to celebrate.

While many Black workers have been deemed essential, our country continues to treat them like they’re disposable—even as a national racial justice movement has declared that Black lives matter.
Millions of “essential” workers also get little or no paid sick leave or health coverage and consequently must choose between their health and their livelihoods. Indeed, the COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare the ways our current economy fails to meet the everyday needs of working people.

Black workers have been hardest hit by both the pandemic and its economic fallout. They are disproportionately more likely to lose their jobs as a result of the pandemic. And Black workers who are still working are more likely to be employed in low-wage essential service jobs, and are therefore more likely to face greater exposure to the virus than other groups.

Though they make up about one in nine workers overall, Black workers comprise about one in six of all front-line industry workers, according to a recent report by the Economic Policy Institute. They are disproportionately represented in employment at grocery stores, public transit, warehouses, and child care.

This shows that, while many Black workers have been deemed essential, our country continues to treat them like they’re disposable—even as a national racial justice movement has declared that Black lives matter.

polarbear4
polarbear4

shameful how we’ve treated frontline workers. probably no good way to even track the deaths.

jcitybone

https://inthesetimes.com/article/threat-of-dissent-julia-rose-kraut-review-communism

On Sep­tem­ber 8, 1947, fed­er­al agents walked into the mid­town Man­hat­tan office of the Hotel, Restau­rant & Club Employ­ees & Bar­tenders Union Local 6 and arrest­ed its pres­i­dent for being an ​“unde­sir­able alien.” Michael J. Ober­meier had been orga­niz­ing hotel work­ers into a suc­ces­sion of scrap­py inde­pen­dent unions since he arrived in New York as a Ger­man immi­grant around the time of the first World War. By the time of his arrest, he led 27,000 union mem­bers in a pow­er­ful affil­i­ate of the Amer­i­can Fed­er­a­tion of Labor.

That same day, attor­neys for the CIO’s Trans­port Work­ers Union Local 100 were fight­ing an aggres­sive move to deport John San­to, the union’s Roman­ian-born orga­niz­ing direc­tor. Local press asked the Deputy Com­mis­sion­er of Immi­gra­tion and Nat­u­ral­iza­tion, Thomas Shoe­mak­er, if these actions were a part of a crack­down. Shoemaker’s mild response was that the legal actions were ​“in the nor­mal order of busi­ness.”

The truth is that they were both. The fed­er­al gov­ern­ment was crack­ing down on union lead­ers it believed to be Com­mu­nists, and it was specif­i­cal­ly tar­get­ing activists based upon their immi­gra­tion sta­tus. Dozens of arrests, pros­e­cu­tions and depor­ta­tion pro­ce­dures were ini­ti­at­ed against alleged Com­mu­nist activists in the weeks and months that fol­lowed. It’s a pat­tern that has marked Amer­i­can pol­i­tics for over a cen­tu­ry.

A new book by lawyer and his­to­ri­an Julia Rose Kraut, Threat of Dis­sent: A His­to­ry of Ide­o­log­i­cal Exclu­sion and Depor­ta­tion in the Unit­ed States, com­pre­hen­sive­ly lays out this long his­to­ry of using the denial — and even the threat­ened removal — of cit­i­zen­ship in order to restrict some forms of polit­i­cal action.

Indeed, that exec­u­tive dis­cre­tion is at the heart of Pres­i­dent Trump’s so-called ​“Mus­lim Ban.” While obvi­ous­ly racist in his inten­tions, his exec­u­tive order drew its author­i­ty from Red Scare-era ide­o­log­i­cal exclu­sion laws and the flim­sy argu­ment that vis­i­tors from major­i­ty-Mus­lim nations are pre­dis­posed towards ter­ror­ism. Now con­sid­er Trump’s recent efforts to declare the loose net­work of antifas­cist orga­niz­ers a ​“domes­tic ter­ror­ist orga­ni­za­tion.” He wants to tap into the sur­veil­lance and civ­il for­fei­ture pow­ers afford­ed him under the PATRI­OT Act (which Democ­rats vot­ed to renew dur­ing Trump’s term). Just wait until Stephen Miller tells him he can also deport antifas­cists who aren’t nat­ur­al-born cit­i­zens!

If Joe Biden is able to defeat Trump in Novem­ber, pro­gres­sives should treat his pres­i­den­cy with the same lev­el of fear and loathing as we did the Trump and Bush admin­is­tra­tions. The basic demo­c­ra­t­ic rights of cit­i­zen­ship should not be the play­things of pres­i­dents. When we are final­ly able to turn our atten­tion towards shut­ting down Stephen Miller’s tod­dler con­cen­tra­tion camps and estab­lish­ing a ​“path­way to legal cit­i­zen­ship,” we also have to insist upon irrev­o­ca­ble cit­i­zen­ship as a right.

jcitybone

https://www.politico.com/news/2020/09/07/income-inequality-wealth-gap-409234

The path toward economic recovery in the U.S. has become sharply divided, with wealthier Americans earning and saving at record levels while the poorest struggle to pay their bills and put food on the table.

The result is a splintered economic picture characterized by high highs — the stock market has hit record levels — and incongruous low lows: Nearly 30 million Americans are receiving unemployment benefits, and the jobless rate stands at 8.4 percent. And that dichotomy, economists fear, could obscure the need for an additional economic stimulus that most say is sorely needed.

