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Don midwest
Don midwest

Indigenous People Protect Natural Communities

Heard this interview on local low power FM progressive radio. It was a while ago.

Prakash Kashwan, PhD, from the University of Connecticut, author of Democracy in the Woods: Environmental Conservation and Social Justice in India, Tanzania, and Mexico discusses why indigenous people as protectors of natural communities

Indigenous People Protect Natural Communities

He takes a strong position in support of indigenous people. Could call it radical.

Here is his book.

https://prakash-kashwan.uconn.edu/forthcoming-book-democracy-in-the-woods/

The remainder of this comment comes from his link above about the book and the reviews.

DEMOCRACY IN THE WOODS: Environmental Conservation and Social Justice in India, Tanzania, and Mexico (Oxford University Press 2017)
How do societies negotiate the apparently competing agendas of environmental protection and social justice? Why do some countries perform much better than others?

Democracy in the Woods addresses these question by examining land rights conflicts—and the fate of forest-dependent peasants—in the context of the different forest property regimes in India, Tanzania, and Mexico. These three countries are prominent in the scholarship and policy debates about national forest policies and land conflicts associated with international support for nature conservation. This unique comparative study of the trajectories of their national forestland regimes, challenges the received wisdom that redistributive policies necessarily undermine the goals of environmental protection. It shows instead that national environmental protection efforts take on either an inclusive (as in Mexico) or an exclusive form (as in Tanzania and, for the most part, in India), depending on whether dominant political parties are compelled to create structures of political intermediation, which help channel peasant demands for forest and land rights into the policy process.

The political analysis of the control over and the use of nature presented in this book opens up new avenues for reflecting on how legacies of the past and international interventions interject into domestic political processes to produce specific configurations of outcomes of environmental protection and social justice.

This book offers three different tests of this theory of political origins of forestland regimes: First, India’s most radical forestland reforms became possible because of the opening of a unique political opportunity structure, which enabled forestland rights movements to successfully press for long-awaited institutional reforms needed to address land rights conflicts. Second, it successfully explains the rather counter-intuitive local outcomes of the programs for formalization of land rights in India, Tanzania, and Mexico. Third, it offers a coherent explanation of why each of these three countries proposes a significantly different distribution of the benefits of forest-based climate change mitigation programs being developed under the auspices of the United Nations. Democracy in the Woods offers a theoretically rigorous argument about why and in what specific ways politics determine the prospects of a socially just and environmentally secure world.

Advanced praise for Democracy in the Woods
“Kashwan’s brilliant book offers a multi-scale political analysis of the production of policy for the control and use of nature. He develops a neat way of analyzing how national forestry regimes come to be and how they act for and on different classes of people.” Jesse Ribot, Professor of Geography, University of Illinois.
“Combines multi-level analysis with nuanced cross-national comparison to reveal how historical legacies, the state, local politics and social actors interact to shape conflicts over social equity and environmental conservation.” Jonathan Fox, Professor, School of International Service, American University.

“In Democracy in the Woods, Prakash Kashwan takes an ambitious step in the comparative analysis of land rights and environmental politics in a study that spans three continents. Kashwan explains how, in contexts of great social inequality, political institutions and processes mediate links between forest conservation, local land rights, and social justice outcomes. He challenges both scholars and activists to broaden their understanding of sources of challenge and opportunity in conservation and land-rights politics.” Catherine Boone, Professor of Comparative Politics, London School of Economics.

“A hugely significant contribution to our understanding of the social justice dimensions of environmental policy. Kashwan brings in the third dimension of economic growth as well as giving this book a distinctive niche.” Jairam Ramesh, MP, former Minister of Environment and Forests, Rural Development, 2009-2014 Government of India.

