• It’s starting to warm back up, had our first major snow fall this week 9 plus inches.

  • http://inthesetimes.com/article/22094/join-rank-and-file-teachers-strikes-unions-labor-movement-strategy

    Only workers themselves have the power to transform society, and workers must organize themselves to do so. Union staff and elected leadership can play important and sometimes pivotal roles, but in the fight against capital to win substantive,…

    [Read more]

  • https://labornotes.org/strikes

    After a long absence, the strike seems to be making a comeback in the U.S. The teacher strike wave of 2018-19 caught everyone off guard—but showed that workers’ most powerful tool can still win. As we finished this pamphlet, 49,000 GM workers were on the picket lines and 32,000 Chicago Teachers and school emp…

    [Read more]

  • http://inthesetimes.com/working/entry/22172/strike-mcdonalds-detroit-fast-food-rashida-tlaib

    On Tuesday, over 1,000 people gathered for a strike action at a McDonald’s locations on Detroit’s East Side. The workers, who were fighting for basic workplace dignity, a fair wage and a union, showed that they’re ready to raise hell in the face of inj…

    [Read more]

  • http://www.ibew.org/media-center/Articles/19Daily/1911/191104_TheIBEW

    This summer, IBEW leaders asked for your urgent help. Our apprenticeships were under attack, threatened by a nonunion contractor-backed Labor Department rule that would allow them to operate second-rate training programs and present them as equal to our own.

    Apprentices,…

    [Read more]

  • http://www.ibew.org/media-center/Articles/19Daily/1911/191112_National-SAVE

    Every November the Department of Labor holds National Apprenticeship Week to raise the profile of certified training programs that provide a path to the middle class for working people.

    This year it’s the week of Nov. 11, and, if this were a normal year, the Labor D…

    [Read more]

  • Old and new labor news

    • http://www.ibew.org/media-center/Articles/19Daily/1911/191112_National-SAVE

      Every November the Department of Labor holds National Apprenticeship Week to raise the profile of certified training programs that provide a path to the middle class for working people.

      This year it’s the week of Nov. 11, and, if this were a normal year, the Labor Department would be holding events across the country that showcase the businesses, labor unions and educational institutions that have certified construction apprenticeships. Nearly 65 percent of all civilian registered apprentices are trained in the construction industry, and of those construction apprentices, 75 percent are trained through the building trades privately funded joint-labor network.

      “Everybody wins under the current system, and it’s worth celebrating,” said International President Lonnie R. Stephenson. “Our members get a debt-free education that immediately puts them to work in their own communities building the infrastructure needed for all of us to thrive. Construction businesses get a highly trained and motivated workforce with the skills to do the work today and grow as the industry changes. The public gets the safest, highest quality buildings, bridges and roads from a highly productive workforce.”

      But today organized labor unions across the country are uniting to save construction apprenticeships from a cynical proposal from the Department of Labor. The rule under consideration would gut these apprenticeships and turn them into little more than the kind of low paid, no future internships that are all too common in the white-collar world.

      “We are calling it National Save Apprenticeship Week,” said Political and Legislative Department Director Austin Keyser.

    • http://www.ibew.org/media-center/Articles/19Daily/1911/191104_TheIBEW

      This summer, IBEW leaders asked for your urgent help. Our apprenticeships were under attack, threatened by a nonunion contractor-backed Labor Department rule that would allow them to operate second-rate training programs and present them as equal to our own.

      Apprentices, like the ones here at Washington, D.C., Local 26’s training center, learn the skills that will prepare them for a long career in the electrical trade. More than 65,000 IBEW members spoke out to the Labor Department in defense of high-quality apprenticeships earlier this year.
      More than 65,000 of you, joined by another quarter-million of your union brothers and sisters in other trades, responded by speaking up in defense of the top-quality training you received through the IBEW.

      “We don’t yet know how the Labor Department will decide this issue, but I can tell you one thing for certain,” said International President Lonnie R. Stephenson. “IBEW members step up when their livelihoods are under attack, and I couldn’t be more grateful for everyone who took the time to speak out in defense of our apprenticeship training and the quality tradesmen and tradeswomen it turns out each and every year.”

      The deadline for submitting public comments to the DOL passed in late August, and a month later the department had processed and posted just under 200,000 of the 325,000 submissions it received.

      More than 95% of the comments were from union members urging the administration to exempt the construction industry from its apprenticeship rule. Union leaders hope the overwhelming response will be enough to persuade government regulators.