The trend is on track to exacerbate dramatic wealth and income gaps in the U.S., where divides are already wider than any other nation in the G-7, a group of major developed countries. Spiraling inequality can also contribute to political and financial instability, fuel social unrest and extend any economic recession.

The growing divide could also have damaging implications for President Donald Trump’s reelection bid. Economic downturns historically have been harmful if not fatal for incumbent presidents, and Trump’s base of working-class, blue-collar voters in the Midwest are among the demographics hurting the most. The White House has worked to highlight a rapid economic recovery as a primary reason to reelect the president, but his support on the issue is slipping: Nearly 3 in 5 people say the economy is on the wrong track, a recent Reuters/Ipsos poll found.

jcitybone

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/07/opinion/trump-economy-jobs.htmlH

One important thing to bear in mind about official monthly job statistics is that they’re based on surveys conducted during the second week of the month. That’s why I used scare quotes around “August”: What Friday’s report actually gave us was a snapshot of the state of the labor market around Aug. 12.

This may be important. Private data suggest a slowdown in job growth since late July. So the next employment report, which will be based on data collected this week — and will also be the last report before the election — will probably (not certainly) be weaker than the last.

In any case, that August report wasn’t great considering the context. In normal times a gain of 1.4 million jobs would be impressive, even if some of those jobs were a temporary blip associated with the census. But we’re still more than 11 million jobs down from where we were in February.

And the situation remains dire for the hardest-hit workers. The pandemic slump disproportionately hit workers in the leisure and hospitality sector — think restaurants — and employment in that sector is still down around 25 percent, while the unemployment rate for workers in the industry is still over 20 percent, more than four times what it was a year ago.

In part because of where the slump was concentrated, the unemployed tend to be Americans who were earning low wages even before the slump. And one disturbing fact about the August report was that average wages rose. No, that’s not a misprint: If the low-wage workers hit worst by the slump were being rehired, we’d expect average wages to fall, as they did during the snapback of May and June. Rising average wages at this point are a sign that those who really need jobs aren’t getting them.

jcitybone

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/07/nyregion/wealth-tax-budget-billionaires.html

For years, progressive Democrats in Albany have been pushing a three-word solution to many of New York’s problems: Tax the rich.

Yet year after year, proposals to make the wealthy pay more were blocked by Republicans.

Now, however, their most staunch opponent may well be the state’s third-term governor, Andrew M. Cuomo, a socially progressive Democrat who often boasts of his history of tax cuts.

That approach appeals to most taxpayers, and is easier to understand during a decade of financial growth. But as the coronavirus pandemic has transformed New York’s financial problems from merely troubling to catastrophic, a growing contingent of Democrats in the all-blue Legislature is pushing the governor to reconsider his stance.

They say the state must increase taxes on the wealthy to safeguard services for New York’s neediest, which could be decimated if the state were forced to make broad cuts because of the looming deficit.

Raising taxes on the wealthy has long had the backing of the Assembly and its speaker, Carl E. Heastie, and it recently gained the endorsement of the Senate majority leader, Andrea Stewart-Cousins, bestowing the effort renewed political momentum.

In late July, Ms. Stewart-Cousins cited the coronavirus crisis in throwing her support behind taxing “multimillionaires and billionaires to help our state shoulder this extraordinary burden.”

Her statement was an encouraging sign for the left-wing activists, unions and more than 100 Democratic lawmakers who have indicated they support raising taxes on the wealthy to lessen the blow of budget cuts.

“At some point, the waiting game with Washington will run its course,” said Michael N. Gianaris, a state senator from Queens and the deputy majority leader. “And I think we’re just about there.”

humphrey

Trump Postmaster Louis DeJoy Made Illegal Straw Donations to GOP Candidates

humphrey

humphrey

humphrey

đŸ€”đŸ˜źđŸ‘‡

humphrey

😂😂😂

magsview

Lol

If I’m not burying my head working, I’m drinking cheap wine trying to avoid MSM these days. Saw Kamala on some show this morning, sounding like she was about to cry..I lunged for the clicker, almost spilling some of my eggs.

polarbear4
polarbear4

😂😂😂

polarbear4
polarbear4

LMFAO

jcitybone

https://www.democracynow.org/2020/9/7/cornel_west_ben_jealous_on_whether

In a Democracy Now! special, Harvard professor Cornel West and Ben Jealous, president of People for the American Way and former president of the NAACP, discuss the 2020 DNC, Joe Biden’s vow to fight systemic racism and “overcome this season of darkness in America,” the historic nomination of Kamala Harris as his partner on the ticket, and how the convention was a showcase for a broad anti-Trump coalition, including prominent Republican figures given plum speaking slots, but few voices from the party’s insurgent left wing. “At this moment, with the decline and fall of the American empire, it looks as if the system is unable to generate enough energy to seriously reform itself. It remains sanitized, superficial,” says Dr. West. “I want fundamental change.” Jealous says Biden is someone progressives can work with and pressure. “The theme of this convention was really one of unity,” he notes. “This is a time when we have to come together to defeat a president who is the most evil, the most corrupt that any of us have seen.” We originally interviewed West and Jealous last month as the DNC ended.