Reviews
“The book powerfully reminds us that both conservation and social justice outcomes related to land have more to do with de facto implementation of governance regimes than with the de jure construction of those regimes and, in doing so, it reminds scholars of all forms of institutions and governance regimes that the failure of state agencies to enforce laws and policies may not be a lack of state capacity per se so much as the outcome of the state responding to the diverse pressures that are placed upon it by powerful actors with competing interests.” The European Journal of Development Research
“… a powerful portrayal of the complexities of governance and justice contained in the issues of land displacement and environmental conservation, which can both contribute to widening livelihood and habitat insecurity.” LSE Review of Books

“In this exceptionally detailed and ambitious study, Kashwan sets out to explain the divergence of forestland institutions in three cases-India, Mexico, and Tanzania-by crafting a rich historical account of the interactions between colonial legacies, populist politics, and contemporary global environmental politics.” Global Environmental Politics

“This is a dense and informative book that successfully integrates an historical analysis of rights with a discussion of current political conflicts.” The Journal of Peasant Studies
“As Kashwan’s excellently researched book shows, choosing between land rights of the peasants and forest dwellers and environmental sustainability is a false choice.” The Wire

Don midwest
Don midwest

sorry for the blackout in the quotation above

it is the Univ of Conn forcing people to allows cookies

I got either the same or similar information from text at amazon.com

Democracy in the Woods

How do societies negotiate the apparently competing agendas of environmental protection and social justice? Why do some countries perform much better than others on this front?

Democracy in the Woods addresses these question by examining land rights conflicts–and the fate of forest-dependent peasants–in the context of the different forest property regimes in India, Tanzania, and Mexico. These three countries are prominent in the scholarship and policy debates about national forest policies and land conflicts associated with international support for nature conservation. This unique comparative study of national forestland regimes challenges the received wisdom that redistributive policies necessarily undermine the goals of environmental protection. It shows instead that the form that national environmental protection efforts take–either inclusive (as in Mexico) or exclusive (as in Tanzania and, for the most part, in India)–depends on whether dominant political parties are compelled to create structures of political intermediation that channel peasant demands for forest and land rights into the policy process. This book offers three different tests of this theory of political origins of forestland regimes. First, it explains why it took the Indian political elites nearly sixty years to introduce meaningful reforms of the colonial-era forestland regimes. Second, it successfully explains the rather counterintuitive local outcomes of the programs for formalization of land rights in India, Tanzania, and Mexico. Third, it provides a coherent explanation of why each of these three countries proposes a significantly different distribution of the benefits of forest-based climate change mitigation programs being developed under the auspices of the United Nations.

In its political analysis of the control over and the use of nature, this book opens up new avenues for reflecting on how legacies of the past and international interventions interject into domestic political processes to produce specific configurations of environmental protection and social justice. Democracy in the Woods offers a theoretically rigorous argument about why and in what specific ways politics determine the prospects of

a socially just and environmentally secure world.

Don midwest
Don midwest

Indigenous people are down to earth

Can “modern” people come down to earth?

Indigenous people were colonized by outsiders. Brexit is similar to an indigenous people wanting to go back and be safe in their territorial borders.

Bruno Latour’s book “Down To Earth” is available at end of the month. From the write up on the book.

This is why it is urgent to shift sideways and to define politics as what leads toward the Earth and not toward the global or the national. Belonging to a territory is the phenomenon most in need of rethinking and careful redescription; learning new ways to inhabit the Earth is our biggest challenge. Bringing us down to earth is the task of politics today.

From Twitter today.

@BrunoLatourAIME Nov 18

Isn’t Brexit the ideal case of redescription of territory argued in Down to Earth? People start with identity -leave us alone- and for 2 years they list, one after the other, all the attachments their subsistence depends on. Slow, painful, exemplary: we belong to another place.

Reply by young man in UK soon to get his PhD, Tim Howles, commenting on UK

@AimeTim 2h2 hours ago

Metaphors of spatio-temporal dislocation have abounded in the debate throughout: absolved of relations with our neighbours, we will be “free to fly”, trade will be “borderless”, we will “recapture our destiny”. Brexit was a self-destructive flourish of modernity at the last.