      In addition to their public comments, thousands of members filled out the IBEW’s own survey about their apprenticeships. Those were also compiled and sent to the Labor Department.

    • http://inthesetimes.com/working/entry/22172/strike-mcdonalds-detroit-fast-food-rashida-tlaib

      On Tuesday, over 1,000 people gathered for a strike action at a McDonald’s locations on Detroit’s East Side. The workers, who were fighting for basic workplace dignity, a fair wage and a union, showed that they’re ready to raise hell in the face of injustice by standing together.

      That’s how Patricia Moseley, who has worked for McDonald’s for 34 years, describes her experience of solidarity during the strike. “We always get each other’s backs,” Moseley says. “When I see people out here, doing the same thing I’m doing, it makes me feel like ‘Hey, everybody can do this.’ Come and join us. You ain’t gotta be scared.”

      Ignited by the hideously common experience of workplace sexual harassment, the strike was a powerful display of working-class force in an industry where women and people of color make up the overwhelming majority of non-managerial workers.

      “This is huge,” Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.), who attended the strike, said in a statement to In These Times. “Fast food workers…stood up against corporate greed to demand human dignity in the workplace. These corporations cannot operate without the workers, who deserve to make a living that allows them to provide for themselves and their family. They deserve workplaces free of sexual harassment and violence.”

      According to a new class-action lawsuit, McDonald’s is drenched in a “culture of sexual harassment.” And as NPR reports, “more than 50 claims and charges of harassment of female employees are pending against McDonald’s.” But the issue stretches far beyond the golden arches: The industry as a whole is awash with harassment and abuse. A 2016 poll found that “40 percent of women in the fast food industry have experienced unwanted sexual behaviors on the job.”

    • https://labornotes.org/strikes

      After a long absence, the strike seems to be making a comeback in the U.S. The teacher strike wave of 2018-19 caught everyone off guard—but showed that workers’ most powerful tool can still win. As we finished this pamphlet, 49,000 GM workers were on the picket lines and 32,000 Chicago Teachers and school employees were about to walk out.

      We decided to put together this special expanded issue of Labor Notes—a manual on how to strike. We’re betting that’s info that more and more unions are going to need in the near future.

    • http://inthesetimes.com/article/22094/join-rank-and-file-teachers-strikes-unions-labor-movement-strategy

      Only workers themselves have the power to transform society, and workers must organize themselves to do so. Union staff and elected leadership can play important and sometimes pivotal roles, but in the fight against capital to win substantive, lasting gains, workers must be in the driver’s seat.

      When workers are sidelined, at best we get staff-driven mobilizing, which Jane McAlevey describes as “dedicated activists who show up over and over … but [lack] the full mass of their coworkers or community behind them.” With an organized rank-and-file base, by contrast, ordinary workers themselves are the change agents, deeply involved in developing an analysis of what’s wrong in the workplace and a strategy for how to fight the boss (and, ultimately, capitalism). Their power comes from building majorities large enough to leverage militant action. Wins are less likely to be rolled back when a majority puts its own sweat into the process and stands ready to defend its gains.

      The widespread teachers’ strikes of 2018 and 2019 and the Chicago Teachers Union strike of 2012 illuminate the potential power of worker-led organizing, as they were primarily led and initiated by rank-and-file union members.

    • Seems like a wasted endorsement because Harris is going nowhere fast. I guess Harris has ties to this mostly California based union

      https://www.sfchronicle.com/politics/article/Exclusive-Kamala-Harris-picks-up-major-union-14839354.php

      California Sen. Kamala Harris is getting the presidential endorsement of the United Farm Workers, the labor group will announce Saturday.

      The major endorsement, shared first with The Chronicle, is timed with the California Democratic Party Endorsing Convention in Long Beach, and comes as a shot in the arm as the Democrat’s campaign has struggled in recent months.

      The powerhouse California-based farm workers labor group has a long history in progressive politics. Established by liberal organizing icons Cesar Chavez, Dolores Huerta and Gilbert Padilla, the union represents more than 10,000 agricultural workers in California and along the West Coast. The union also has a strong political grassroots presence in the Southwest.

    • https://www.latimes.com/politics/story/2019-11-16/bernie-sanders-heads-to-east-l-a-for-a-rally-as-part-of-his-outreach-to-young-latinos

      Juvenal “Juve” Quintana was never really into politics until he learned about Bernie Sanders’ first presidential campaign.

