• As always many thanks for your insights! Lowkeys music ability combined with his vast knowledge of history/politics and neoliberalisms impacts makes him a potent threat to the powers that be in the same way that AOC, etc are. I wouldnt be surprised to see them have a discussion at some point. i know he frequently retweets her.

  • This is video/song that got him blacklisted from msm and record labels and placed on watchlists which resulted in his harassment but as a result also how I was first introduced to his music:

  • a repeat from a ways back because I love it

  • Chevron spills 800,000 gallons of oil, water in California

    Officials began to clean up a massive oil spill Friday that dumped nearly 800,000 gallons of oil and water into a California canyon, making it larger — if less devastating — than the state’s last two major oil spills.

    The newly revealed spill has been flowing off and on since May and has…

    [Read more]

  • Why do billionaires keep presenting themselves as America’s great new hope?

    The past week saw both the passing of Ross Perot and the entry of Tom Steyer into the presidential race. It’s fitting that the two events should coincide – as one billionaire presidential candidate leaves us, another steps up to take his place. But while “rich guy who t…

    [Read more]

  • Rashida Tlaib Wants to Tax the Rich, Save Detroit, and Free Palestine

    In 2018, Rashida Tlaib was elected to Congress. Her election was extraordinary in many ways: she ran as a member of the Democratic Socialists of America; she became the first Palestinian-American in Congress; and she was part of a crop of left-wing challengers like Alexandria…

    [Read more]

  • Of course its framed as a military not being paid enough issue instead of a cost of living in general issue…

    The comments on this video show that people get it:

    It’s tragic ANY family should have to live this way. Not just military families.

    Yeah so are every other regular working families in america. Its…

    [Read more]

  • With ICE Raids Expected to Begin Sunday, Message From AOC, Bernie Sanders, and Others is Clear: ‘Know Your Rights’

    In advance of expected ICE raids Sunday that will target migrant families in at least 10 cities, politicians, celebrities, and activists are using their outsized voices to alert their audiences to their rights and protections under…

    [Read more]

  • Hip hop artist Lowkey and Victor Figueroa Clark, Alborada contributing editor and author of ‘Salvador Allende: Revolutionary Democrat’, discuss Salvador Allende’s socialist government in Chile and the lessons for the Left.

  • Tips, Comments, Complaints, Etc!

  • Good morning friends! Since yesterday’s thread is fairly full here is a new one! Have a great day!

    More news/videos/tweets/etc. in the comments.

    • Tips, Comments, Complaints, Etc!

    • Hip hop artist Lowkey and Victor Figueroa Clark, Alborada contributing editor and author of ‘Salvador Allende: Revolutionary Democrat’, discuss Salvador Allende’s socialist government in Chile and the lessons for the Left.

      • Well, LD, you’ve gone and done it again! You always post all these videos, they’re all worth watching, but now you’ve posted another great discussion, that partner and I have watched and then talked about enthusiastically. It’s now 2 hours later (where’d the morning go?), and we both want to say THANK YOU to you for providing this to us!

        If I can say one brief thing about the discussion in this video, many people have for a long time now been trying to figure out how to close the gap that separates a “social movement” from “political power.” This discussion mostly focusses on social movement, and the ideas on 1) community (“meat” space) as well as 2) taking control of the internet, are full of to-be-worked-out potential on how to bridge that gap. This is really interesting.

        I do think that both Bernie’s political / governmental philosophy and the incredible broad-scope achievements under way with the Bern app both show that this campaign is sensitive to the issues raised in the Lowkey discussion above, issues to which the campaign is developing new and innovative responses.

        It is truly international, truly (r)evolutionary, and I am thrilled!

        Hat tip also to others who post great videos here, too, and my thanks go to those TPWers as well!

        • As always many thanks for your insights! Lowkeys music ability combined with his vast knowledge of history/politics and neoliberalisms impacts makes him a potent threat to the powers that be in the same way that AOC, etc are. I wouldnt be surprised to see them have a discussion at some point. i know he frequently retweets her.