**
Turn to a different topic involving the earth

Hundreds of Thousands in France Protest Taxes by Blocking Roads

Bruno’s tweet response to this protest

@BrunoLatourAIME Nov 16

With the revolt of the French drivers against eco taxes on diesel gas, it is probably the first time the public and politicians realize that questions of ecology and questions of social justice are totally linked. After years of denying the link, the State is taken by surprise

Don midwest
Don midwest

Editorial: Camp Fire the tragedy we were all warned about

Editorial: Camp Fire the tragedy we were all warned about

LieparDestin

polarbear4

She is very real and precious. And this makes me fear for her, too. The beings of hate must already be burning with misplaced anger. I wish I could always just affirm goodness, but part of her strength is also her vulnerability and willingness to step out, like many great people.

orlbucfan

That is what I mean when I say more have to step forward. She isn’t the only one with her particular gifts. Where are the others?

humphrey

This causes me a bit of concern coming from the establishment.

https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/417413-major-dem-bundler-donors-waiting-on-2020-commitments-until-beto-orourke

A major Democratic fundraising bundler says party donors are holding off on contributions to any potential presidential contenders until rising star Beto O’Rourke decides whether he is running in 2020.

“They’re not wanting to sign on to other presidential campaigns until they know whether Beto is going,” Mikal Watts told Politico. “And if Beto is running, what good progressive Democrat wouldn’t want to work for Beto O’Rourke?”

O’Rourke, a three-term congressman from Texas, lost his Senate campaign to incumbent Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) by 3 points earlier this month. The race was surprisingly heated and tight for deep-red Texas. He told TMZ on Friday that he has not made any decisions yet about running.

“All the guy would have to do is send out an email to his fundraising base … and he raises $30 million,” a West Coast bundler told Politico. “It completely changes the game if Beto runs. And he should run … He’s Barack Obama, but white.”

Underlining by me. That is what concerns me.

polarbear4

yep. pushing him hard. we could do worse, but….

magsview

If the establishment pushes Beto into being the 2020 candidate I’m pretty sure that Trump would win.

This twitter thread is indicative of what I, personally, have seen.

I hope all talk of Beto in 2020 ends very soon.

TheLeftistheCenter

Yep in a red state compared to Ted Cruz he looked great, but now that national aspirations are forming and hes being compared to real progressives, his shine is wearing for me.

Just like Gillium, looks great for the position they are running for, but when held in a true light they really aren’t progressive enough and all the political warts start to pop out.

I have to admit I was blinded by him too, but mainly because he was being held up to Cruz, but when compared to Bernie or AOC reality begins to sink in.

orlbucfan

Gillum is more progressive than O’Rourke if that above tweet is correct.

polarbear4

Oh wow. i thought he didn’t take corpse money. Oil and gas???? No wonder the big bundlers are salivating.

orlbucfan

Beto is way too green for POTUS. So was Obummer but he served a couple of years in the Senate. He was a gifted orator and a YUPPIE. Perfect for the Banksters. Hope Beto isn’t like that garbage!

humphrey

This is a snapshot of the White House.
comment image?resize=807×807

polarbear4

Ouch. Lee Camp says 30% of the firefighters in California are from prisons, making $1/hr. Nothing said about it in MSM as they covered fire. Still listening, but it’s Lee, so here it is.

Our job to see through the propaganda.

polarbear4

Mid-term stuff.+

magsview

I did a little bit of research on that and, supposedly, the firefighting camp/prisons are occupied by volunteers. Some inmates talk of it being a chance to challenge themselves, but it’s obviously exhausting and dangerous for them, and they should be paid more to do it.

For the inmates who volunteer, the program offers sentence reductions and more comfortable prison accommodations. Inmates who have been convicted of crimes like sexual offenses and arson are not eligible to volunteer.

Using inmates to fight fires saves the state $100 million per year, according to WBUR, but critics say the program amounts to slave labor. In August, David Fathi, director of the ACLU’s National Prison Project, said prisoners are a “uniquely vulnerable part of the workforce.”

https://www.npr.org/2018/11/18/669088658/serving-time-and-fighting-california-wildfires-for-2-a-day

polarbear4

Thanks, mags. It would be nice if Lee’s staff would do that kind of research, too! I imagine it’s not only a challenge, but a chance to get out of the prison, even if it is into the fire. (Out of the frying pan comes to mind.)

wi60

One thought would be to pay them better but to use that money towards restitution that so many inmates have. That way when they are released one less debt to worry about and hopefully leads to a better chance at a fresh start W/O that debt over their heads. A lot of inmates have child support their behind on as well.

polarbear4

#RakeNews: Finns Ridicule Trump’s Claim That They Prevent Fires Like California’s by “Raking” Forests

In remarks published in a Finnish newspaper on Sunday, Niinisto said he spoke briefly with Trump about forest management when they were both in Paris for Armistice Day events last weekend, but he had no recollection of discussing “raking” as a wildfire prevention practice and laughed when the interviewer asked him about the U.S. president’s comments.