      In 2016, Quintana heard the Vermont senator’s talk of providing everyone with health insurance and thought that would help Latinos in his hometown of Modesto, but he didn’t think they were getting the message from Spanish-language media. So Quintana, the lead singer of Grupo La Meta, wrote a ballad: “El Quemazón,” or “The Bern.”

      “He’s the man with a vision to better this country,” the corrido begins, in Spanish. “Bernie Sanders is his name. Now you’re going to feel his burn.” Quintana’s song has had hundreds of thousands of views since then, and the message still stands, he said in an interview.

      “Bernie’s talking about the same exact things that I wrote about in 2016,” said Quintana, 30. “I’m 100% for Bernie. I feel like he’s the candidate who will listen.”

      Young Latinos like Quintana were strong supporters of Sanders in 2016, and the candidate is reaching out to them again in hopes they can help him capture primaries nationwide, and particularly California’s March 3 Democratic contest. Sanders is headed to predominantly Latino East L.A. on Saturday for a rally at Woodrow Wilson Senior High School, and thousands are expected to attend.

      The Sanders campaign debuted its first California office in East L.A. and opened another in the Central Valley, an area overlooked in past campaigns but where Democratic candidates this year are looking to capitalize on increasing diversity. Sanders had planned tours at colleges in Fresno and Bakersfield, but had to cancel after he suffered a heart attack; he stopped in Fresno on Friday. Outreach to Latinos has been integrated into the campaign since the start, for instance in the form of senior Latino staff and bilingual ads, said Chuck Rocha, a senior advisor with the campaign.

      “There’s lots of Latinos in California, there’s lots of working-class young people, and working-class voters and lots of folks who have a history of standing up against power,” said Rocha. “Bernie Sanders is their candidate, and all we have to do is give them the tools to be reminded of when to vote and where he stands on the issues and they will show up.”

    • This is what so many critics miss about Bernie. It’s not all about what’s in his proposals; much of what he aims to do is shift everything as far as possible to the left.

      https://grist.org/article/what-critics-of-bernie-sanders-climate-plan-are-missing/

      Obviously, experts and pundits can and should criticize a policy proposal on its merits. But what Sanders’ critics miss is that even if it’s impractical or unfeasible, his Green New Deal still serves a political purpose. The plan moves the Overton window, the range of political ideas that the public considers acceptable or mainstream, several notches to the left.

      In fact, Sanders has already moved the Overton window on climate. In 2016, Sander’s climate strategy centered around a carbon tax, an idea that his rival, Hilary Clinton, couldn’t even get behind. In 2019, a carbon tax is barely on the menu, not because it’s too ambitious, but because it’s not ambitious enough. The extraordinary evolution of our climate discourse over the past couple of years is, in part, thanks to the groundwork Sanders laid in 2016. (It’s also thanks to Green New Deal champion Ocasio-Cortez, who credits Sanders for inspiring her to run for Congress.)

      Sanders has long been adept at shifting the Overton Window. In 2016, Clinton called talk of a single-payer system “a theoretical debate about some better idea that will never, ever come to pass.” Now, more than half of the crowded Democratic field supports some version of it. That’s in large part because Sanders started beating the Medicare-for-All drum on a national stage during his 2016 presidential run. Sanders has also influenced the national conversation around immigration, publicly funded higher education, and, yes, capitalism itself.

      His $16 trillion climate plan may not be entirely feasible, but pulling his most serious competitors further left has always been well within Sanders’ grasp. At the end of the day, that may be the most indelible mark Sanders leaves on the 2020 race.

      • he does inspire!

        Hoping that his “indelible mark” is 8 years of turning this country and the world around.

    • Actually a very complimentary CNN article.

      https://edition.cnn.com/2019/11/16/politics/bernie-sanders-social-justice/index.html

      Earlier this week, Bernie Sanders wrote an article for the magazine Jewish Currents under the headline “How to Fight Antisemitism.” It is, in a word, powerful — not only because it movingly melds the personal with the political as it charts the scourge of antisemitic violence, but also because it lays bare the subtler workings of oppression.

      “I am a proud Jewish American. My father emigrated from Poland to the United States in 1921 at the age of 17 to escape the poverty and widespread antisemitism of his home country,” Sanders writes. “Those in his family who remained in Poland after Hitler came to power were murdered by the Nazis. I know very well where white supremacist politics leads, and what can happen when people do not speak up against it.”