        • back atchya

      • Because in this video someone’s head is in the way of the translation, here is a video with Allende’s speech (make sure to turn closed captioning on):

    • With ICE Raids Expected to Begin Sunday, Message From AOC, Bernie Sanders, and Others is Clear: ‘Know Your Rights’

      In advance of expected ICE raids Sunday that will target migrant families in at least 10 cities, politicians, celebrities, and activists are using their outsized voices to alert their audiences to their rights and protections under the law.

      Among those using their platforms to help the victims of President Donald Trump’s war on immigrants is Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), who is using his large mailing list to “target a message to supporters that may be impacted by the upcoming enforcement raids by Immigration and Customs Enforcement,” as CNN’s Ryan Nobles reported Friday.

      Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), a fervent opponent of the Trump administration’s immigration policies, posted to her popular Twitter account about her three “2 Know Your Rights” events scheduled for Sunday.

      “Come volunteer TOMORROW 3-5:30pm as we help our neighbors keep safe in the threat of the President’s ICE raids,” Ocasio-Cortez tweeted.

    • Of course its framed as a military not being paid enough issue instead of a cost of living in general issue…

      The comments on this video show that people get it:

      It’s tragic ANY family should have to live this way. Not just military families.

      Yeah so are every other regular working families in america. Its unbelievable how hard it is to keep food in your homes.

      and trump gave $1,500,000,000,000 to the elite 400 americans

    • Rashida Tlaib Wants to Tax the Rich, Save Detroit, and Free Palestine

      In 2018, Rashida Tlaib was elected to Congress. Her election was extraordinary in many ways: she ran as a member of the Democratic Socialists of America; she became the first Palestinian-American in Congress; and she was part of a crop of left-wing challengers like Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Ilhan Omar whose victories shocked the Democratic establishment in Washington. And they’ve kept shocking them. Tlaib, along with Omar, has been the target of vicious attacks for her solidarity with the boycott, divestment, and sanctions movement (BDS) and criticism of the state of Israel. House Democrats have not only opposed Tlaib on these counts; they’ve allowed Republicans’ bigoted attacks on Tlaib and Omar over these issues to go unchallenged.

      Tlaib has also used her platform to not only support Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s Green New Deal, but to support the struggle for a Green New Deal specifically for Detroit. There, GM recently closed its Detroit-Poletown plant, part of a string of North American plant closures that will put fourteen-thousand people out of a job. In response, the Detroit Democratic Socialists of America has proposed “making Detroit the engine of a Green New Deal”: using the urgent need for ecological transition to create new jobs and support the victims of GM’s closures. Tlaib has vocally supported the proposal, leading rallies of hundreds of people in Detroit and tying it in to her other environmental proposals.

      Here, The Dig’s Daniel Denvir talks to Tlaib on June 3 about how growing up in Detroit has informed her politics, what economic justice in Detroit — and cities across the United States — would really look like, her advocacy for justice in Israel and Palestine, and the urgency of addressing dirty energy’s impact on working-class people. You can subscribe to The Dig and all the Jacobin podcasts at Jacobin Radio. The conversation has been edited for length and clarity.

    • Why do billionaires keep presenting themselves as America’s great new hope?

      The past week saw both the passing of Ross Perot and the entry of Tom Steyer into the presidential race. It’s fitting that the two events should coincide – as one billionaire presidential candidate leaves us, another steps up to take his place. But while “rich guy who tells it like it is” candidates are not necessarily doomed to electoral oblivion – one of them sits in the White House today – they represent everything dysfunctional about US democracy.

      Ross Perot was the original “outsider billionaire” candidate, gaining nearly 20% of the vote in the 1992 presidential election. It was not always clear what Perot stood for or what his policy plans were, though he was against Nafta and for balancing the budget. The Washington Post ran the headline “In Search of a Perot Platform”, and Perot himself would say cryptic things like “you could take any number of good plans that are around, implement them and have a gigantic improvement over the way things are.” Voters responded well to Perot. At one point, a poll showed him well ahead of both George HW Bush and Bill Clinton, and if it wasn’t for Perot’s bizarre temporary withdrawal from the race, he might have been a serious contender. Deficit-obsessed and mockable as he was, Perot had clearly tapped into something in the American electorate.