“I told him that Finland is a land covered by forests, but we also have a good control system and network,” Niinisto said.

Like their president, ordinary Finns were baffled by Trump’s comments and quickly took to social media to mock the U.S. president with photos and videos accompanied by hashtags like #RakeFinlandGreatAgain and #RakeNews.

polarbear4

humphrey

Unfortunately this is what is happening.

humphrey

As an aside. This would be hard to adjust to.

polarbear4
magsview

You saw that? lol, I thought that was a good GIF. 😉

Thanks pb.

magsview

I know that I would have a very hard time adjusting to no sun!

From what I hear, it’s also tough on the flip side.

polarbear4

Now it’s Nadar, Pitt, Sachs, and Hedges, so far (that I know of), warning of the possiblity of a Trump constitutional crisis. Remember, he put Kavanaugh in there specifically for a vote for executive power.

If you see Kelly and Mattis replaced with warmongers, this move might reveal his ultimate trump card. He can use a war to shut down political opposition and dissent in the name of supporting the troops.”

Trump has a few weeks before the Democrats take control of the House. This may give him enough time to carry out his constitutional coup and consolidate power. Our decayed democratic institutions, including a corporate press that has rendered the working class and the poor invisible and serves as an apologist for corporate power, are detested by many Trump Republicans. Trump can rally his cultish supporters, hermetically sealed in their non-reality-based belief system, to attack and demolish the last of our democratic protections.

“We have a tremendous dearth of readiness by major constituencies such as civic groups, the legal profession, the business community and academia to deal with someone who misuses his authority, power and resources,” Nader warned. “Nobody knows how to do it more precisely, relentlessly, strategically and tactically than the cunning Donald J. Trump.”

magsview

Trump appears to be getting more and more reckless. Did you see that tweet referring to Adam Schiff as “Adam Schitt”?? Not a good sign! He might be unraveling.

Trump tweets about “Adam Schitt” after complaining about decorum

https://www.vox.com/2018/11/19/18102577/trump-adam-schitt-tweet

AS.jpg
orlbucfan

THere’s a reason why so many GOPukes abandoned their cushy House seats this election year. Wonder if this is it?

orlbucfan

Ralph Nader might have been a champion of the ordinary class back in the 1960s and ’70s. He has zero cred now. He’s a millionaire who helped the Bush Cabal steal FL in the 2000 election. He’s an old wind bag I totally ignore.

wi60

Weird as he was fighting for consumer safety back then but after his presidential run kinda faded away

humphrey

It is not almost. It is a fact.

humphrey

She is a good addition to Congress.

Rashida Tlaib Perfectly Explains How to Combat Trump’s Divisive Rhetoric

humphrey

Tough guy Trump won.t listen to the Khashoggi tape but I imagine torturer Gina Haspel enjoyed it.

It might impact his stance on Saudi Arabia.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-46254571

US President Donald Trump says he has been briefed on a recording of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi’s murder – but will not listen to it himself.

“It’s a suffering tape, it’s a terrible tape,” he told Fox News Sunday.

The CIA has reportedly concluded the powerful Saudi Crown Prince ordered the killing but the White House is yet to endorse that assessment.

Saudi Arabia has called the claim false and denied Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman had any knowledge of the murder.

Khashoggi, a prominent critic of the Saudi government, was killed after entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on 2 October to obtain a marriage document.

magsview

I don’t blame him for not wanting to listen to it, but if he has any doubts about the CIA’s conclusion then he MUST listen to it.

magsview

Have you happened to have seen Sibel Edmonds talking about the Khashoggi affair? She’s gone full conspiracy theory, talks about Khashoggi being a CIA asset. Here for ex:

orlbucfan

Good thing I avoid Twitter cos it’s a plague. Kudos to you brave souls for pouring thru the twits and posting the ones we read on here! 🙂

polarbear4

What do you think, wi60?