      As with much of the Vermont senator’s rhetoric, “How to Fight Antisemitism” is stirring in part because of its unsparing language: murderer, twisted, nefarious, vicious, hate. Via prose that’s pointed rather than soft — shorn of politesse that can be misleading in its fuzziness — Sanders confronts bigotry with an ethic that tends to elude the political moment: honesty.

      But the article is perhaps more notable for something else: its nuanced grappling with America’s antagonisms and how one form of hatred finds easy accomplices in other forms.

    • Importance of institutions to hold values

      The first two days of the impeachment hearings was a strong reminder of the importance of the State Department and how the Trump administration has harmed the agency and the people.

      The role of the state department is to carry out foreign policy and along the way, to practice diplomacy. There has been too little diplomacy for many years, but going forward, when Gaia dominates global politics, diplomacy will be essential.

      The Trump administrations has also harmed many other institutions.

      When I was young, Science was a transcendent institution. Separate from politics. Generating facts about the Real World through studies of an deanimated Nature. Science had too much power, but now under attack, it has too little power.

    • Flood after vote of Venice, Italy, city council that climate change is not an emergency

      ‘Mother Nature Does a Mic Drop’: Venice City Council Chamber Floods Minutes After Members Vote Down Climate Crisis Amendment
      “From the ‘you can’t make this stuff up’ department.”

      and Bruno’s tweet today

      • When I started watching, I had to fiddle with the sound and missed the critical part that the question had been about Warren when asked about support of Palestinian rights, and she went off on other stuff as Tim Black noted. But I watched the entire clip without knowing the question that set it off and had to check if Tim was pulling a fast one by just showing the clip after the question. He wasn’t. He did say that the question that started this was Palestinian rights but I had to see it. It was there.

        Long comment but after watching the entire Amy Goodman interview and seeing other potential issues with her, I agree that she is not as forthright as Bernie. And as many others have pointed out, Foreign Policy is not her strong suit, her weak area.

        The point of the Tim Black piece is to show how Warren sidestepped the question, and if you expect that, it is probably not worth watching. But is important to know about these tricks and to keep an eye on her and to watch the media coverage which is playing every game in the book to ignore Bernie.

        • In the 2016 election I thought that Peter Daou was a complete jerk and thought that I would never pay attention to anything he said again.

          Well, it looks like he has come around.

    • I tried to find this on YouTube and I couldn’t. It is quite long and you might as well scrub in about 10 to 12 minutes at the beginning. The sound seems bad at first but it does improve.

      Arundhati Roy talks mostly about Kashmir and India, at this fate of the earth lecture. her spontaneous, funny self only comes through at the end, but it is a sobering look at this huge land. woven into her story is a tale of another right wing despot and fascist who knows how to win the people’s love. and how the media enables him. i must say i don’t understand if Tulsi really does support him. he cut off the internet, took money away. pretty amazing. but imho she goes on just a bit long. but who doesn’t love Arundhati.

      a very violent movement, as well.

      https://typemediacenter.org/schell2019/

    • “Speaking to a room filled with wealthy donors.” The people who matter to our former President.

      https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2019/11/obama-warns-democratic-presidential-candidates-not-to-move-too-far-left.amp

      Former President Barack Obama has taken pains to avoid commenting on the 2020 Democratic presidential contest, repeatedly saying he will support whoever comes out on top. But he seemed to shift gears a bit Friday night while speaking to a room filled with wealthy donors as he sent an apparent warning to presidential hopefuls to not move too far left. The American voter, as a general rule, isn’t really interested in extremes, the former president warned. “This is still a country that is less revolutionary than it is interested in improvement. They like seeing things improved. But the average American doesn’t think that we have to completely tear down the system and remake it,” Obama said. “And I think it’s important for us not to lose sight of that.”

      Obama obviously didn’t mention anyone by name but it seemed pretty clear that the two candidates that most fit the description are Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders. Plus it doesn’t seem to be a coincidence that he was speaking to a room filled with the kinds of wealthy Democratic donors who are most concerned about the rise of Warren and Sanders in the polls.

      “There are a lot of persuadable voters and there are a lot of Democrats out there who just want to see things make sense. They just don’t want to see crazy stuff. They want to see things a little more fair, they want to see things a little more just. And how we approach that I think will be important,” Obama said.