      But after Perot’s failure, it seemed as if his candidacy had been a quirky aberration in US politics. It was two more decades before we saw another “outsider billionaire” trying to gatecrash the party system, this time succeeding. Donald Trump in many ways made a similar pitch: his wealth made him independent and not beholden to establishment interests, he would shake things up in Washington. As Matt Taibbi observed, Trump “used the same tactics, if not exactly the same politics” as Perot to make it to the White House.

      Now we have hedge fund billionaire turned progressive political activist Tom Steyer, who also refers to himself as an “outsider” candidate. This is laughable. Steyer is as pure a product of the American ruling class as you can be. His father was an attorney at the prestigious Sullivan and Cromwell firm. Steyer himself attended Phillips Exter and Yale before joining Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs, where he was a protege of Robert Rubin. After making a fortune as a hedge fund manager, Steyer became one of the biggest donors in Democratic politics, financing campaigns and ballot initiatives around the country.

      In fact, Steyer has been the embodiment of the anti-democratic tendencies in the Democratic party, which has gone from being the “party of the people” to the “party of Wall Street”. Steyer’s brother agreed that the two of them could be the “Koch brothers of the left”, because of the sheer amount of money that Steyer has spent trying to further his agenda. The fact that there can be a Democratic party equivalent of the Koch brothers shows the problem. Some of Tom Steyer’s causes have been noble – he strongly campaigned against the Keystone XL pipeline for instance, even personally lobbying Barack Obama and enlisting other big donors to do the same. But having big donors personally push causes is exactly what democratic politics shouldn’t be.

    • Chevron spills 800,000 gallons of oil, water in California

      Officials began to clean up a massive oil spill Friday that dumped nearly 800,000 gallons of oil and water into a California canyon, making it larger — if less devastating — than the state’s last two major oil spills.

      The newly revealed spill has been flowing off and on since May and has again stopped, Chevron spokeswoman Veronica Flores-Paniagua said. She and California officials said the spill is not near any waterway and has not significantly affected wildlife. The last flow was Tuesday.

      Chevron reported that 794,000 gallons (about 3 million liters) of oil and water have leaked out of the ground where it uses steam injection to extract oil in the large Cymric Oil Field about 35 miles (56 kilometers) west of Bakersfield. The steam softens the thick crude so it can flow more readily and is a different process from fracking, which breaks up underground layers of rock.

      The state has issued Chevron a notice of violation ordering it to stop steam injections around the spill. The company also increased its production of oil from wells in the area. Both actions are intended to relieve underground pressure that may be forcing the mix of oil and water to the surface.

      Chevron will pay for the cleanup, though the state will oversee the process, said Steve Gonzalez, a spokesman for the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Office of Spill Prevention and Response.

      The cleanup and the investigation into what caused the oil flow were somewhat delayed as officials ensured there are no dangerous fumes or sinkholes that could trap workers or heavy equipment, he said.

      “At this point, they have it dammed off and they’re sucking it out, sucking the oil out,” Gonzalez said.

      Environmental groups said the Chevron spill is another sign of weakened regulations under an embattled California agency. Gov. Gavin Newsom this week fired the head of the state’s oil and gas division over a recent increase in hydraulic fracturing permits and amid a conflict-of-interest investigation of other division employees.

      • Our old friend from TOP, Dan Bacher, has been on fire on twitter lately. I gather that there has been a hire from the oil industry for a job much better suited to someone from more of a science background.

        He retweeted the following tweet on this particular story, though. (One of the reasons I like posting tweets is for the pictures, and this tweet is a good example. Now you can see the ‘canyon’ the article refers to, and is sure ain’t pretty!)

      • The video is even worse. And yesterday Pence tried to tweet that CNN was lying, and he was literally buried in response.

        • That’s just incredibly awful. Sounded like Pence was only concerned with containing them. The guard responds with talking about the “watchtowers” they use so that they can “pick anyone out who gets rowdy”. So disturbing.