How Tammy Baldwin, Target of $14 Million in Outside Spending, Sent the Koch Brothers and Their Minions Packing

Baldwin wasn’t shy about exposing ties to ALEC.

Baldwin was the first candidate in a high-profile race that used the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) to effectively frame her opponent as doing the bidding of corporate special interests. …

She was good with rural issues and go 12 % of Walker voters-woo hoo!

According to Sarah Lloyd, a dairy farmer and the co-chair of the progressive group Our Wisconsin Revolution, Baldwin knew the people and knew the issues most important to rural voters. “Tammy’s office is excellent at constituent services; she knows farmers across the state and can speak fluently about the agricultural issues that are at the heart of Wisconsin’s rural communities.”

I’m not sure about M4A from this, but it sounds better than many for WI.

She worked hard in the Senate to expand the Affordable Care Act, taking great pride in the amendment to allow young people to stay on their parents’ plans until they were 26, and she doesn’t shrink from Medicare for All. I saw her after the election and she was still thrilled about being about to go back to the Senate to work on the issue!”

magsview

Baldwin framing her opponent by using ALEC as a slur (as a political tactic) catches on…that would be a very good thing.

wi60

Healthcare,School funding hit home with that 12% as they were in the rural areas which were hurt by Walkers refusal to take the Fed money for expansion and the school funding cuts over 2 terms. Another issue was Foxxconed the northern part of the state isn’t going to benefit by it much other than paying for it. Vukmir stood fast with Trumpcorp and that helped Baldwin as well. Every R in WI is an ALEC member. Vos and Fitzgerald are so far up ALEC”s Ass they could preform a colonoscopy. Their worse that Walker in a lot ways.

orlbucfan

She was a class act when she got elected. Hope she can avoid the stench of Sick Rott!

humphrey

Of course the racists have to stick together.

https://www.politico.com/story/2018/11/19/trump-supports-hyde-smith-1003296

President Donald Trump continued to throw his support behind Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith of Mississippi on Monday, as her campaign tries to recover from recent controversial statements she’s made.

“.@cindyhydesmith loves Mississippi and our Great U.S.A,” the president commented on a retweet promoting a rally he is hosting for Hyde-Smith on Nov. 26.

Hyde-Smith, who was appointed by Gov. Phil Bryant in March to fill retired GOP Sen. Thad Cochran’s seat, is facing a runoff against Democrat Mike Epsy to finish out the remaining two years of Cochran’s term.

The president will be hosting two rallies on Nov. 26, one in Tupelo and another in Biloxi. Trump has bragged about how his appearances for candidates helped push them over the line in the midterm elections earlier this month.

However, Hyde-Smith’s campaign over the past week has been reeling from a video posted in which she said that if she were invited by one of her supporters to a “public hanging,” she would be in “the front row.” Hyde-Smith’s opponent, Epsy, is African-American.

orlbucfan

She’s a fruit loop who better shut her mouth. The AAs came out in AL and Espy will win if they show up in MS.

humphrey

I doubt that AOC will ever forget where she came from.

humphrey

It is too bad that they all didn’t win.

magsview

Yes. Imo, Abrams and probably Gillum robbed by electoral shenanigans with at least a small portion of racism thrown in.

While Jealous mostly stymied by centrist Dems and bitter Hillary supporters.

polarbear4

i so hope they all run again. I really want Jealous in a higher position. He deserves it and is a Bernie bro.

orlbucfan

Andrew Gillum will run again. Count on it.

magsview

polarbear4

Sweet. Especially from Palast.

magsview

I thought you might appreciate that polarbear! 🙂

orlbucfan

T and R, jcitybone!! Any Birdies going to listen to the climate change townhall on the 3rd? I have it bookmarked on Bernie’s senate/gov. site.

polarbear4

Full statement by @ACLU’s @benwizner: pic.twitter.com/v8ziFsjIHC

— Jamil Dakwar (@jdakwar) November 16, 2018

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

On the dangers of prosecuting Assange.

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