      The former president also criticized those who take their cues from “left-leaning Twitter feeds,” calling on candidates to pay attention to what goes on in the real world. “Even as we push the envelope and we are bold in our vision, we also have to be rooted in reality and the fact that voters, including the Democratic voters and certainly persuadable independents or even moderate Republicans, are not driven by the same views that are reflected on certain, you know, left-leaning Twitter feeds,” he said.

      Obama’s message wasn’t just filled with warnings. He also made a point of trying to calm nervous donors who may think that a competitive primary only benefits President Donald Trump’s bid for reelection.

    • https://www.politico.com/news/2019/11/15/dark-money-group-promotes-elizabeth-warren-071133?__twitter_impression=true

      A dark money group purchased an ad promoting Elizabeth Warren’s presidential campaign that ran in Iowa’s biggest paper this week — despite the candidate’s opposition to outside big money groups.

      The Des Moines Register ad on Wednesday was paid for by “Women.Vote,” a social welfare organization that does not have to reveal its donors. It boasted that “unlike most other candidates, Warren doesn’t take corporate or Super PAC money” and that “Warren will fight for everyday Iowans.” The Register did not immediately respond to a question whether the group had placed other ads previously.

      While Women.Vote does not have to disclose its funders, a longtime Warren donor submitted paperwork to form the group in the fall of 2018, according to filings with the California Secretary of State. The donor, wealthy Silicon Valley doctor Karla Jurvetson, donated over $5 million to Democratic causes in 2018. She also helped Warren’s campaign pay for access to the Democratic Party’s voter file earlier this year, as Buzzfeed News reported.

      Jurvetson and Women.Vote did not respond to requests for comment. Women.Vote did not appear to purchase any Facebook ads, according to Facebook’s ad archive. It’s unclear whether the group has run other ads in other newspapers.

      The Warren campaign said it did not know about the ad and asked for the people behind it to stop. Spokesperson Chris Hayden said that the “campaign was not aware of this and asks that those involved immediately stop purchasing advertisements of any kind. Elizabeth Warren believes democracy is undermined by anonymous, dark-money attempts to influence voters — whether that influence is meant to help or hurt her candidacy.”

    • I have a new rally thread up if you page hasnt updated for yet, you may want to refresh.

    • this person just had a friend tell her Warren is canceled. and she was for her. a prof, iirc.

  • It was Jim Hightower on the show

  • I was thinking of doing one, but not much in the way of labor news.

  • https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-features/bonnie-raitt-brandi-carlile-musicians-on-musicians-904591/

    CARLILE I still have my “No Nukes” guitar pick I picked off the ground at one of your shows. I remember my dad said, “What the hell, no nuclear power?” It was a radical statement.
    RAITT I was just basing it on role models I had, like Jo…

    [Read more]

  • https://truthout.org/articles/enbridge-throws-its-indigenous-peoples-policy-to-the-fire-over-pipeline/

    On October 8, White Earth tribal legal counsel and police issued a cease-and-desist order against Enbridge, a Canadian multinational energy transportation company, for conducting an illegal training within the borders of the White Earth…

    [Read more]

  • https://consortiumnews.com/2019/10/22/assange-displayed-signs-of-torture-in-courtroom-farce/

    By Craig Murray
    CraigMurray.org.uk

    I was deeply shaken while witnessing yesterday’s events in Westminster Magistrates Court. Every decision was railroaded through over the scarcely heard arguments and objections of Assange’s legal team, by a mag…

    [Read more]

  • https://consortiumnews.com/2019/10/22/editorial-dont-railroad-julian-assange-to-virginia/

    The WikiLeaks legal team have a strong case to have Assange’s extradition request thrown out after the government that wants him extradited got hold of surveillance video of his privileged attorney-client conversations.

    If this were a normal legal case, W…

    [Read more]

  • Bye the looks of it a lot more people need to look out https://radar.weather.gov/ridge/Conus/

  • I would consider that a badge of honor.

  • A email

    Before Bernie takes the debate stage on Tuesday, he’s hoping to hear directly from you about the issues you care about.

    Take 2 minutes to complete our latest survey.

    TAKE THE SURVEY

    On Tuesday night, Bernie will be joined by eleven other candidates at the fourth Democratic presidential primary debate.

    You’ll hear a lot of…

    [Read more]

  • The floor/ soap box is open.

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