    • LOL. DK’s Netroots Nation is being equated with the entire spectrum of progressive activists. Completely unsurprising that this crowd of progressives were not into Bernie but really into Kamala.

      https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2019/07/netroots-nation-activists-want-warren-and-harris/593935/

      There will be 16 more months of speech-making and glad-handing and glitzy ballroom fundraisers before Election Day. It would make sense not to commit to a presidential candidate just yet. But here at Netroots Nation, the premier annual convention for progressive activists, many attendees already seem fairly certain about their choice: They want Elizabeth Warren, the progressive senator from Massachusetts, to be their next president. And if they have to pick a second choice? It’s Senator Kamala Harris of California.

      It’s not necessarily intuitive that the same person would support both women: Warren is a folksy public-school teacher-turned-anti-corruption advocate, while the blazer-wearing Harris is more of an establishment type, with a long career climbing the ranks of power in California. Warren has pledged not to hold high-dollar fundraising events in favor of grassroots-style meet-and-greets, while Hollywood heavyweights have been some of Harris’s biggest campaign boosters.

      But, in interviews with two dozen progressive activists at Netroots, most people told me that, while they prefer Warren, they’d choose Harris if things go south for the Massachusetts lawmaker. They view both senators as passionate and capable. Some even suggested that the two women should run on the same ticket. “They bring different things to the table, but one thing is clear when you talk to each of them: their competency,” Rod Sullivan, a 53-year-old attendee from Iowa City, Iowa, told me. They would operate differently as presidents, he added. But each of them “could do this.”

      And, perhaps surprisingly, very few people offered praise for Senator Bernie Sanders, Warren’s democratic-socialist foil from Vermont. “If I have a chance of voting for an old white man or a less-old white woman, I’m going to vote for a less-old white woman,” Weber told me.

      Three years after Hillary Clinton’s astonishing defeat, it seemed, overall, that the activist class is really, really ready for a woman to be president. There may be an eternity in political time left to go before the Democratic primary is over. But that desire is already clear.

      • That scabby crowd is neither liberal nor progressive nor futuristic. What an insult to the first NN gatherings and the attendees there. Sure hope Bernie is planning a rest stop soon. T and R, LD!!

    • So Nancy—Any comment on this racist piece of trash?

      • Why yes, she did comment actually, twice in fact. And neither of her comments addressed her complicity at all. Quelle surprise!

        Her “Rather than attack Members of Congress” is particularly rich..

      • From the cranky (hat tip @orlbucfan) Jeffrey St. Clair at Counterpunch:

        How soon before Nancy Pelosi outlives her usefulness to the financial sponsors of the Democratic Party and they are compelled to replace her with a younger, smoother and more adroit enforcer of the neoliberal agenda?

      • tRump: a real bad. joke. of a hypocrite. Stupid, too.

      • However, do not let the shiny chrome Trump object distract you from the Epstein scandal, which Trump REALLY wants to go away. Every time there’s a problem he creates a diversion like this one.

        Unlike the Democrats, I can actually walk and chew gum at the same time.

        • One of my sisters is fully convinced that Trump will go down because of Epstein. I’m not so convinced, but time will tell. Trump does seem to be tangled up in it.

          • Trump and Clinton. It’s a big club….

          • I think an awful lot of people are putting the kind of faith in that the same way people did with the Mueller report. Look how well that worked.

            Of course, it would be nice if your sister were right, but with Barr as AG, I don’t see why he won’t just muscle this one like he did the Mueller report – where he created a totally fake narrative, got it out in public, and then kept the actual one bottled up. He won’t be able to do the exact same thing again this time, obviously, but you can bet that with the influence Trump has, Barr is working behind the scenes right now.

            At least this time, the crime is an obvious one, and we don’t have Robert “I couldn’t say anything about that” Mueller investigating it. What a joke he turned out to be.

    • Another one —

    • The WaPo at it again, ginning up a fight. Calling out the black progressives for racism. Interesting thing is that this piece has three writers, all of them white, and they are accusing the progressive black women of racism against the CBC. This is one issue these writers should leave alone. Black people, just like white people (and Indians and Hispanics) are not monolithic and it is patronizing to suggest that they should be.

      An all-out racially charged fight within the House Democratic Caucus escalated Saturday when an African American freshman lawmaker said the party doesn’t need “any more black voices that don’t want to be a black voice.”

    • a repeat from a ways back because I love it

    • Dems focus on identity politics, not economics

      Saw Michael Hudson on RT yesterday. He pointed out how the economy has been rigged for the 1% and the banks. One trick is the change of GNP to GDP where as the former did not include payments to foreign entities with say interest on the debt, the latter puts bank transactions and financial transactions on the par with production. Some of the ways to change to a finance based economy.

      I have never read his books but have been aware of his work and his group in St. Louis for a number of years.

      Here is an article on Naked Capitalism with an intro by Yves Smith who has a disagreement with the interviewer at the start this piece.

      Now that I follow Matt Stoller on twitter there is an ongoing treatment of economics

      Michael Hudson: De-Dollarizing the American Financial Empire

      Michael Hudson: If you’re an investor, you can make more money by dismantling the U.S. economy. You can borrow at 1 percent and buy a bond or a stock that yields 3 or 4 percent. That’s called arbitrage. It’s a financial free lunch. The effect of this free lunch, as you say, is to build up foreign economies or at least their financial markets while undercutting your own. Finance is cosmopolitan, not patriotic. It doesn’t really care where it makes money. Finance goes wherever the rate of return is highest. That’s the dynamic that has been de-industrializing the United States over the past forty years.

      Bonnie Faulkner: From what you’re saying, it sounds like Donald Trump’s policies are leading to doing to the United States what the IMF and World Bank have traditionally done to foreign economies.

      Michael Hudson: That’s what happens when you devalue. The financial sector will see that interest rates are going down, so the dollar’s exchange rate also will decline. Investors will move their money (or will borrow) into euros, gold or Japanese yen or Swiss francs whose exchange rate is expected to rise. So you’re offering a financial arbitrage and capital gain for investors who speculate in foreign currencies. You’re also hollowing out the economy here, and squeezing real wage levels and living standards.

      Way back in 2012, I tried to get the word out on a book written by a friend. He pointed out that this is the first time in history that an empire has financed itself by giving away its market to foreign companies. My friend used Hudson’s and other’s work.

      • Michael Hudson: The problem is that running an economy to help the people and raise living standards, and even to lower the cost of living and doing business, means not running it to help Wall Street. If someone knows how to run an economy, the financial sector wants to keep them out of any public office. High finance is short-term, not long-term. It plays the hit-and-run game, not the much harder task of creating a framework for tangible economic growth.

        You can do one of two things: You can help labor or you can help Wall Street. If running the economy means helping labor and improving living standards by giving better medical care, this is going to be at the expense of the financial sector and short-term corporate profits. So the last thing you want to do is have somebody run the economy for its own prosperity instead of for Wall Street’s purpose.

        At issue is who’s going to do the planning. Will it be elected public officials in the government, or Wall Street? Wall Street’s public relations office is the University of Chicago. It claims that a free market is one where rich Wall Street investors and the financial class run an economy. But if you let people vote and democratically elect governments to regulate, that’s called “interference” in a free market. This is the fight that Trump has against China. He wants to tell it to let the banks run China and have a free market. He says that China has grown rich over the last fifty years by unfair means, with government help and public enterprise. In effect, he wants Chinese to be as threatened and insecure as American workers. They should get rid of their public transportation. They should get rid of their subsidies. They should let a lot of their companies go bankrupt so that Americans can buy them. They should have the same kind of free market that has wrecked the US economy.

        China doesn’t want that kind of a free market, of course. It does have a market economy. It is actually much like the United States was in its 19th-century industrial takeoff, with strong government subsidy.

        • Bonnie Faulkner: How does today’s monetary imperialism – super imperialism – differ from the imperialism of the past?

          Michael Hudson: It’s a higher stage of imperialism. The old imperialism was colonialism. You would come in and use military power to install a client ruling class. But each country would have its own currency. What has made imperialism “super” is that America doesn’t have to colonize another country. It doesn’t have to invade a country or actually go to war with it. All it needs is to have the country invest its savings, its export earnings in loans to the United States Government. This enables the United States to keep its interest rates low and enable American investors to borrow from American banks at a low rate to buy up foreign industry and agriculture that’s yielding 10 percent, 15 percent or more. So American investors realize that despite the balance-of-payments deficit, they can borrow back these dollars at such a low rate from foreign countries – paying only 1 percent to 3 percent on the Treasury bonds they hold – while pumping dollars into foreign economies by buying up their industry and agriculture and infrastructure and public utilities, making large capital gains. The hope is that and soon, we’ll earn our way out of debt by this free ride arrangement.

          Imperialism is getting something for nothing. It is a strategy to obtain other countries’ surplus without playing a productive role, but by creating an extractive rentiersystem. An imperialist power obliges other countries to pay tribute. Of course, America doesn’t come right out and tell other countries, “You have to pay us tribute,” like Roman emperors told the provinces they governed. U.S. diplomats simply insist that other countries invest their balance-of-payments inflows and official central-bank savings in US dollars, especially U.S. Treasury IOUs. This Treasury-bill standard turns the global monetary and financial system into a tributary system.

          That is what pays the costs of U.S. military spending, including its 800 military bases throughout the world, and its foreign legion of Isis, Al Qaeda fighters and “color revolutions” to destabilize countries that don’t adhere to the dollar-centered global economic system.

          • and excellent comments to the article

            one person says that the interview summarizes 20 years of MH (Michael Hudson) work

            and several note that few people understand or want to take the effort to understand these issues

            Matt Stoller notes how well AOC does on econ issues and there was an article with a title something like AOC makes finance sexy again

          • wow. naming those in our “ foreign legion,” Al Qaeda+. interesting look at our system that we don’t hear much about.

      • ……When America went off gold, people began to wonder what was going to happen. Many predicted an economic doomsday. It was losing its ability to rule the world through gold. But what I realized (and was the first to publish) was that if countries no longer could buy and hold gold in their international reserves, what werethey going to hold? There was only one asset that they could hold: U.S. Government securities, that is, Treasury bonds.

        A Treasury bond is a loan to the US Treasury. When a foreign central bank buys a bond, it finances the domestic U.S. budget deficit. So the balance of payments deficit ends up financing the domestic budget deficit.

        The result is a circular flow of military spending recycled by foreign central banks. After 1971 the United States continued to spend abroad militarily, and in 1974 the OPEC countries quadrupled the price of oil. At that time the United States told Saudi Arabia that it could charge whatever it wanted for its oil, but it had to recycle all its net dollar earnings. The Saudis were not to buy gold. The Saudis were told that it would be an act of war if they didn’t recycle into the American economy the dollars they received for their oil exports. They were encouraged to buy U.S. Treasury bonds but, could also buy other U.S. bonds and stocks to help push up the stock and bond markets here while supporting the dollar.

        The United States kept its own gold stock, while wanting the rest of the world to hold its savings in the form of loans to the United States. So the dollar didn’t go down. Other countries that were receiving dollars simply recycled them to buy U.S. financial securities.

        What would have happened if they wouldn’t have done this? Let’s say you’re Germany, France or Japan. If you don’t recycle your dollar receipts back to the U.S. economy, your currency is going to go up. Dollar inflows from export sales are being converted into your currency, increasing its exchange rate. But by buying U.S. bonds or stocks, bid the price of dollars back up against your own currency.

        So, when the United States runs a balance-of-payments deficit under conditions where other countries keep their foreign reserves in dollars, the effect is for other countries to keep their currencies’ exchange rates stable – mainly by lending to the U.S. government. That gives the United States a free ride. It can encircle the world with military bases, and the dollars that this costs are returned to the United States…….

    • Well, isn’t this something.

    • https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/452974-trump-trails-biden-other-2020-democrats-in-new-poll

      President Trump trails former Vice President Joe Biden and several other Democratic White House hopefuls in the race, according to a poll released early Sunday.

      Biden, the Democratic front-runner, leads Trump by 9 points among registered voters, 51 to 42 percent, in a hypothetical matchup in the NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll. Biden leads Trump among African American voters, women, suburban voters and independents, pollsters found, while Trump saw support from men, white voters, and white voters without college degrees.

      Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) has a 7-point lead over the president, 50 to 43 percent, while Sen. Elizabeth Warren, (D-Mass.) is ahead of Trump by 5 points, 48 to 43 percent, in the survey.

      Sen. Kamala Harris, (D-Calif.) has a 1-point advantage, 45 to 44 percent, which is within the survey’s margin of error of 3.5 percentage points.

    • a couple of posts on TOP/DK

      Subir working to keep the left alive in DK


      Why is the Democratic House leadership attacking the left?

      and more support against the establishment

      BREAKING: Justice Dems, WFP, She The People, DFA, +others release statement re Pelosi vs. AOC drama

    • The Vos, Fitzgerald gerrymandered 2 bit dictatorship is at it again in WI:

      Wisconsin GOP wants to rewrite constitution to strip Democratic governor’s veto powers

      Wisconsin Republican lawmakers want to rewrite the state’s constitution to limit Democratic Gov. Tony Evers’ veto powers after he used his veto pen to increase school funding.
      Wisconsin Republicans voted to approve numerous new gubernatorial powers when Republican Gov. Scott Walker was in office but immediately moved to roll those back in a lame-duck session after Evers defeated Walker last year, along with limiting some longstanding gubernatorial authority. After Evers issued 78 partial vetoes of a Republican-authored budget last week, Republicans are now trying to limit the veto powers governors have held for years, the Associated Press reports.
      Republican state Sen. David Craig and state Rep. Mike Kuglitsch proposed an amendment to the state constitution that would limit the governor’s veto powers to increase funding levels in state budgets passed by the legislature.The move comes after the lawmakers accused Evers of a “power grab” because he used his veto power over the state budget to steer $65 million more toward schools, stop plans for a new prison, restore funding to Milwaukee’s child welfare system, and roll back work and drug testing requirements for the state’s food assistance program, according to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.”This unilateral abuse of power taken by the executive branch cannot go unchecked by the Legislature without seriously damaging the separation of powers doctrine in Wisconsin,” Craig and Kuglitsch wrote in a memo to colleagues. Evers spokeswoman Melissa Baldauff said that Republicans were just “sore losers” who want to “change the rules every time they don’t get their way.”
      “Republicans in the Legislature chose to ignore the will of the people, but Gov. Evers listened to the people who overwhelmingly said they wanted to see more investments in our public schools,” she told Wisconsin Public Radio. “To be clear, this is a temper tantrum in response to Gov. Evers using his authority to align the budget more closely with the will of the people and put more money into our kids’ schools.”Evers’ vetoes came after Republican lawmakers rejected his budget proposals, including a $1 billion expansion of Medicaid, a $1.4 billion increase in school funding and the creation of a nonpartisan redistricting commission.Wisconsin governors of both parties have had strong veto powers for years. The state’s governors have the authority to remove any part of the state budget. Walker issued 99 partial vetoes of the last state budget during his tenure and former Gov. Tommy Thompson, also a Republican, was such a fan of the veto power that he struck individual letters from budgets to structure the language into entirely different words than the legislature intended, according to the Journal Sentinel.Democratic Senate Minority Leader Jennifer Shilling said the attempt to roll back Evers’ veto powers are part of the Republican Party’s goals that they made clear when they rolled back much of his authority before he even took office.”Republicans are still in election denial and continue to look for ways to undermine our democratically elected governor every step of the way,” Shilling told the Journal Sentinel.Assembly Minority Leader Gordon Hintz, a Democrat, called the Republicans’ proposal an “attack on the institution of democracy.””The public should be outraged at the repeated attempts to change the powers of the office because they disagree with how those powers were used,” he said.

      In order for a constitutional amendment to be enacted, it must be passed in two consecutive legislative sessions and then be approved by a statewide voter referendum

      .
      Before Evers took office, Republicans used a lame-duck session to jam through dozens of Walker’s nominees and pass bills limiting the incoming governor’s authority and even barring him from pulling out of a multi-state lawsuit seeking to undo Obamacare. Evers was still able to withdraw Wisconsin from the suit after a judge temporarily blocked the laws earlier this year.
      https://www.salon.com/2019/07/12/wisconsin-gop-wants-to-rewrite-constitution-to-strip-democratic-governors-veto-powers/

    • crushing, that so many at the top looked the other way. wtaf

    • This is video/song that got him blacklisted from msm and record labels and placed on watchlists which resulted in his harassment but as a result also how I was first introduced to his music:

      • ‘Is Bernie going to come?’ Warren seizes on Sanders’ Netroots absence

        Organizers called Sanders’ absence a “missed opportunity”.

        “It’s 3,500 of the most engaged progressives in politics and he has decided that he is not going to talk to them,” said Carolyn Fiddler, spokeswoman for the Daily Kos website, a major sponsor. She added: “He’s letting Warren have the conversation to herself … and I don’t know why he would do that.”

        “His presence is here,” she said. “What he’s standing for is here. And then I am here. Progressives should feel very confident and assured that the senator is rooted in this movement and that is going to change the dynamics of this country.”

        https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/jul/14/bernie-sanders-elizabeth-warren-netroots-nation-democrats-progressives

    • https://www.politico.com/story/2019/07/14/bernie-sanders-pelosi-ocasio-cortez-1415811

      House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is being “a little bit” too tough on Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and her squad of young Democratic women, Sen. Bernie Sanders said Sunday.

      “What Alexandria and other young women and women of color are saying, ‘We have got to reach out to young people,’” the 2020 presidential contender said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” “We have to hear the pain of the working class of this country. And that is causing some political disruption within the leadership of the Democratic Party.“

      Asked by host Chuck Todd whether Pelosi is being too tough on the group, the Vermont senator said, “I think a little bit.“

      “You cannot ignore the young people of this country who are passionate about economic and racial and social and environmental justice,” Sanders said. “You got to bring them in, not alienate them.“

    • Another good re-tweet from @DanBacher:

    • if they weren’t so caught up in the immigration and m4a issues, I’d tweet this to the house progressives and Bernie. later.

      honestly, if we can’t count real votes, nothing else will matter.

    • https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/14/us/politics/joe-biden-new-hampshire.html

      In an interview, Mr. Sanders, who introduced the Medicare for All Act in the Senate and sometimes comes in second to Mr. Biden in early polls, bristled at Mr. Biden’s remarks, as he stressed that he, too, had been committed to passing and protecting the Affordable Care Act, even as he now advocates for something more far-reaching.

      He also took issue with what he perceived as Mr. Biden’s suggestion that the transition to Medicare for All could leave people with gaps in medical care, calling such an implication “totally absurd.”

      “Obviously what Biden was doing,” Mr. Sanders said, “is what the insurance companies and the pharmaceutical industries, Republicans, do: ignoring the fact that people will save money on their health care because they will no longer have to pay premiums or out-of-pocket expenses. They will no longer have high deductibles and high co-payments.”

      Asked whether it was fair to put Mr. Biden in the same category as the insurance and pharmaceutical industries, given his role in advancing the Affordable Care Act in the first place, Mr. Sanders replied: “The charge that he’s making is exactly what the Republicans are saying.”

      Mr. Biden’s campaign didn’t respond when asked for comment on those remarks. Mr. Sanders’s campaign said he will “confront the Democratic opponents of Medicare for All” in a speech on Wednesday in Washington, a sign that tensions between the two candidates could escalate this week.

      • “Washington(CNN) California Sen. Kamala Harris defended House Speaker Nancy Pelosi in a new interview, stating that she has had “a different experience” than New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who recently accused the House leader of “singling out of newly elected women of color.”

        “That’s not my experience with Nancy Pelosi,” Harris told the host of the “The Breakfast Club,” a popular New York-based radio show, during an interview that aired Friday. “And I’ve known her and worked with her for years. I’ve known her to be very respectful of women of color and very supportive of them.”

    • Let us now bow our heads for a moment of dystopia:

    • Let’s now wash that moment of dystopia out of our hair:

    • From last November, but still of interest:

    • To live with dignity:

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